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This has been covered extensively in the past, try a search for more info.
Each bike has it's own merits and it depends on what you want out of a bike....
S
 

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one thing a 750 has OVER the 1000 is "Cheaper Insurance"
 

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if this is your first bike, i suggest looking in the section called "the starting line" and reading some of the sticky posts. otherwise, you should know the differences between the 750 & 1k.
 

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I had both of them (both bikes were stolen BTW). The 750 isn’t as comfortable as the 1000 (I’m 6.0, 33” inseam 165lbs). The 1000 actually felt just as light as the750 if not lighter. What really surprised me is that the 1000 is easier to ride than the 750, especially slow riding. I found that it was hard to keep the 750 below 35mph, I can’t explain but the 750’s engine didn’t seem to be in any type of comfort zone when traveling below 40mph (plenty of bucking and surging). I was able to adjust my throttle inputs to smoothen things out but the 750’s throttle is super sensitive during low speed on-off throttle situations. The 1000 on-the-other-hand was content to just putt-putt comfortably at low speeds. In regards to engine power it isn’t even close; the 1000’s engine power blows away the 750. The difference between the 1000 and the 750’s engine output is much more than the difference between the 750 and the 600.

The 750 is a nice bike but the 1000 seems to be better balanced, has better low-speed on-off throttle response, feels just as light, and is much more powerful.

As far as appearance, I think that the 750 is a slightly better looking bike. What I really liked about the 750 is the projector lens headlight, the 1000 doesn’t have that, I’m not sure why. The 1000 does look nice though IMO. The 1000 is the second nicest looking 1000 behind the ZX-10 IMO. That doesn’t mean I’ll be getting a ZX-10 when my insurance pays me for my stolen K5. I’ll be getting another K5. Peace
 

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I'll agreed with GSXR1K, that the big difference is torque. THe 1K seems to be a much better bike for the street. It's so smooth.

No more "drop a gear and disapear."

It will now be "roll it on and be gone."
 

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The thousand is the only way too go ......if Like me for instance,
you are too lazy to shift more then twice during you commute to Krytals,
you wieght more then the gsxr 600 ( by yourself ),
you have no other way to impress your friends,
you have no other way to impress the hookers you seem to always have to pay extra for anyway,
you sat on one in the showroom and blew the shocks so you were legally bound to purchase it,
or it's the only stock vehicle availible that can get your arse from 0 to 60 in under 12 seconds,
not to mention the fact that with the crasy gas prices these days,
I can fill up the tank for less then one trip to Taco hell, for a snack.
and it was one of the more comfortable tanks on the market to rest your gut on.
 

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Thanks for all the replies.

So why would anyone buy a 750 then??

Why doesn't everyone just buy a 1000??
Well, a few factors - cost, insurance, experience.

Some people might not be able to afford a 1K. If you can afford a 1k, you might not be able to handle the insurance, which is based on severals factors; such as age of rider, location, and years of experience. And then, there are others who are smart enough to know that they cannot manage the power and brute strenght of a 1K. These people wisely decide to start off on a 600 or 750. After a couple of years on those bikes, they 'upgrade' to a 1000. Every has a different reason for getting the bike they have. You decide what is best for you. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The root of my question is that I don't want to buy a bike and then a few months down the road regret not going bigger. I've ridden motorcross bikes for years, but never owned a street bike and a TON of people I know who bought less than 1000cc bikes all wanted to upgrade within a matter of months?

Thats why I wondered if the 750 was the best of both worlds or if the 1000 was the best bike to own as everyone seems to tout?
 

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I have a '91 750 that I rode stock for nearly 8 years. Then I installed a 955cc kit. Wow. A 30% increase in torque absolutely transformed the bike. Instead of having to work for acceleration by downshifting and revving very high, I can now just twist the throttle and go. Go much faster than my 750 could no matter how high I revved it. I expected this, but what I didn't expect was how much that fact freed up my attention so I could concentrate on riding the bike. I didn't learn how to corner until I could pick one gear and stay in it through an entire series of corners. Mid corner throttle control is far easier when you don't have to concentrate on keeping the revs up in order to drive off the corner. Keep in mind my 955 still makes less peak horsepower than a new 750, but having 20 or so pounds more torque in the midrange has transformed my ability to ride a bike. And the ability to snack regularly on unknowing 600 pilots on my old "750" is quite satisfying.
 

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The root of my question is that I don't want to buy a bike and then a few months down the road regret not going bigger. I've ridden motorcross bikes for years, but never owned a street bike and a TON of people I know who bought less than 1000cc bikes all wanted to upgrade within a matter of months?

Thats why I wondered if the 750 was the best of both worlds or if the 1000 was the best bike to own as everyone seems to tout?

thats kind of a big bike to start, even if you rode 600cc. Alot of people i know swear they know how to ride, just cause you can hop on a 1000cc and go in strait lines, and make turns at 30 doesnt mean you can really handle the bike....especially in a sticky situation. i would recommend a 600 and then work your way up, if you cant enjoy yourself on a 600 then you must be a
 

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The root of my question is that I don't want to buy a bike and then a few months down the road regret not going bigger. I've ridden motorcross bikes for years, but never owned a street bike and a TON of people I know who bought less than 1000cc bikes all wanted to upgrade within a matter of months?

Thats why I wondered if the 750 was the best of both worlds or if the 1000 was the best bike to own as everyone seems to tout?
You won't be disappointed with the 750. It's an exciting bike and a great way to learn how to deal with high performance. About 140 hp at the crank so it's not going to leave you wanting more. It kept me happy. Just a really fun bike. The 600cc is a bike I feel that doesn't have enough power and you really have to rev it up to get anything out of it, but that's me. The 750 has more torque and hp, it didn't disappoint.

Funny thing was the 750 actually seemed like too much power especially for the street. After awhile I got comfortable with it and before I knew it I was able to ride at maximum pace without any difficulty. I love the sound of the 750 with a race pipe, very unique. I learned a great deal on that bike before I moved up to the 1000. It's a classic machine that will keep you smiling.

Since then I've moved up to the 1000 and it lives up to it's reputation as the king of performance and then some. I still have yet to top the bike out (170 mph so far in fifth gear) and the rev limiter seems a long, long way away. This machine is very difficult to ride at maximum power street or track without ample amounts of room. The speeds are very high and quick in a shorter amount of time because of the torque. I find myself riding on the freeway in third gear most of the time at about 6K rpm to stay at a reasonable pace with traffic. I've even ran in second in short bursts but it's a bit to high in the revs and scares other drivers around you. The bike will do over 100 mph in first gear before you hit the rev limit. I usually stay between third and fifth for normal drives and rarely see sixth unless I really want to cruise easy or I'm shooting for top speed. If it were not for the bikes gear restrictions it feels like this bike could break 190 mph actual speed.

So to give you an idea the 1000 is a monster with about 176 hp at the crank bone stock and no RAM air. Around 40 hp over the 750 and lots more torque. It is not a bike for everyone especially the less experienced. You need maturity and skill otherwise you can get into a lot of trouble or end your life. If you have any doubt of your abilities as a sport class rider then stay away from the 1000, it's not worth getting as some status symbol to show the world.

Now that I've ridden both bikes I definitely prefer the 1000 but I'm glad I started out on the smaller bike to give me time and experience to learn the sportbike performance envelope and not be too overwhelmed. The 1000 is powerful but for me it is not intimidating or too much to handle at all, and I have no fear on the bike. I'm very at home and can take the bike to maximum revs no problems given I have a safe place to do so. The K5 gives me so much comfort and confidence it feels like I was born on this machine. In fact I wasn't as confident on the old K2 750 design as I am currently on the K5 1000. Has a lot to do with the bikes design and capabilities. It's an amazing difference. The K5 750 is probably also much more inspiring than the older bikes. Whatever you decide, get the latest model of a specific class just for it's advanced power and handling characteristics.
 
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