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Want to set the clearances on the valves of my 1052 motor.

Never done anything like this before so would appreciate any guidance on how best to do this
 

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A person wrote a thread the other day asking about how to adjust valves on his Suzuki GSX-R. After I typed it all up and went back and forth to the computer after dinner and such the information was lost. So, I thought I would post a thread letting the peeps out there that are into the "how" it is done...

First I will start off by letting everyone know that I have been a motorcycle technician for a major dealer here in California for over ten years. Everybody has there own techniques and some opinions will differ but this is the fastest (good if your a flat rate tech) way to check, adjust and move on.

I will assume that everyone can get the necessary items moved to get to the valve area. And if you can't then you probably shouldn't be trying to adjust valves, no offence. This will be our starting point.

First, once the valve cover is moved you should remove all the spark plugs as well. We need to get the #1 Cyl on TDCC (top dead center compression). The Cylinders are ALWAYS numbered from left to right as you are sitting on the bike. So the #1 cyl would be the most left cylinder. To get the #1 Cyl on TDCC you must rotate the crankshaft by removing the inspection cover on the left side of the stator assy. There will be a 17mm bolt holding the rotor on the crankshaft. You ALWAYS rotate the motor twords the front tire or in the forward direction. You can also turn the motorcycle on, zip tie the clutch lever in and tap the start button as well if you feel comfortable with that process, but for instructional purposes we will be using a 17mm socket and rachet technique. Now you rotate the crankshaft while watching the lobes of the cams rotate and depress the buckets of the valves. You need to first watch the exhaust cam depress and then right after the INTAKE cam depresses the valves on the #1 Cylinder the cam lobes need to be pointing to the 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock position. With the cam lobes in this position on the #1 Cylinder we can check all of #1 Cylinders valves both intake and exhaust, #2 Cylinder exhaust valves only and #3 Cylinder intake valves only. We will use a measurement of .10~.20mm intake and .20~.30mm exhaust. Check your service manual for the ACTUAL specs!!! Sometimes specs can be found on the bike itself under the seat area. If the .10 fits and the .20 doesn't then your in spec on that intake valve only. If the .10 doesn't fit or .20 feels loose then you need to record how tight or loose that particular valve is so you can reshim it later. You do the same process for all your exhaust measurements as well. Now, once you have done all of #1 cyl, #2 exhuast and #3 intake valves we need to do the other eight. You now need to get the #4 cyl on TDCC and do all #4 cyl valves, #3 exhaust and #2 intake measurements. Once you have all your recorded measurements you need to put the #1 Cyl back to TDCC for the cam removal. I use pins between cams, also use the alignment marks on the cam sprockets to make sure everything is where it needs to be. The marks will have IN and EX marked on them and the will have a horizontal line that should be even with the gasket surface of the valve cover. You need to relieve tension off of the cam chain by removing or backing out the tensioner. Then you need to remove the cam caps. Now the buckets should be exposed. You look at your notes of your measurements and select the appropiate shim for all the mis-adjusted valves. Once the shims have been replace then you can put the exhaust cam in first and then the intake cam, making sure you have the correct pins between cams and that the marks on the sprockets are aligned as well. Put the cam caps back on and torque to spec. Slowly reinstall the cam chain tensioner until there is good tension on the cam chain. Now, you need to rotate the engine over in the forward direction (twords the front wheel) to make sure you didn't misalign the cams timing with the crankshaft. If the engine stops turning then you have a valve that is coming in contact with the piston and you need to make sure your cam to crankshaft timing is correct. After rotating this 3 to 4 times you can put the motorcycle back together.

Let me know if this information is to much or if there is anything else you might need explained. I hope this all helps.
 

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1052 has forked rockers with lock nutted adjusters, not shim and buckets. Great write up for 91-2(?) shim and bucket heads, though. Troy341
 
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