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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

Ok, where were we? Oh yeah: digging into the shock body itself. This will all happen from the bottom of the shock body, so let's invert the shock and firmly clamp the upper mount in the padded vise. Notice I have my air pistol and hatchet at the ready in case anything really crazy comes out of this thing.



We are going to use the half-moon openings in the cap to tap it off with a punch. This cap serves no purpose other than to cover the seal head. There is not even an o-ring between it and the shaft. This is a press fit as well and should require effort and technique similar to extracting the bladder. Calmly walking it out from both sides. The punch (even a brass one) will dig into the aluminum cap some, but that's life in the big city. I suppose if you had some hard plastic or nylon punches you might avoid marring the half-moons.





And off comes the cap, revealing the seal head and the circlip that holds it in. While you can see this circlip better than the one re. the bladder, we still need to tap the seal head down a touch for clearance to get it out.





The seal head may be pretty tight. Here I really like a brass punch, and work my way around with a "lots of little taps" attitude. Some WD40 might not hurt either. This thing hasn't seen the light of day for a while.



And there is the circlip...Given that this one is recessed more and has the shaft in the way, I've had the best luck extracting with a smallish non-phillips screw driver as once I get the circlip pried away from the wall, it seems to want to slide up the screwdriver more readily, as opposed to a dental tool. Again, be patient. Getting this circlip out is probably the most frustrating part of the whole project. You can get behind it, but man, it sure does want to snap right back in that groove, doesn't it?



Now we are ready to yank out the shock guts. Everything is nutted onto the shock shaft, so nothing should be flying out here. Make sure the shock body it firmly clamped, and wiggle the shaft, etc. out of the shock body. You can see that my right hand is pulling up and wiggling while my left helps keep the wiggles focused and gives some nice extra up oomph via thumb pressure.



Lo and behold, we have separation. Yuk. That is some nasty oil.



Here's what we have after applying the other half of our can of carb cleaner. See, there's really hardly anything to this thing. Congrats again, you are now finished with disassembly, unless you are going to get fancy and mess with the shim stack. If that's the case, you should already know everything you've just read and then some.





Unless you're feeling adventurous, don't go losing anything until I have a chance to do the write-up on reassembly...
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

3 Observations...

1-You should be a teacher!
2-I'm a little turned on by that bulging bladder!
3-After all this work, are the seals/o-rings still available for this shock?
4-I'm a little turned on by that bulging bladder!
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

Observation is that the aluminum cap over the seal head has the holes drilled right through. Could a person use the same punch and merely tap it into the hole and actually force the cap off? Rather than trying to tap up from the hole! Great writeup.
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

Observation is that the aluminum cap over the seal head has the holes drilled right through. Could a person use the same punch and merely tap it into the hole and actually force the cap off? Rather than trying to tap up from the hole! Great writeup.
Probably not. There is enough overlap between that cap and the shock body that it would likely bind. It wants to be walked up and out, side-to-side. Easy there tiger, the word "force" shall not even enter your mind.
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

good one mr pike keep them photos coming,any scratching from removing circlip in shock should be cleaned up before removing piston -it makes removal easier and iff you find
piston seal is no longer available you haven't damaged seal getting piston out the seal maybe reused
so the shim stack is altered by the dampning adjustment how? be sure to include that
in the next instalment please i'm interested ,
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

great write up....keep it coming...
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

But...what about replacement parts for the rebuild?
Are they STILL available?
(still aroused by that bladder by the way!)(Haaaaaaaaaaaaa)
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

But...what about replacement parts for the rebuild?
Are they STILL available?
Jeez. I gotta hold your hand all the way through this thing? :dissapointed :biggrin

I have no idea at this point. Never had to source anything, and don't plan on investigating anytime soon. Perhaps another member can help flesh this out...the Traxxion guys...?

The dampers I've done have not been leaking in the first place, and all rubber bits, upon inspection, were in quite good condition and deemed reuseable. The only things that seal are the big o-ring on the seal head plus the bladder.

If it makes you feel better, we can call this an "overhaul" or a "refresh" as opposed to a "rebuild".

Cheers,

DP
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

Maybe i WANT you to hold my hand?

All that work and you are installing the same seals/o-rings back in?
No...No...No...not the way to go!
Frankly...I'm surprised a learned guy like yourself would refresh/rejuvenate/overhaul without new seals/o-rings?
Too much effort involved to reuse old seals/o-rings (I.M.H.O.)
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

Well, my man, that's what makes the world go 'round now isn't it. :cheers

You find and buy me a new bladder and o-ring, I'll put 'em in.
 

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The other OG
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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

[QUOTE=
The dampers I've done have not been leaking in the first place, and all rubber bits, upon inspection, were in quite good condition and deemed reuseable. The only things that seal are the big o-ring on the seal head plus the bladder.

there is also the seal- rubber lipped to the shaft
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

Like many things, it's all in what you want to spend. It's also want you want/need/expect in the end.

My position is:

1-2 hrs of my time
+
Basic tools I already have
+
$10 for suspension fluid
+
$3.99 for a can of carb cleaner

A refreshed shock that provides acceptable ride quality for under $20

Would a fancier shock work better? Sure. But at this point, with all OEM bits, the next handling priority for me would have to be getting some additional ride height into that rear end.
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

Dpike
Sorry I was not more clear, Thanks for the tutorial I like others really appreciate it (especially being a newbbie). I just investigated that 86-88 slabbie parts availiability at RT becuase it was mentioned earlier in this thread. However, the only way to get the gold valves is to have RT install them. :hammer.

So if one was to go that route, that is where the $500 bucks comes up. I'm not sure that sinking $500 into the OEM shock is really such a great idea, when a used Ohlins is $200-$300. A rebuild on that and you have a fresh ohlins for less than the stock shock.

Certainly doing your rebuild/overhaul is probably better than trying to misfit an R1/R6 but it is not trying to compete with what you could do with $500 :burnout.

Thanks again.

Posplayr
 

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Re: So you want to rebuild a 1st Gen 1100 shock (Pt.1)

I think you can probably get the RT GV someplace and install it yourself, but I could be wrong. And if you did, you could likely do it cheaper. Plus as dpike has shown, the rebuild is a snap. I'd say that if you can't get the shock you seek then going that way would be just as good. I have a stock shock on my ZX9R that has a gold valve in it and the suspension in it is great! I also have a gold valve in the front. If having LE do the front and rear of the track bike proves too expensive, I'll likely check into getting the RT parts direct and putting them in myself. I really don't need to pay labor charges to someone for something that I know I can do myself.

The only other thing I might check into is using the remote nitro can off a 3rd gen to get the extra adjustment on it so that I have compression and rebound adjustments. Put that on the second gen shock with a SS hose and a RT GV and I'd gamble to say that I'll have just as good, if not better, shock than any used Ohlins or Fox - of course by the time you finish all that, you will also have close to what it would cost for a used Fox or Ohlins anyway.

So, for my track bike, if I go with RT products it would cost me $170 for the GV in the front, $110 for the .95 kg/mm springs in the front, and about $75 in seals, shims, and oil so that's $355 for a dialed in front. The for the rear, about $50 on ebay for a 3rd gen shock that I can take the can off of, $170 for the GV, $110 for the spring, and about $50 in new seals, bumper, bladder, oil, and nitro charge. So for the rear it would cost me about $380, again dialed in. Total for a dialed in suspension would be just under $800 and that is actually cheap by todays aftermarket shock standards. If you could buy a new Ohlins shock it would be closer to a grand for the rear alone - to say nothing of the front. Not really too bad when you think of it that way, and make no mistake about it, when the suspensions on these "old" bikes are dialed in, they work pretty damn well.
 
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