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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I have a 2006 GSX-R 600 with approx 25,000 kms on it.

I recently went to use it after it sat for 3 weeks and it wouldn't start - dead battery. I charged the battery and checked voltages from the battery with the following results:

Bike off / no key inserted - 12.39 volts
Key in, ignition on, killswitch off (ie: only lights on): 11.9 volts
Key in, ignition on, killswitch on (ie: just after fuel pump has primed): 11.75 volts
Bike running, only just started - 11.75 volts
At warm temperature idle around 15 minutes after starting - 11.36 volts
At 5,000 RPM in neutral - 11.18 volts

This would indicate to me that the charging system is damaged and needs to be replaced. From what I've read, I am assuming the stator is burned out. I have some questions:


  1. Do you have to replace BOTH the regulator/rectifier AND stator at the same time to get maximum guarantee the problem will be fixed? (ie: is it a waste of time only replacing one?)
  2. Will installing a new regulator/rectifier in the side mount position prevent stator damage occurring again, or is there still a chance I'll have to deal with this in the future?
  3. Does a mosfet regulator/rectifier completely prevent stator damage from ever occurring again?
  4. What is the recommended replacement option for the reg/rec and stator? I've seen several discussions on stock vs Ricks Motorsport vs Roadstercycle?
  5. Is there a way to fix this and 100% prevent it from occurring again? (Other than selling and buying a newer GSXR :wink2:)
 

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Re: Trying to understand the regulator/rectifier & stator issues & options

proper diagnosis is the key, usually you don't have to replace both, stator damage can be caused by bad connection for example (3 terminal plug for example) you can find in manual how to get checked both stator and rectifier, when my stator went bad I have it rewounded and it is still working fine (rectifier wasn't damaged) also I have my rectifier moved into the tail (this requires longer wires) and added 12v fan for better cooling.

Wysłane z mojego SM-G920F przy użyciu Tapatalka
 

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Where to start...

Your battery is dickered. After a good charge, your battery should be WELL over 12.6V. 12.6V is the MINIMUM you should see on a serviceable battery after charge.

11.XX volts at 5k rpm is indicative of one of two things: either your stator or R/R is dickered.

Get your service manual and do the charging system tests.

1. You do NOT need to replace both stator and rectifier at once. Replace the bad component and the test the system, again, to see if everything is working properly.

2. Side-mounting the R/R is the OEM fix for their shitty decision to mount the R/R above the headers behind the rad. It is a better place for the R/R, but will not guarantee that the component will no longer fail. (These machines are 13 years old now, electrical issues abound)

3. MOSFET R/Rs are not magic fuckery. They work differently than "old school" rectifiers, but after reading some threads, I think the OEM replacement that dealers are selling are MOSFET, anyway. Disclaimer: if you ask me for the difference between the two, I may bore you to a coma.

4. Rick's has a good reputation on this site. I, however, always push people in the direction of OEM for replacement electrical... The OEM components are top notch, Suzuki just mounted the R/R in the wrong spot for a while and made an urban myth about their OEM electrical reliability.

5. No. You bought a 13 year old bike- expect issues.
 

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^^^ I agree about the battery.

If you didn't have a draw on the battery when you checked the voltage I'd take it to an autoparts shop and have them test it.
You checked the voltage, but did you test the amperage? What about cranking amps?

Do a google search for testing cranking amps or drop by an Autoparts store and have them check it.
Here is a cut and paste from a random site to check the cranking amps.

"How To Test The Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) of a Car Battery
Keep the multimeter probes connected to the battery terminals and fire up your ignition.
You will need an extra hand for this specific task because you need to check how the reading fluctuates while you crank up the ignition.
In an ideal scenario, the value should drop (around 10V) and return to a higher value (more than 12V).
And if the reading stays constant while the engine is still running, you can confirm that the battery is in spick and span condition."
 

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Hi all,


  1. Do you have to replace BOTH the regulator/rectifier AND stator at the same time to get maximum guarantee the problem will be fixed? (ie: is it a waste of time only replacing one?)
  2. Will installing a new regulator/rectifier in the side mount position prevent stator damage occurring again, or is there still a chance I'll have to deal with this in the future?
  3. Does a mosfet regulator/rectifier completely prevent stator damage from ever occurring again?
  4. What is the recommended replacement option for the reg/rec and stator? I've seen several discussions on stock vs Ricks Motorsport vs Roadstercycle?
  5. Is there a way to fix this and 100% prevent it from occurring again? (Other than selling and buying a newer GSXR :wink2:)


1. No. My regulator burned out on my 2007 600. I could smell it. When I got to the regulator I could see the burn. I replaced the regulator only and the bike was fine after that.

2. Installed my new one in the side position and understand it could give out in the future. Regulators fail on all sorts of bikes, not just GSXRs that have them mounted against the engine.

3. No, a mosfet chip is an electronic component that can fail like any other electronic component. This regulator is a hard working component as you have noticed the massive metal heat sink that is built onto the regulator.

4. I bought my new mosfet regulator for $25 on Amazon. It hasn’t failed in its year of operation (track riding). Since it was so inexpensive, I did buy another brand new spare regulator in case it ever fails on me at the track like the OEM one did.

5. No. Moving the electronic regulator and wires from against the engine block will help, but any electronic can fail.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Where to start...

Your battery is dickered. After a good charge, your battery should be WELL over 12.6V. 12.6V is the MINIMUM you should see on a serviceable battery after charge.

11.XX volts at 5k rpm is indicative of one of two things: either your stator or R/R is dickered.

Get your service manual and do the charging system tests.

1. You do NOT need to replace both stator and rectifier at once. Replace the bad component and the test the system, again, to see if everything is working properly.

2. Side-mounting the R/R is the OEM fix for their shitty decision to mount the R/R above the headers behind the rad. It is a better place for the R/R, but will not guarantee that the component will no longer fail. (These machines are 13 years old now, electrical issues abound)

3. MOSFET R/Rs are not magic fuckery. They work differently than "old school" rectifiers, but after reading some threads, I think the OEM replacement that dealers are selling are MOSFET, anyway. Disclaimer: if you ask me for the difference between the two, I may bore you to a coma.

4. Rick's has a good reputation on this site. I, however, always push people in the direction of OEM for replacement electrical... The OEM components are top notch, Suzuki just mounted the R/R in the wrong spot for a while and made an urban myth about their OEM electrical reliability.

5. No. You bought a 13 year old bike- expect issues.
1. No. My regulator burned out on my 2007 600. I could smell it. When I got to the regulator I could see the burn. I replaced the regulator only and the bike was fine after that.

2. Installed my new one in the side position and understand it could give out in the future. Regulators fail on all sorts of bikes, not just GSXRs that have them mounted against the engine.

3. No, a mosfet chip is an electronic component that can fail like any other electronic component. This regulator is a hard working component as you have noticed the massive metal heat sink that is built onto the regulator.

4. I bought my new mosfet regulator for $25 on Amazon. It hasn’t failed in its year of operation (track riding). Since it was so inexpensive, I did buy another brand new spare regulator in case it ever fails on me at the track like the OEM one did.

5. No. Moving the electronic regulator and wires from against the engine block will help, but any electronic can fail.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Thanks for the input everyone, greatly appreciated.

I've taken the regulator/rectifier off the bike and tested as per the manual with the following results. Manual on the left, my results on the right. Some of the numbers are a little lower, but they are all similar when tested - is this an issue?




Here is a photo of the back of the regulator/rectifier, which shows no signs of burnout:
 

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All of those stars in the chart mean that you should NOT get a reading when you put the leads on the connectors. Diodes are a "one way" street, so to speak. They allow current to flow only one way... until they fail. They have failed.

That R/R looks like a cheap knockoff. Time to drop cheddah on a quality R/R.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
All of those stars in the chart mean that you should NOT get a reading when you put the leads on the connectors. Diodes are a "one way" street, so to speak. They allow current to flow only one way... until they fail. They have failed.

That R/R looks like a cheap knockoff. Time to drop cheddah on a quality R/R.
Thanks for that, will be ordering a genuine replacement from Suzuki.

I'll check the stator for good measure too and post back results from that.

From what I can tell the broken reg/rec one looks to be a genuine part, it looks identical to what "genuine" ones for sale online look like and to the best of my knowledge it's not been replaced previously on the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Update: Tested the ohms reading on all possible combinations of the stator connector plug. When plugged in it initially showed a number and after a second all went to 0, so I am going with the reading being 0.

I was very briefly able to perform the unloaded test at 5,000 RPM and saw what looked like good numbers before the bike wouldn't run any longer due to the dodgy battery.

So I'll be ordering a new battery and genuine reg/rec from Suzuki to fix things and hope for the best!
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
All of those stars in the chart mean that you should NOT get a reading when you put the leads on the connectors. Diodes are a "one way" street, so to speak. They allow current to flow only one way... until they fail. They have failed.
How sure are you about the above statement highlighted in red?

I just picked up the brand new, genuine Suzuki regulator/rectifier from my Suzuki dealer and I am getting readings where a * is present on the test instructions. The readings are in some places almost identical to the old/suspected damaged reg/rec that has been on the bike to date.

Either this brand new, never before used and not even installed yet reg/rec is broken too, or you've got things wrong? See results:

 

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The manual indicates the *'s should read 1.4v or higher.
I know that if you use a standard multimeter, the results will be close, but often not the same as what the manual shows. If you use the Suzuki test meter you will get results that match the manual closer.
The results you are showing look pretty close to what I read on my own.
What readings did you get on the stator tests?
You will need a solid battery with full charge to get accurate readings there.
If you had the burnt connector, or burnt wires, I would suspect the stator is putting out too much voltage for the RR to handle, which often cooks the RR also.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The manual indicates the *'s should read 1.4v or higher.
I know that if you use a standard multimeter, the results will be close, but often not the same as what the manual shows. If you use the Suzuki test meter you will get results that match the manual closer.
The results you are showing look pretty close to what I read on my own.
What readings did you get on the stator tests?
You will need a solid battery with full charge to get accurate readings there.
If you had the burnt connector, or burnt wires, I would suspect the stator is putting out too much voltage for the RR to handle, which often cooks the RR also.
If your readings are similar to mine, and both the brand new genuine reg/rec and the one that has been on my bike show extremely close results, then I am lead to believe @MacBayne was wrong, and that actually my reg/rec is fine.

The reg/rec looks to be in perfect visual condition (see image in an earlier post above) and there are no burnt wires.

The ohms test for the stator came back perfectly normal, all readings at 0.

The unloaded test at 5,000 RPM with high beam on showed 65vac at one point, but I didn't have the chance to check all of the connectors as the bike cut out due to the dodgy battery and wouldn't restart.

I will be picking up a new battery tomorrow, and hopefully returning the brand new reg/rec for a refund, since I don't actually need it...
 

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When you do the ohms test between the yellow wires, you should have a very small number, but not 0. Make sure you have your meter set for the smallest scale.
When you do the ohms test between the yellow wires and ground, you should have 0 on all three.
65 vac is a good reading, though all three should be pretty close to each other.
 

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How sure are you about the above statement highlighted in red?

I just picked up the brand new, genuine Suzuki regulator/rectifier from my Suzuki dealer and I am getting readings where a * is present on the test instructions. The readings are in some places almost identical to the old/suspected damaged reg/rec that has been on the bike to date.

Either this brand new, never before used and not even installed yet reg/rec is broken too, or you've got things wrong?
My apologies. Those asterisks on the chart mean 1.4V or more. I didn't see the "legend" right below the box. In the electrical industry, an asterisk normally means O/L. That said, you still aren't getting all readings within spec.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
When you do the ohms test between the yellow wires, you should have a very small number, but not 0. Make sure you have your meter set for the smallest scale.
When you do the ohms test between the yellow wires and ground, you should have 0 on all three.
65 vac is a good reading, though all three should be pretty close to each other.
Sorry I should have clarified, the ohms test I performed was the yellow wire to ground, of which all 3 had 0. The ohms test between the yellow wires had a small reading that was not 0.

My apologies. Those asterisks on the chart mean 1.4V or more. I didn't see the "legend" right below the box. In the electrical industry, an asterisk normally means O/L. That said, you still aren't getting all readings within spec.
Yeah looking at it again that's how I now see it too - those with a * in the chart should be 1.4v or more - but why would a brand new reg/rec not show the correct 1.4v reading as per the legend?
 
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