Suzuki GSX-R Motorcycle Forums Gixxer.com banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is it important to get formal training for riding motorcycles? What kinds of training have you had and how did it help your riding?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,133 Posts
Absolutely. I'd say after a MSF course, track day courses are your best bet.

Or just be like the influx of squids, buy a supersport with little or no riding experience, ignore advice and report back in a week to say that you're comfortable because you've been riding everyday. :rolleyes
 

·
Uses squid tentacles as a butt-plug
Joined
·
262 Posts
The most important thing to riding in my opinion is training. I'm young and lots of people I ride with are too "proud" to get formal training. These friends have also put a R1 into a sidewall while doing a wheelie. Almost a full body cast for months. Riding is fun but its a dangerous sport. I recommend to start with the MSF course it will give you very good low speed maneuvering practice as well as much more to include braking swerving etc. Then hit up a motorcycle school and look what they have to offer ive taken classes anywhere from riding with a passenger to defensive driving on a motorcycle. All of them have made me a better rider and much more comfortable on my ride. For faster high speed maneuvering and corners to really show you the limits of your machine take a bunch or track day courses. it gets expensive but your life and hobby are well worth it.
 

·
Hand-Eye Coordinator
Joined
·
6,527 Posts
Formal training is super effective.

I teach the (Canadian Equivalent) MSF and anyone whose boyfriend/buddies tried to teach them first usually have already dumped their machine and is scared of the 9hp bikes we set them up with and are thus, slower learners.

Anyone who knows how operate a motorcycle will benefit from a trackday/course.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,303 Posts
Track days and courses will make you a MUCH more confident and smoother rider ...

That being said seat time on the road in vastly different environments will make you a better rider too ,and will help you with staying alive in traffic/rain/loose surfaces/emergency situations !!!

All these things together will make you a much better/competent rider ...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,583 Posts
I did L1 & L2 California Superbike School.
It astounded me how late they get you to turn in in L1.
At first I thought there is no way I could turn in that late but before the end of the day I was dragging knees for the first time.
L2 was all about vision and opening up field of view and perception.
I still practice all that stuff every ride. Expensive but worth every cent.
 

·
Uses squid tentacles as a butt-plug
Joined
·
262 Posts
Also RIDE IN THE RAIN. Take the bike around the block slowly feel the difference in traction and braking. You dont have to ride in the rain if you dont want to on a regular basis but its good to know if you get stuck somewhere and it starts raining your comfortable to get home. I really think this is overlooked ALOT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I did L1 & L2 California Superbike School.
It astounded me how late they get you to turn in in L1.
At first I thought there is no way I could turn in that late but before the end of the day I was dragging knees for the first time.
L2 was all about vision and opening up field of view and perception.
I still practice all that stuff every ride. Expensive but worth every cent.
Great to hear that everyone that commented is on board with training. I learned to ride from friends and started racing immediately after with no training and while I did alright and was reasonably quick I had a lot of crashes and never knew why. It wasn't until I took all four levels of the California Superbike School that I realized how important fundamental skills were to riding and how much quicker and safer of a rider it could make you. My racing career took off and then I was able to become a riding coach with the school. Love your comment about how is it expensive but worth every cent, because it really is an investment in your own riding and personal safety. If one course prevents just one riding crash or accident it could literally save your life!

So why do you think some people choose not to get further training? What prevents you from seeking more or how do you go about deciding what amount of training you should invest in and from where?
 

·
Uses squid tentacles as a butt-plug
Joined
·
262 Posts
Great to hear that everyone that commented is on board with training. I learned to ride from friends and started racing immediately after with no training and while I did alright and was reasonably quick I had a lot of crashes and never knew why. It wasn't until I took all four levels of the California Superbike School that I realized how important fundamental skills were to riding and how much quicker and safer of a rider it could make you. My racing career took off and then I was able to become a riding coach with the school. Love your comment about how is it expensive but worth every cent, because it really is an investment in your own riding and personal safety. If one course prevents just one riding crash or accident it could literally save your life!

So why do you think some people choose not to get further training? What prevents you from seeking more or how do you go about deciding what amount of training you should invest in and from where?
I believe arrogance and ignorance prevents people from seeking training. They think they are already good enough and dont need anymore. If you found the money to purchase a two wheeled vehicle you can find the money for training. I would say you NEVER have enough training. You stop training when you stop riding. Even if you take the same course taught by another person you will learn different skills or hone in on the ones you currently have. Practice makes perfect but nobody is perfect so we will ALWAYS need practice. If you've exhausted all resources and taken every course you can find then track day regularly and learn more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I believe arrogance and ignorance prevents people from seeking training. They think they are already good enough and dont need anymore. If you found the money to purchase a two wheeled vehicle you can find the money for training. I would say you NEVER have enough training. You stop training when you stop riding. Even if you take the same course taught by another person you will learn different skills or hone in on the ones you currently have. Practice makes perfect but nobody is perfect so we will ALWAYS need practice. If you've exhausted all resources and taken every course you can find then track day regularly and learn more.
Really love this, especially the part about how you can never get enough training. Even the top guys in the world seek training and help in finding time where they can't see time....Great points! I recently had some training from Troy Corser at Aragon in Spain and picked up some things that made a lot of sense and I've also done some flat tracking with Colin Edwards and the Rich Oliver Mystery School...hoping I can do more and will always try and learn from reputable others :):cheers
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,303 Posts
I believe arrogance and ignorance prevents people from seeking training. They think they are already good enough and dont need anymore. If you found the money to purchase a two wheeled vehicle you can find the money for training. I would say you NEVER have enough training. You stop training when you stop riding. Even if you take the same course taught by another person you will learn different skills or hone in on the ones you currently have. Practice makes perfect but nobody is perfect so we will ALWAYS need practice. If you've exhausted all resources and taken every course you can find then track day regularly and learn more.
Speak for yourself ...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Really love this, especially the part about how you can never get enough training. Even the top guys in the world seek training and help in finding time where they can't see time....Great points! I recently had some training from Troy Corser at Aragon in Spain and picked up some things that made a lot of sense and I've also done some flat tracking with Colin Edwards and the Rich Oliver Mystery School...hoping I can do more and will always try and learn from reputable others :):cheers
Anyone reading this thread may be interested in what is known as the "Dunning-Kruger Effect". Simply put, it it the tendency of the inexperienced to overrate their skill level, and the extremely competent to underrate it. The lower one's skill level, the greater the tendency to vastly overrate their performance level.. So much so that there is a term for the huge gap between perceived skill level (say 99/100) and actual skill level (say 20/100).. The gap is called "Mount Stupid". MotoGP riders are the best in the world, yet they are constantly training, constantly learning, although they are all 1 in a million riders. With them in the mix of the total population of riders, how could I view myself as anything but "a bit below average in the total population". I watch Motogymkhana riders and am humbled by their low-speed mad skills as well. I hope I will always keep learning, whether by tutor, or by scooter. I can explain it to ya, but I can't understand it for ya.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Anyone reading this thread may be interested in what is known as the "Dunning-Kruger Effect". Simply put, it it the tendency of the inexperienced to overrate their skill level, and the extremely competent to underrate it. The lower one's skill level, the greater the tendency to vastly overrate their performance level.. So much so that there is a term for the huge gap between perceived skill level (say 99/100) and actual skill level (say 20/100).. The gap is called "Mount Stupid". MotoGP riders are the best in the world, yet they are constantly training, constantly learning, although they are all 1 in a million riders. With them in the mix of the total population of riders, how could I view myself as anything but "a bit below average in the total population". I watch Motogymkhana riders and am humbled by their low-speed mad skills as well. I hope I will always keep learning, whether by tutor, or by scooter. I can explain it to ya, but I can't understand it for ya.
Ohhhh fascinating! I find it so interesting when people boast and brag about their riding ability in a room full of people when they have absolutely NO IDEA the skill level of those in the room and it usually turns out that they are the worst riders of the bunch! I just wish more people would see the benefit of continuous training! As you say, the very best riders in the word are the ones that continually put in the effort to become even better when riders that have NO clue what they are doing will balk at spending any kind of time/money on improving their own riding ability. There are often people that spend so much money on making their bikes lighter and and faster and chasing suspension round and round when they would get better results simply going to a track day or riding school and focusing on being a better and safer rider!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top