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Another big thing is to remind your passenger to take off any rings, wathces, braclets etc... they scratch the hell out of the tank!
 

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Great thread. I am with you, i would just assume have that seat empty and keep the seat off of mine. My wife only wants to ride sometimes because we always eat good while riding.
 

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fRaGgLe said:

I use the clutch very little, its even easier on a bike (I rarely use it in the cage too).

when you are almost ready to change, apply pressure, back off a tiny amount, welcome to the next gear

Going down the box is pretty easy too - blip the throttle a little AFTER applying pressure, and you are suddenly in the right gear again
Fraggle,

I have a couple of questions (sorry for the stupidity everyone, but just trying to get a grasp).

1) You referenced using the clutch very little in "the cage". What is "the cage"?

2) For the rest of your information, you are saying that when we're ready to change [gears], that we apply pressure and then back off a bit (upshifting), now are you talking about the clutch (applying the pressure and backing off) or the actual shifter to change the gears? If it's the shifter, won't it grind going into the next gear under a certain amount of a load? I mean, I know to shut the throttle down when shifting, but still there is torque on the gears, correct?

I mean, on MX bikes I've speed shifted and gone clutchless but I'm wondering if it's different on a street bike. Seems to me there is a lot more torque upshifting on a street bike, ya know? I'd just be afraid of grinding the gears and/or hitting the next gear and the bike taking off like a rocket cuz I didn't think it would shift gears.

Just figured I'd ask. Only way I'll learn is to ask, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #24
MX_Demon said:

fRaGgLe said:

I use the clutch very little, its even easier on a bike (I rarely use it in the cage too).

when you are almost ready to change, apply pressure, back off a tiny amount, welcome to the next gear

Going down the box is pretty easy too - blip the throttle a little AFTER applying pressure, and you are suddenly in the right gear again
Fraggle,

I have a couple of questions (sorry for the stupidity everyone, but just trying to get a grasp).

1) You referenced using the clutch very little in "the cage". What is "the cage"?

2) For the rest of your information, you are saying that when we're ready to change [gears], that we apply pressure and then back off a bit (upshifting), now are you talking about the clutch (applying the pressure and backing off) or the actual shifter to change the gears? If it's the shifter, won't it grind going into the next gear under a certain amount of a load? I mean, I know to shut the throttle down when shifting, but still there is torque on the gears, correct?

I mean, on MX bikes I've speed shifted and gone clutchless but I'm wondering if it's different on a street bike. Seems to me there is a lot more torque upshifting on a street bike, ya know? I'd just be afraid of grinding the gears and/or hitting the next gear and the bike taking off like a rocket cuz I didn't think it would shift gears.

Just figured I'd ask. Only way I'll learn is to ask, right?
heh heh

1) The Cage is my car - an ancient BMW, I rarely use the clutch going "up", and only about 50% of the time going down the box. After 80,000 miles of this "treatment" its still "sweet".

2) Pressure is on the shifter, just before you want to shift, apply pressure to the shifter, back off a little, and the shifter will shift the gear for you. I too have ridden dirt bikes for a long time, its pretty much the same, except that you are a little gentler...

yes - its cool to ask
 

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Cool, thanks for letting me know...just practiced the shifting today..but on my MX bike (on the track of course) heehhehe...so I'll just relate that to the Gixxer when I pick it up next Sat.

This is going to be the longest damn week of my life....I HATTTTTE WAITING!!!!!


Hehehe

Thanks for the info Fraggle!

PS If you still MX in So-Cal, let me know..maybe we can meet at the track sometime.
 

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First time somebody rode with me on a streetbike.....I can still remember my nuts getting crushed when I depressed the brakes.....their helmet slamming in the back of mine when I upshifted or downshifted.....Good stuff and good editorial.
 

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Sometimes, I find that passengers (unless they've piloted bikes before), don't understand what it is to 'look into a turn'. That is precisely the advice to give, but I word it as: "When we go into a turn, look over my shoulder in the direction we are turning." That seems to take a lot of the wobble out of the curve because they aren't trying too hard to lean for me. But I have to admit that riding in Sacramento (as anywhere, I suppose) is so damn dangerous that I realy dislike carrying passengers.
 

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i always thought that the passenger was supposed to lean a little in the opp. direction of turning. like im leaning right and they look over my left shoulder so not to add extra weight to the lean? i would think this would be safer but am i wrong?

o well im tryin to gte the woman to get a bike so i dont have to haul her on the back. i feel so vulnerable w/ a passenger and i cant do shit cause i got a extra 120 lbs. on the back.


i would never ride w/ any 1 else on the back though. the girl is the only exception.
 

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Sig said:

</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by fRaGgLe:
<strong> </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by genetix:
<strong>hmm...do you let the passenger get on the bike first, or do you get on first?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">If you can figure a way of getting the passenger on first, I want to see the video <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="images/icons/wink.gif" /> </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">If they are a fairly small light passenger they can get on first with the kickstand down. Not exactly great for the stand but if they are fairly light it shouldn't be an issue.
at gas stations and stuf my ex gf would stay on the bike while i got off
 

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You want the girl to lean in the opposite direction? Wouldnt that counter any force that you were generating by leaning? I always felt like the bike turned much easier if the passenger helped me a little with the leaning duty but in the same direction that I was leaning in.
 

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Yeah, any weight that gets transfered over the center axis of the bike will initiate a positive or negative force depending on your point of view. If I am entering a left-hander and my passenger looks over my left shoulder (and I have put pressure on the left bar like I'm supposed to), all force vectors are aiding me in the turn. If however the passenger is gawking at the scenery and is leaning or looking right, I'll have to counter those forces. If a passenger leans (I mean putting weight towards the left side of the bike) it can throw the pilot off a bit, so I understand the concern there. This is precisely why I have them "look" instead of "lean". I tend to brief my passengers to look over my shoulder, but to keep their body right over the center axis of the bike. And all this trouble is why I hate taking passengers. Luckily the other half is usually out-gunning me up the road...
 

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yeah i didnt mean actually leaning the opposite direction but sitting somewhat upright like if we wree going straight and not leaning in ANY direction. i feel that when the pass. i sleaning with me im at greater risk of falling cause 2 people leaning instead of 1 is more force put on the bike . but thats just how i think. i could be wrong but o well----------------
 

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what you said is what i was trying to explain to my girlfriend who is gets scared and confused about what to do. I ll be sure to show her this. THANX!
 

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I am in the same boat as a few of you by the sounds of it, in that I do not like to ride with a passenger. I had my ex-girlfriend on the back (GF at the time) and she decided to put her foot down going through a decreasing radius left-hander in town running about 35 or so. Luckily I never felt the jerk when her foot hit. She told me that she had put her foot down when we got to the gas station, needless to say I wasn't very happy. She was not new to riding on the back, she just said that she wasnt paying attention....something for everyone to keep in mind when hauling a passenger.
 

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fRaGgLe said:



Traffic filtering (if you live in CA) is fun, but scares the shit out of passengers even if you have told them that it is legal, filtering on the I5 at 140mph will get you a slap <img border="0" title="" alt="[Smile]" src="images/icons/smile.gif" />
What do you mean by "traffic filtering" ?
 

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Ive taken my girl on some good rides...She seams to have gotton over the fear of the turns ok....I did notice when she put her hands on the tank instead of around me...the breaking was much easier on me....Its still fun and she loves it.....
 

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I have ridden with with many different girls on the back and I find that a quick 2 minute convo pointing out all the stuff fraggle mentioned helps a lot. A couple quick bullet items before a ride can be the difference when keeping the rubber side down
. Thanks fraggle
 
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