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Discussion Starter #1
I very, very rarely carry a passenger nowadays, its something that I do not mind doing, it more that my wife hates being on the back, so its something that I hd fogotten about...

Last night I took a friend to the (not so) local bike night, and suddenly remember much of the stuff that I take for granted....

1) Before you take anyone on the back, make sure that they are dressed for the occasion. This is Leathers, Boots, Helmet, Gloves, sturdy Jeans at minimum.

2) Give them a pep talk. there are a few things that they need to know..

2.1 Never put your feet down, even at a stop.
2.2 Never attempt to get off, unless I am aware that you want off, especially never try to get off when we are moving.
2.3 Look THROUGH the corners.
2.4 Never fight the lean, but do not over-lean too. Keep yourself upright in relation to the bike.
2.5 NEVER fidget or move about in corners
2.6 Don't panic

I then arrange a seating position, my wife like to place one hand on the tank, and one behind her to brace against the acceleration and braking.

My friend from last night prefered the arms wrapped tight around me - both work well.

Work out an "I'm scared" signal - wife headbuts me, my friend thumps my chest


Then there comes the actual ride.

First off the extra weight screws up the performance, my rule of thumb is to take it 2-3K higher in every gear to compensate, and generally be in one gear lower than normal around town.

Braking distances are extended, and cornering ability is impaired, so generally you are going to be rider slower, leaving bigger gaps, and having a more slugish machine.

Next on the list is your attitude....

Traffic filtering (if you live in CA) is fun, but scares the shit out of passengers even if you have told them that it is legal, filtering on the I5 at 140mph will get you a slap


Remember that most people are used to car acceleration, so keep it down initially at least, because they will simply not be prepared for it.

Again Braking on a bike is vicious compared to a car, so they will not be ready for it.

Gear changes are a difficult thing when you have a passenger, clutchless will be smoother, assuming you are good at it already. Otherwise you need slower more labourious ones to cushion your passenger a little.

Finally, when you get to your destination, ask them what they liked, and did not like, and learn from the feedback.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Originally posted by genetix:
hmm...do you let the passenger get on the bike first, or do you get on first?
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">If you can figure a way of getting the passenger on first, I want to see the video
 

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One other thing that I have noticed that works for me with a passenger on is to use the rear brakes first to slow the bike down some then finish braking with the front. This will lessen the inertia the passenger feels and not throw them forward onto you.
When I first rode a passenger and having her body weight push against me from behind almost made me lose my balance.
 

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take a minute to show your passenger how to put one or two arms around you and where to place them on the heel of the tank for braking.do this a few times before you move.even a 125 pound person pushing there weight on your back when braking hard seriously impairs your ability to manage the controls i.e. handle bar input.years ago i had a gal who let her hand slip off the grab bar during hard braking (to avoid a stray dog)and the immediate increase of weight supported by my arms seriously hampered my ability to swerve.she had her license at the time and also was a experienced driver. just a momentary lapse not even a rookie mistake. take all the time necessary to make your passenger feel comfortable and make sure they understand what YOU expect
 

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Originally posted by fRaGgLe:
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by genetix:
hmm...do you let the passenger get on the bike first, or do you get on first?
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">If you can figure a way of getting the passenger on first, I want to see the video
</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">If they are a fairly small light passenger they can get on first with the kickstand down. Not exactly great for the stand but if they are fairly light it shouldn't be an issue.
 

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Originally posted by fRaGgLe:
Gear changes are a difficult thing when you have a passenger, clutchless will be smoother, assuming you are good at it already.
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">now, i will sometimes not use the clutch on a car, and I've wondered about bikes, and I'm interested in trying it...is there anything special to think about?

Is it similar to shifting in a car?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I use the clutch very little, its even easier on a bike (I rarely use it in the cage too).

when you are almost ready to change, apply pressure, back off a tiny amount, welcome to the next gear


Going down the box is pretty easy too - blip the throttle a little AFTER applying pressure, and you are suddenly in the right gear again


With a passenger its all the more important to be smooth, and IMHO its easier to be smoothe clutchless (up the box) than by using it.....

Going down the box with a passenger is a different matter - at least for me, I tend to use more engine breaking with a passenger, so clutch control becomes more important....
 

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Hey bro my wife dont like to ride. I kinda wish she would ride with me on some short trips in the area.

2001 Blue/White gixxer 1000 no mod yet
 

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yeah my girl friend gets scared as hell riding on the back but its kind of good cause i dont really like riding with a passenger anyway. ive only been riding for like 4 months and have logged about 2.5 k miles but im a pretty decent rider by myself and can handle my 99 600 pretty well. but when i ge the girl on the back (about 120 lbs 5'9") my bike feels like shit. its hard to turn and come to a stop without a little bit of wobble. maybe just cause im new it feels that way. oh and i let my cousin ride on the back one time (160lbs) and my little 600 felt like a XR50. it was so damn slow i couldn't believe it. i think ill need a 750 to carry passengers.


im bored and just thought id share.
 

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Remember a couple more things:
  • DO NOT give rides until you can ride youself. Just because you can ride around the block does not qualify you to give rides.
  • Always when giving a ride to anyone (male or female) their arms need to be around you. I have seen people fall off holding on the that "grab rail" under normal accelleration, if having another guys arms around you makes you feel gay you don't need to be giving him a ride. that "grab rail" acts as a fulcrum (pivot point) and their body will rotate right around it.
  • Adjust your suspension for the added weight of the passenger. It should be set up for you so riding passengers means adjusting the rear shock and forks.
  • On Sport bikes like ours have your passenger wrap their arms around you and place one hand palm down on the tank and grasp the wrist of that hand with the other. this allows them to put pressure on the tank under braking instead of your back and also keeps the dings out of the back of your 600.00 helmet.
  • Have them look over you inside shoulder when going through turns. It helps with the proper lean.
  • Have fun! Keep the Stunts for Solo riding. Nothing is worse than picking sombody off the ground cause they where trying to impress some girl with how well they can wheelie at 70+mph and they have to go to the ER cause they did not have the right gear on and are now covreed in road rash.
    Bones
 
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