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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I thought I'd start a new thread. I bought this bike in '86, turned it into a superbike with a ton of mods I did to the motor and chassis over the years I raced it. It last ran in '92 and has been stored in the dark, dry temp controlled basement of my shop. I may be selling my building in the next few years and it's time to clean up and either ride the bike or find a new owner. Either way, I want to get it running and I thought I'd share what I'm doing.

With 1074 miles on the clock I stripped it for racing. I also had an '87, '88, '90 750 and 1100, and a '91 750. I raced them all. So I posted in the classifieds that I'm either going to make this bike streetable or possibly part with it, I haven't decided. I'm old at 73, and have an '07 600 that I ride on occasion. So here's some photos of my '86. Take into consideration, I've not cleaned up, attempted to stage and do a photo shoot for a sale. I just quickly wiped off some dust and shot some photos. The body work has been off for a few years now.











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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Whether I keep the bike or sell it, which is more likely at this point. I'd like to start it so I could be certain of it's running well and also, I think it would give a prospective buyer confidence. I've taken some steps toward that goal and it's been enjoyable. I removed the cam cover on Sunday and did another inspection of the cam area as I did nearly 10 years ago and all looked wonderful. As expected, no signs of any corrosion, rust or anything that may impact perfect running that I could see. I dripped a bit of fresh oil on the cams, cam chain, rocker arms and tops of the valves, put the bike in 2nd gear and bumped the back tire a bit and could see cams easily move. I only allowed the cams to move a few degrees to test that the motor was free. I'm not worried about the bottom end as I believe most motorcycle manufacturers build the cranks and rod big ends to deal with long periods of storage. I've found the first thing to bind up a motor is the rings rusting to the cylinder which is caused from condensation pooling between the cylinder and piston crown. This results from temperature changes, day to night, day to day or seasonal. It's a problem for a bike stored even in a garage. I've never seen it in a dry climate when stored indoors as my bikes have been.

This bike has a pretty radical Megacycle intake cam a #12 and had a slightly less radical exhaust #10. Reference numbers are from recollection decades ago, lol. Riding on the track, proved the cam choice did not give me what I wanted as the potential to make power far exceeded the motors ability to rev. I kept the OE igniter for reliability and rev limiter. I knew if I decreased the overlap and got better cylinder fill down low, I could make more upper midrange power which is what I wanted. I researched cams and it just so happened that a stock '88 short stroke exhaust cam may work perfect. I bought one and installed it in place. I had also slotted my cam sprockets so I could play around with cam timing to alter the power characteristics, which I did. This combination seemed to work perfect. I had all the low end grunt I could ask for and it pulled scary fast as the revs started building. I remember driving out of some turns and actually short shifting to keep the power controllable.

So you can notice the underside of the cam cover as it was pulled. Spotlessly clean and no signs of condensation. Yesterday I disassembled the carbs. They are 36mm Mikuni RS Radial Flatslides. The mains are 135 and pilots 20. This jetting was perfect at 4200' likely around 95 degrees, velocity stacks, 771cc, Dayco 110 race gas. They were spotless inside with all the pilot jets clear and no signs of varnish or residual fuel deposits. The floats and needles were perfect as well. Last time I raced the bike, I ran out of gas on the last lap 100 yards from the finish line and coasted across then pushed my bike into the pits. The outside of the carbs had a few fuel stains that cleaned up really well and the whole set looks new and should work as good. I feel like I'm reliving my days of prepping and tuning before a big race day, this is fun.








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I thought I'd start a new thread. I bought this bike in '86, turned it into a superbike with a ton of mods I did to the motor and chassis over the years I raced it. It last ran in '92 and has been stored in the dark, dry temp controlled basement of my shop. I may be selling my building in the next few years and it's time to clean up and either ride the bike or find a new owner. Either way, I want to get it running and I thought I'd share what I'm doing.

With 1074 miles on the clock I stripped it for racing. I also had an '87, '88, '90 750 and 1100, and a '91 750. I raced them all. So I posted in the classifieds that I'm either going to make this bike streetable or possibly part with it, I haven't decided. I'm old at 73, and have an '07 600 that I ride on occasion. So here's some photos of my '86. Take into consideration, I've not cleaned up, attempted to stage and do a photo shoot for a sale. I just quickly wiped off some dust and shot some photos. The body work has been off for a few years now.











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Thanks for the pics Nick
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yesterday with the help of my son, we got the bike out of the basement of my shop where it's been stored for 30 years. It's cool 50 to 70 year round, dark and vey dry so the bike looks very well preserved. Even raw, unplated steel parts don't look rusty, where I turned down some fasteners to lighten, drilled lightening holes, drilled for safety wire, etc. It was a job, and it's in the back of my shop where it's well lighted, tools are accessible and I have everything needed for freshen it up.

I put back the cam cover I removed a few days ago and used new o-rings for the head cooler fitting adapters. I drained the motor oil from the pan and the oil cooler and was delighted to see no signs of water from condensation that is usually the first thing to drain as it is heavier than oil. The oil was still transparent with a green tint as it was when new 30 years ago. Any moisture will generally make it opaque and milky, which can also be a sign that internal motor parts may have started to become damaged.

After work yesterday I drove 110 miles round trip to buy a couple of gallons of 110 octane VP race gas. I did not want to risk starting the bike on premium pump gas for the few minutes I'd be running it. I topped up the Dot 4 fluid that feeds the brake and clutch masters. I'll also clean the front of the frame with the cooler removed. Everything is certainly looking better once the dust is removed and it's in good light. I'm getting excited to start it which will be next week sometime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Day off but I went into the shop today. I'm actually enjoying working on what may be my favorite bike of all I've owned. I removed the pipe so I could clean up the frame a bit and gain easy access to the oil filter which I removed and installed a Fram that's sitting on a back shelf for longer than 30 years. I forgot, but the box still had a price tag on it, maybe I'll post a pic next time. I also examined the oil cooler was going to straighten fins and remove rocks and bugs, but it needed little of either, I did spray it down with an emulsion cleaner on the outside and rinse it with clear water. I used diesel fuel to wipe down the front of the frame. It's pretty much inert and will not spot or attack the aluminum frame. My pipe was clean and dry without signs of corrosion, surface rust or any oily residue so I left it as it was and reinstalled it. I've probably said it before, but I'm really pleased with everything so far and it's looking better than I imagined. I did replace one hose from the master cylinder reservoir to the clutch master and bled it. I'll replace the brake feed hose too next time I work on it. I'll wait and put the alternator back on after I start the bike the first few times and install the battery and wire it in the circuit. A pic of the bike in action with the original fork on, billet adapters and Nissan calipers.
 

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Day off but I went into the shop today. I'm actually enjoying working on what may be my favorite bike of all I've owned. I removed the pipe so I could clean up the frame a bit and gain easy access to the oil filter which I removed and installed a Fram that's sitting on a back shelf for longer than 30 years. I forgot, but the box still had a price tag on it, maybe I'll post a pic next time. I also examined the oil cooler was going to straighten fins and remove rocks and bugs, but it needed little of either, I did spray it down with an emulsion cleaner on the outside and rinse it with clear water. I used diesel fuel to wipe down the front of the frame. It's pretty much inert and will not spot or attack the aluminum frame. My pipe was clean and dry without signs of corrosion, surface rust or any oily residue so I left it as it was and reinstalled it. I've probably said it before, but I'm really pleased with everything so far and it's looking better than I imagined. I did replace one hose from the master cylinder reservoir to the clutch master and bled it. I'll replace the brake feed hose too next time I work on it. I'll wait and put the alternator back on after I start the bike the first few times and install the battery and wire it in the circuit. A pic of the bike in action with the original fork on, billet adapters and Nissan calipers.
Thanks for the update Nick you’re doing great so far can’t wait to hear that thing rip hopefully when you’re on the road bring back some memories I’m sure it will.110 miles wow that’s so far just for some race fuel but you’re doing the right thing thanks for your dedication and passion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Can I suggest that you throw the Fram filter in the trash and put a Suzuki filter on it? I may even have one, if you need it.
I sold Fram filters and also EMGO for most bikes, back in the 80's and '90s, was not aware of any issues. The V&H GSXR racers looked to be sponsored by Fram. I'm guessing they may have been OK then? Or maybe we just didn't know. Any I can buy locally that are better? What brans may be acceptable. The bike will just be started and if driven, just around the block. It's not legal or licensed. And the wheels may be suspect, the shock likely flat, etc

Speaking of that, do you still have the original Brembo reservoirs?
I don't remember if I/we (a machinist friend) made the flat tops with the inlet fittings. I likely would not have thrown them away. I'm using a Brembo remote dual outlet res.
 

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I was a Honda dealer back in the late 1980s. Back then, I took a look at how several aftermarket filters were constructed, and compared them to the OEM Honda products, by cutting them apart and seeing what was inside. There were significant differences. The materials used in the FRAM filter were garbage, the pressure relief spring operated at a different pressure, etc.

Obviously, I have not dissected every filter they ever made but I saw enough that I wouldn’t use them. In that same vein I also saw countless problems from people substituting different spark plugs from different manufacturers. Back then, you had charge that would give you equivalent spark plugs across all of them manufacturers product ranges and I can’t tell you how many problems we solved by swapping out some aftermarket plugs, usually from a US company, and putting up set of standard NGK or ND plugs in the engine.

Likewise, I never saw issues with OEM coils or wires, why people changed those I have no idea. I recently pulled off a set of Nology coils and wires off of a bike I’m working on, I’m going to put OEM components back on.

And don’t get me started on air filters. The factory filters are far better than the aftermarket stuff, like K&N. I’ve been close friends for 50 years with one of the two guys that invented those filters, the “N” in K&N… Norm McDonald. He and his partner Kenny invented those back in California a long time ago to keep rocks and dirt clods out of dirt track sprint car motors and desert/Baja runners. They were better than no filter at all, but they were not intended to do what they eventually were marketed for.

In any event, I will not use any oil filter on one of these other than the Suzuki filter that came on it originally. To add to that, I only buy parts like that from a Suzuki dealer. I have quite a few friends that are still in the service business and there are a ton of counterfeit products flooding the market, both in aftermarket packaging from large companies like Bosch, or OEM dealer packaging. They are impossible to spot until you get them in your hands and even then, some of them will fool you, unless you cut them apart and look inside. Life’s too short for me to put up with that crap.

One interesting factoid that I have never seen explained is why Suzuki put a larger volume oil filter on the 750 motors, as compared to the 1100 motors. They know something I have yet to figure out…

You can obviously buy one from any Suzuki dealer, or I can send you one that I have in stock. My cost on them is around $15, I think retail is something in the low $20s. If you end up buying the starter clutch, they can ride together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It looks like Fram has bounced around a lot over the years as far as ownership. The one I put on my bike is NOS, says Allied Automotive, Fram, Bendix, Autolite on the box, along with made in USA. Don't know if that makes a difference, also says "New vehicle warranty requirements met..." bla, bla, bla, BS. Could USA be better before they may have outsourced and cheapened quality?

I still have my old Fram filter that's had oil in it for at least 30 years and from peaking inside it, the pleats are still intact as is the relief valve, which is a good sign, I guess. You convinced me however, if I was to run the bike more than a few minutes, race it, start riding it, to change it out. I'll advise the next owner.

The Suzuki dealer used to be 2 blocks away from where my shop's been since '71. They are now about 17 miles away and do not stock the filter I need.
 

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Most Suzuki dealers don’t stock very many parts at all. Ever since I can remember, I’ve kept more parts in stock for these bikes than any Suzuki dealer ever did.

Like I said, I’d be happy to send you a filter. If you want to just start the bike and run it for a few minutes, I’m sure the FRAM filter would be OK for that, assuming that its the correct filter for that motor.

The FRAM filters I took apart, 30 years ago or so, were made long before all the US companies started outsourcing their crap to China. I can’t imagine the filters have gotten any better, even back then they were built down to a price and that’s the biggest problem I had with them. I’m not going to risk a $5,000 or $10,000 investment on a filter that saves me a couple bucks… Especially when I can see that the quality isn’t the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A few days ago I removed the spark plugs, all were difficult and very tight. I did spray some PB Blaster lube around the bases and let it penetrate as I broke each plug loose before fully removing each one. They eased out fine and thankfully no metal transfer which I've seen on '99 up Harleys before. All looked great with a dry light greyish tan color burn. I did turn the motor over a couple of revolutions carefully using the starter clutch bolt as I thought I could get a more sensitive feel if there was any resistance as opposed to using the back tire. All felt good. I did put power to the starter from a fully charged battery, but the starter clutch did not engage, just freewheeled. I could see 2 of the rivets were loose. Javadog was kind enough to send me pics of the clutch and explain its workings and likely need for replacement. I ordered the puller tool, pulled it and noticed one rivet head was completely sheered off on the inside and the two castings of the clutch body were quite loose. I was concerned about where the rivet head went and if it was pulverized or still whole.

I cut my oil filter apart and searched and found nothing, not even any small fragments of flakes. The original Fram filter looked amazingly good, I thought. The paper pleats were still holding firmly to the cellulose or cardboard end pieces, the elastomer flapper was still pliable, all the glue, adhesive looked to still be holding everything together, the relief valve still functions and finally, I did a test to check the integrity of the internal threads. I found a threaded stud the same diameter and pitch of the filter and put it in my vice. I tried to wiggle and pull the filter off and even used a mallet to knock it off. I'm convinced I could not do it. This assures me there was little chance of the Fram filter blowing off form oil pressure. The Fram filter I just installed was 30+ years old and should be of the same quality as the one I just cut apart.

I used a magnet and found the missing rivet head on a ledge inside the case. While deciding what to do, I pulled off my rear wheel and inspected it as best I could. I don't have x-ray vision but everything I could see did not look like there were any signs of degradation and it's still good air pressure. I'd feel comfortable to ride the bike down the street but would do more specialized testing before riding the bike daily or racing it. It's hard for me to fathom something looking perfectly intact, strong, with what seems to be its original integrity, then crumbling into a pulverized mess a fraction of a second later. I don't know or fully understand the properties of magnesium, but have read precautions for years, more so recently pertaining to motorcycle wheels.

The cush drive looked really good with the rubbers and steel bushings looking good enough for several more races. If I was a pro with employed techs and an endless supply of expendables, I'd likely replace them after every race. The sprocket and carrier looked great as well, with signs showing normal tooth wear, studs and nuts still tight. This gave me a chance to check out the rear caliper, mounting arm, and rotor that all looked fine. I did clean off a bit of sticky chain lube from the inside area of the swing arm and put the wheel back on.
 

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Couple warnings about tires that look fine on the outside… I once restored a car over a period of years and replaced a set of tires that had been previously installed on the car and never used. They were maybe a dozen years old, I can’t remember. The car had literally never been driven in the time that the tires were on the car. They looked flawless.

When it came time to finish the car, I decided to put a brand new set on. When we mounted the first one on the tire machine to break the bead, the part of the machine that pushed on the tire went right through the side wall…

Another time, I decided to take one of my 930s about two miles down the road pick up a pizza. The tire had less than 10,000 miles on it, The car was kept in a air-conditioned and heated garage and the tires were kept properly inflated but they were probably about 12 years old. Looked fine…Didn’t make it back from the pizza place, the tire failed.

You just never know.

No question that you need a new starter clutch, I still have one sitting on my workbench, if you want it.
 

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When I bought my 86 it had a Dymag on it. Likely from the early 90's. I called them up and they told me under no circumstances would they recommend running the wheel on the street or the track. That being said, if your mags have zero signs of corrososion, I would guess they are fine for the track, but the street it might be sketchy with potholes and such.

I had a set of Marchensini wheels that were only 12 years old and they needed to be repainted. I figured I'd have them tested since there were signs of corrosion which is what causes cracks. What I discovered is the testing is highly specialized and requires the paint to be stripped, then the wheels need to be have a chromate treatement to prep them for paint or powder and create a chemical corrosion barrier, paint alone will not do this. All in it was cheaper and less hassle to sell them on the cheap and buy new mags.
 
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