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Take it to a reputable race service/support shop and have them set it for you. Suspension adjustment is a science/art form. Take it to some one who does it for a living. It will be money well spent. A basic stock suspension adjustment shouldn't be more than $50 if that. Basic rebuilds with springs, valving, oil, and/or modifying the shim stack can start around $750 and goes up from there depending on the quality of componants you want to use. Your generation shock is actually a decent shock and has rebuild kits for it. Sorry this doesn't really answer your question. But asking for suspension settings is like asking someone for a copy of their map for your PCIII. Meaning that all bikes are different and all suspensions will work differently.
 

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Setting Sag:

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Forks:

This is essentially the difference between your suspension being fully extended and then naturally compressed with you sitting on the bike. You need 3 people to do this right, and you also need to be in full gear (but not including helmet) whether that be weather suit or race leathers, boots, gloves, back protector etc. Make sure that you have paper and pen on hand before you start!
In order to set the SAG properly, the motorcycle cannot be on any front or rear stand as it must have both wheels on the ground. To set the correct SAG on the forks, 2 people must hold a handlebar each and lift the front end in order to extend the forks to their maximum length (figure 1). The person measuring (metric tape measure is easier) must pick a point to measure from (traditional forks should be measured from the base of the triple clamp to the shoulder of the lower fork leg leg, and upside down forks should be measured from the shoulder of the upper leg to the end of the chrome tube where it enters the axle casting.


ONCE YOU HAVE PICKED THE POINTS TO MEASURE FROM, DO NOT CHANGE !
Once the measurement for the forks at full extension has been recorded, the rider is then required to sit on the bike. The rider climbs aboard with feet on the ground until the person holding the bike upright at the rear (using whatever is solid on the rear of the motorcycle) has a firm grip. The person holding the bike then instructs the rider to put his feet on the pegs and pull on the front brake lever to keep the bike stationary. The person doing the measuring compresses the front suspension by pulling down on the handlebars and then lets the bike settle. The second measurement is taken using the same two points used previously, and that number is recorded. Simple math of the larger minus the smaller number will provide you with the SAG number.

As a general principle, the front fork SAG should be approximately 32 to 38mm. If there is more than 38mm, preload, if available, can be added. Turns clockwise add preload. If all the available preload is added and the resulting number is still greater than 38mm, then the fork springs are too soft and need to be replaced.


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Shocks:
To set the correct SAG on the shock, 1 person must grab the sub frame and lift the rear end in order to extend the shock to its maximum length. The person measuring (metric tape measure is easier) must pick a point to measure from the center of the rear axle to a point on the plastic (using contour lines, edges of decals etc helps). This measurement must be as straight a vertical line as possible!

ONCE YOU HAVE PICKED THE POINTS TO MEASURE FROM, DO NOT CHANGE !
Once the measurement for the shock at full extension has been recorded, the rider is required to sit on the bike. The rider climbs aboard with feet on the ground until the person holding the bike at the front (using the upper triple clamp is easiest) has a firm grip. The person holding the bike then instructs the rider to put his feet on the pegs and pull on the front brake lever to keep the bike stationary. The person doing the measuring compresses the rear suspension by pushing down on the rear of the bike and then lets the bike settle. The second measurement is taken using the same two points used previously, and that number is recorded. Simple math of the larger minus the smaller number will provide you with the SAG number.

As a general principle, the rear SAG should be approximately 28 to 32mm. If there is more than 32mm, preload (if available) can be added using the appropriate tool(s). Those shocks with ramp adjusters (eg: Yamaha R6 OEM shock) have limited preload, whereas some with lock rings (Penske, Fox, Ohlins, WP) have a great deal more adjustment. If you add more than 5 turns of preload on a rear spring the spring will become harsh, so that is a good indication that you have the wrong spring on the bike.

Note:
Also note that some springs are straight rate (have the same rate throughout their range of movement), whereas others are progressive rates (where the rate increases during the shock travel). It is better to have a straight rate spring if you are considering racing.
 

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Tuning Forks
Note:
Not all forks share the same adjustment characteristics, so please take a look at the forks to see what adjustment you have.


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PRELOAD:

This adjustment is always found on the top of the forks. Clockwise increases preload, counter clockwise decreases it. The adjusters are usually integrated into the fork cap and are sometimes differentiated by color. The preload adjuster may have adjustment lines machined into it so that you can compare to check that they are even.


Preload is initially used when setting SAG. Preload can be added if the rider experiences the forks “diving” under hard braking. A more accurate way of assessing “dive” is to attach a thin zip tie on the slider tube (make sure that it slides easily but is not sloppy), or place an appropriately sized rubber “o” ring on the tube that slides into the fork leg (using an O- ring will require one fork being removed).


The zip tie/O-ring will allow you to see how much of the fork travel you are using. If the zip tie/O-ring is firmly against the dust scraper or on an inverted fork, the axle casting, then the fork is bottoming out. In that case you need to add more preload, and then check the zip tie/O-ring again. If the zip tie/O-ring rests 5mm prior to the dust scraper or axle casting, this indicates that you are using almost all of the available travel.

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REBOUND:

The rebound adjuster is usually located in the center of the preload adjuster, and commonly requires a flat head screwdriver to be used for making adjustments (there are exceptions like Ohlins which require Allen wrenches). Sometimes the adjustments are measured in “clicks”, other times in degrees of turn. Usually OEM settings are in the middle of adjustment.


First, turn the rebound adjusters all the way in on both forks and write down how many turns/clicks there were. Then take the rebound adjustment all the way out on both forks so that you know how much total adjustment there is. With the adjustment all the way out, hold the front brake on to lock the wheel and then push down vigorously on the forks. As the forks begin their upstroke, let them move naturally and observe the action of the fork. The stroke may come back and then return into the downward motion once more, and may even return again on the upstroke (do not let go of the front brake while doing this!!).
Then adjust the rebound all the way in on both forks, repeat the pumping action with the front brake fully engaged and observe the difference in the range of motion –the forks will rise back up slowly. What you are trying to achieve is the fork rising back almost to the top of the first rebound stroke and staying there. You will need to work the adjusters so that they are always the same on both legs until you have the rebound action set correctly.

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COMPRESSION:

These adjusters are usually found on the underside of the fork or close to the brake calipers at the bottom of the fork facing the rider. They commonly require a flat head screwdriver to be used for making adjustments (there are exceptions like Ohlins which require Allen wrenches). Sometimes the adjustments are measured in “clicks”, other times in degrees of turn. Usually OEM settings are in the middle of adjustment.


First, turn the compression adjusters all the way in on both forks and write down how many turns/clicks there were. Then take the compression adjustment all the way out on both forks so that you know how much total adjustment there is. With the adjustment all the way out, hold the front brake on to lock the wheel and then push down vigorously on the forks. You will be able to feel the way in which the forks move through the downward/compression stroke, which will be fairly easily (do not let go of the front brake while doing this!!).
Then adjust the compression all the way in on both forks, repeat the pumping action with the front brake fully engaged and observe/feel the difference in the range of motion –the forks will compress more quickly and will not travel as far on the compression stroke up. What you are trying to achieve is the compression stroke allowing the fork to move without restricting the amount of travel in the fork, which causes the sensation of “packing”. You will need to work the adjusters so that they are always the same on both legs until you have the compression action set correctly.

NOTE: compression adjustment is very subjective compared to the rebound adjustment because the compression adjuster is usually difficult to see. It takes a lot more "feel" when making adjustments, which will take time to acquire. Also note that compression can be used in tandem with preload adjustment to help prevent the forks bottoming out. This is not the right solution to the bottoming issue, but one that helps in the interim.
 

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Shocks:

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Not all shocks share the same adjustment characteristics, so please take a look at the shock to see what adjustment you have. Also note the shock can come with no oil/nitrogen reservoir (eg: SV 650), with a piggy back oil/nitrogen reservoir built into the shock (eg: GSXR’s) or with a remote reservoir (eg: Penske, Fox, Ohlins)


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PRELOAD:

In the SV650 and R6, it is a simple ramp adjuster that can be moved using the OEM tool. Clockwise increases preload, anti clockwise decreases it.
Other shocks may have two rings, the upper serving as a lock ring. The lock ring can be moved using the OEM tool and the second ring can be moved clockwise or counter clockwise to adjust preload accordingly. Should the OEM tool be missing the trusty mallet and flat blade screwdriver will work to loosen the lock ring and adjust the second ring. Spray some lubricant onto the threads on the shock body to ease movement (eg: WD 40).
Some shocks require the use of a specific tool (eg: Penske) that must be present for any preload adjustments to take place.
Preload is initially used when setting SAG. Preload can be added if the rider experiences front forks becoming light or getting a “headshake” under hard acceleration. This causes the bike to squat on the rear wheel and alters the weight distribution on the front and rear wheels. Preload can be added to reduce this problem.

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REBOUND:

The rebound adjuster is usually located in the center of the hasp locating the shock to the rear suspension linkage, and commonly requires a flat head screwdriver to be used for making adjustments. Sometimes the adjustments are measured in “clicks”, other times in degrees of turn. Usually OEM settings are in the middle of adjustment. Other rebound adjusters are rings at the bottom of the shock shaft that turn clockwise and anti-clockwise. Check to see what system you have!


First, turn the rebound adjusters all the way in and write down how many turns/clicks there were. Then take the rebound adjustment all the way out so that you know how much total adjustment there is. With the adjustment all the way out and the bike comfortably balanced between your legs, compress the shock vigorously by bouncing on the seat and applying all your weight to this motion. As the shock begins the upstroke, let it move naturally and observe the action. The rebound stroke may come back very quickly to cause the shock to top out (maintain the balance of the bike while doing this!!).
Adjust the rebound all the way in, repeat the same action with the bike comfortably balanced between your legs and observe the difference in the range of motion –the shock will rise back up slowly. What you are trying to achieve is the shock rising back to the top of the first rebound stroke naturally, not quickly or not too slow (or the rear end will “pack” in causing removal of weight from the front wheel) and staying there. You will need to work the adjuster until you have the rebound action set correctly.

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COMPRESSION:

This adjuster is usually found on the upper section of the shock and it commonly requires a flat head screwdriver to be used for making adjustments. Sometimes the adjustments are measured in “clicks”, other times in degrees of turn. Usually OEM settings are in the middle of adjustment.


Firstly turn the compression adjuster all the way in and write down how many turns/clicks there were. Then take the compression adjustment all the way out so that you know how much total adjustment there is. With the adjustment all the way out sit on the bike and balance it between your legs, then push down vigorously compress the shock. You will be able to feel the way in which the shock moves through the downward/compression stroke, which will be fairly easily (keep the bike balanced while doing this!!).
Then adjust the compression all the way in, repeat the compressing action with the bike balanced between your legs and observe/feel the difference in the range of motion –the shock will compress more quickly and will not travel as far on the compression stroke. What you are trying to achieve is the compression stroke allowing the shock to move without restricting the amount of travel of the shock shaft, which causes the sensation of “packing”. You will need to work the adjusters until you have the rebound action set correctly.
NOTE: compression adjustment is very subjective compared to the rebound adjustment which is very easy to see. It takes a lot more feel when making adjustments, which will take time to acquire.

EXCEPTIONS:
For shocks with remote reservoirs, there are differing ways to adjust compression. Some have high and low speed circuits separated by different controls, or one control mechanism. In instances such as these, you may want to refer to the manual provided by the manufacturer, or contact the manufacturer for guidance. If all else fails you can email us here and we can help you!
 
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