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Discussion Starter #1
Well, had to sell my bike late in 2016 purely for financial reasons and because I had to move from LA to Bay Area (oh yeah, and the frame was bent, it was my salvage rebuild project I decided to keep instead of my nice 04 600:facepalm) and now it's been 2,5, almost 3 years since then. Have been thinking about getting a bike again. Now it seems like there are a lot of choices and many bikes I raved about such as fz09s etc are available used on CL. I also thought about getting an sv650 but seems like there are almost no good ones left - all are clapped out and beat on. What would you suggest getting now, in 2019? I would like something good for commuting (roughly 20 miles each way) but also sporty and popular meaning with readily available oem and aftermarket parts?
I'm open to naked or even some comfortable supersports.
 

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Captain Obvious ... because obviously it’s obvious
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There are a ton of options, from the S1000R to the new GSX-S1000, Z1000, the Ninja 1000 if you want an upright bike, the newer Concours if you want a ZX14 in touring form, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, exactly, a lot of options. I just think that these upright liter bikes might be too much to restart my riding "career". I'm more interested in middleweights now, something confidence-inspiring and not getting me scared shitless, especially not something absolutely insane like s1000r.
 

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Captain Obvious ... because obviously it’s obvious
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Then you can look at something like the FZ-07.
 

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18+ GSX-S 750; so misunderstood and overshadowed by the GSX-S 1000 that you won't have problems getting one for cheap. Sporty enough to have fun with, has that awesome GSXR intake growl and they are very good on gas for your commute.
 

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Don't forget insurance. Compare premiums between different models mentioned above. Sometimes you will be shocked at the difference. I always prefer popular bikes to for better aftermarket support. I hear the Triumph nakeds are awesome, but buying stuff for them is hard to find and expensive.
 

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NYYYYYAHHHHHHHHHHHHH!
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Street Triple RS
still hands down the best midweight naked. and now they come in 765cc.
tonnes of torque for awesome street riding and insanely comfey for the daily commute.

if you want a 1K try the speed triple? supposed to be awesome the new one. haven't ridden on though.
 

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Street Triple RS
still hands down the best midweight naked. and now they come in 765cc.
tonnes of torque for awesome street riding and insanely comfey for the daily commute.

if you want a 1K try the speed triple? supposed to be awesome the new one. haven't ridden on though.
The RS is cool but... The M50 calipers and Ohlins shock will not make that much of a difference compared to the regular R which already comes with radial calipers and the same big piston forks. If you're planning on upgrading the suspension the RS does make sense though; then it's only the forks and spring for the shock you'd have to worry about.

However, as a Triumph owner (D675R); I'd go with a Japanese bike every day (if/when Suzuki comes with an updated GSXR 750, only requirement from me is ABS, the Daytona is gone). Aftermarket and parts availability is leagues ahead for the Japanese bikes. Obviously, not a problem if you want to keep the bike stock. In my case I was between the ST765RS and the GSX S750; the price difference allowed me to get a Brembo RCS19 master cylinder, SS brake lines, Matris cartridges,double clicker Matris shock, frame sliders, windshield and there is still left over for a slip on and other goodies. I'm well aware on the track the ST765 will be faster and more flickable than my S750, but it is more than fast enough in the street, gets awesome MPGs and I have the peace of mind of parts being available easily.
 

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NYYYYYAHHHHHHHHHHHHH!
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The RS is cool but... The M50 calipers and Ohlins shock will not make that much of a difference compared to the regular R which already comes with radial calipers and the same big piston forks. If you're planning on upgrading the suspension the RS does make sense though; then it's only the forks and spring for the shock you'd have to worry about.

However, as a Triumph owner (D675R); I'd go with a Japanese bike every day (if/when Suzuki comes with an updated GSXR 750, only requirement from me is ABS, the Daytona is gone). Aftermarket and parts availability is leagues ahead for the Japanese bikes. Obviously, not a problem if you want to keep the bike stock. In my case I was between the ST765RS and the GSX S750; the price difference allowed me to get a Brembo RCS19 master cylinder, SS brake lines, Matris cartridges,double clicker Matris shock, frame sliders, windshield and there is still left over for a slip on and other goodies. I'm well aware on the track the ST765 will be faster and more flickable than my S750, but it is more than fast enough in the street, gets awesome MPGs and I have the peace of mind of parts being available easily.
the R is a 675, the RS is the 765, theres about 15% difference in power between the two. its not just suspension & paint on this generation of the bikes.

the RS comes with a brembo MCS master cyl, so you don't need to upgrade it to and RCS (its like having an RCS 19 20 21 all in one because you can select the ratio you want)
the brakes are beyond amazing, i reckon it would outbrake my 1000R, the feel is certainly much much better.
I'm really surprised you didn't notice much of a difference between the bikes especially with the suspension, i've ridden both and was pretty disappointed with the zook, was hoping the suspension from the 1000R would get re-valved and put on the GSX-S series but it hasn't happened, it falls well short of the mark IMO.
i'd pick the RS any day, then just soften the suspension up a bit for street riding. but then again everyone has their tastes.

i will agree on parts being more scarce than jap bikes, 100% agree, but there is still a tonne of support.

i just re-read this comment and i feel like it comes across as argumentative, genuinely not intending to do that.
 

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Honestly if you want a solid user friendly bike to ‘knock the rust off’ with ... Honda’s CBR500R is a great option.

Cheap and reliable ...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Honestly if you want a solid user friendly bike to ‘knock the rust off’ with ... Honda’s CBR500R is a great option.

Cheap and reliable ...
hmm, and why not. seems perfectly fine and I'm probably going to be able to resell it later with no money loss. I'm also thinking about some cheap vstrom650, those bikes seem to have survived better than their sv650 cousins.
 

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the vstrom is actually suzukis best selling bike in AUS ^
 

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I would like something good for commuting (roughly 20 miles each way) but also sporty and popular meaning with readily available oem and aftermarket parts?



Yamaha MT-09 seems to be a great commuter bike that won't bore the shit out of you. The engine isn't too small and not too big and that crossplane triple sounds the business. :cheers
 

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the R is a 675, the RS is the 765, theres about 15% difference in power between the two. its not just suspension & paint on this generation of the bikes.

the RS comes with a brembo MCS master cyl, so you don't need to upgrade it to and RCS (its like having an RCS 19 20 21 all in one because you can select the ratio you want)
the brakes are beyond amazing, i reckon it would outbrake my 1000R, the feel is certainly much much better.
I'm really surprised you didn't notice much of a difference between the bikes especially with the suspension, i've ridden both and was pretty disappointed with the zook, was hoping the suspension from the 1000R would get re-valved and put on the GSX-S series but it hasn't happened, it falls well short of the mark IMO.
i'd pick the RS any day, then just soften the suspension up a bit for street riding. but then again everyone has their tastes.

i will agree on parts being more scarce than jap bikes, 100% agree, but there is still a tonne of support.

i just re-read this comment and i feel like it comes across as argumentative, genuinely not intending to do that.
FYI, Triumph is selling three versions of the Street Triple 765; the base model "S" with non adjustable suspensions, floating calipers and dash from the 675; R with fully adjustable suspensions (pretty similar to the previous 675R), color TFT dash, radial calipers with brembo MC and upgraded power and finally the RS, which gives you the M50 calipers, big piston fork, and Ohlins shock. The RS does have a slight power increase over the R, but not as dramatic as the power increase from the R over the S. I guess Triumph was trying to do something similar to the Monster lineup on which every level adds a bit of power?


More on the rationale behind getting the S750 over the 675RS...

if I had gone with the ST I would have kept the OEM master cylinder, even though its a mass produced Brembo, not an RCS, but on the S750 it had to be upgraded, it's by far the worst part of the bike (and first bike ever I've felt compelled to upgrade the MC, it is THAT bad). As for the suspension... The stock one on the S750 is acceptable, the forks are not THAT bad (suprisingly so), the shock is awful; I could very well have done with only an upgraded shock... But upgrading the shock would only highlight the forks limitations, so I went full retard and got aftermarket suspension all over, which puts it well ahead of the factory installed suspension on the RS (BPF are very good, so is the shock, but just the fact I have springs for my weight give it an edge). Engine wise the S750 can keep up very well with a 765 up to 125mph or so; it's deceptively fast because of how smooth and linear the power delivery is (probably smooth to a fault), past 125mph the Triumph will run circles around it... But really who cares going that fast on a naked bike? I like control, thus my focus on suspension, twisties and got a naked bike because the full faired bikes just make it really easy to go stupid fast between corners; the S750 does that just fine, it's not a track bike although I've already taken it to the track, it was fun, but it will live 99% of the time on the street.

There is something else I didn't mention, which was crucial on my choice... Peace of mind. The Daytona makes all sorts of noises you'd never hear from a Japanese bike, some good like that intoxicating exhaust noises I can't get enough of; some that make for pucker moments, like when the hydraulic cam chain tensioner drains and the engine sounds like its about to blow up on startup. This is only exacerbated by heat, 675/765 run stupid hot! I'm not saying Triumphs are unreliable; I've done nothing but routine maintenance on my Daytona, but it just doesn't inspire confidence like the Suzuki does.


Out of the box, stock, even the mid-range 765R is better than the S750; no question about that, probably even the base model S765 (never looked into that one because of the floating calipers, which will require a fork swap to get rid of). But I always take all factors in consideration, and the price difference opens the door for a lot of upgrades on the Suzuki.
 

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hmm, and why not. seems perfectly fine and I'm probably going to be able to resell it later with no money loss. I'm also thinking about some cheap vstrom650, those bikes seem to have survived better than their sv650 cousins.
Two things to consider on the V-Strom:

1. First two generations are as wide as a bus if you install panniers on them. Not a problem if you don't split lanes, but you're from California.

2. Suspension is undersprung; badly.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Two things to consider on the V-Strom:

1. First two generations are as wide as a bus if you install panniers on them. Not a problem if you don't split lanes, but you're from California.

2. Suspension is undersprung; badly.
1 is not a problem if I don't install the pannier)
2. racetech had gold valve simulators. Can swap in the new springs. Although this can add to the cost and might make it more feasible to get a different bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Out of the box, stock, even the mid-range 765R is better than the S750; no question about that, probably even the base model S765 (never looked into that one because of the floating calipers, which will require a fork swap to get rid of). But I always take all factors in consideration, and the price difference opens the door for a lot of upgrades on the Suzuki.
Curious how older street triples compare to s750. The way you describe it, if older 675s are at least 90% comparable to new ones, then they might be worth getting over the s750.
 

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sv1000s k7 , while they have much more power than a 650, they handle decently, it certainly won't rip your arms off, my brothers got one , made 109hp with its ýoshi mufflers, i made him a two into one header and used one of the yoshi mufflers, gave 121hp, handles sweet as long as your not too heavy, i had the sv 650, it handled ok, but very limited power wise, I think it only had 63hp with a free flow exhaust.
 

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1 is not a problem if I don't install the pannier)
2. racetech had gold valve simulators. Can swap in the new springs. Although this can add to the cost and might make it more feasible to get a different bike.
Gen 3 bikes do not have that problem, the exhaust is lower and it clears the panniers. As for the springs, almost all bikes benefits from correct springs, but I consider springs to be required on any bike and part of the purchase price. Nothing beats the V-Strom as a budget tourer, as a commuter it gets amazing MPGs and it has a huge tank; if you plan on taking a passenger nothing under 1000cc matches the V-Strom's passenger accommodations, nothing. The pannier thing was a deal breaker for me when I got my Versys, coming back from a long trip at the end of the holiday season meant splitting lanes and the V-Strom just couldnt do that; now that the Gen3 is out, I'd have got the V-Strom any day. It's a brilliant commuter, the best budget tourer, easy on gas, huge tank, awesome aftermarket, tried and true bulletproof engine and as it shares tire sizes with the 1000+ ADV bikes you have as many tire options as you can want (wherever you are someone will have one in stock). Yes, I have 3rd Gen V-Strom envy.


As for the older ST 675R... The 765 is not really that much faster than the 675**, comparing a 675R to a 765R the older one is 90% if not more of of the 765R; some people like the the 675 better because its a lighter, faster revving engine. The only reason I didn't look into those was the fact I couldn't find any used 675R with ABS that was not a gray market bike.

**Final drive gearing is taller on the 765. Same thing happened to the 18+ S750; both of them are faster than their predecessors in lower gears, but in top gear is a different story. I suspect this had to do with emissions or mpg/C02 regulations; Euro IV to m ake it short.
 
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