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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 04 600 track bike, and under heavy braking tend to get decent chatter. I was wondering if there's a way to prevent this? If either by ways of suspension or something else... I know schwantz told us (at his school) just pull the clutch in and let it back out, but it can be a bit tough when you're really running back down the gears to take that pause.

I typically just wait for the chatter to go away, which it usually does as I begin my lean.

Any comments or suggestions?
 

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It could be suspension related, but more than likely, it's caused by technique. In most cases, as you downshift, you're forcing the rear wheel to instantly slow down to match engine output speed. If your roadspeed and engine speed don't agree - your rear wheel's going to skip along the pavement until they do.

Most people shift too early - they start downshifting as soon as they get on the brakes. If this applies to you, try to seperate the two actions. First brake - when your speed allows for a smooth downshift, shift. Brake some more... shift again. Of course, things are happening alot faster on the track. But if you slow things down a bit, you may find that you're rushing into shifting when you don't have to. Some turns require that you start downshifting immediately upon braking, but some (most) don't.

Slipping the clutch, which is the same thing you're doing by letting the clutch out slowly like Schwantz probably taught you, allows your rear tire to slowly match engine output speed on downshifts. It works great... but practice, practice, and more practice is the only way to get the hang of it.

working on correctly 'blipping the throttle' is another technique to reduce rear wheel chatter and smoothly work your way down the gears. What you're doing there is increasing the engine output speed as you shift - to match the roadspeed.

To get everything right - most people use all of these techniques in combination.

Sometimes a little chatter is hard to avoid. We have one turn at Firebird - you come flying into it high up in 3rd gear, have to brake late ('cuz everyone else is), and get down into 2nd hard before turn entry. I still chatter a little there - it's hard not to. But as long as match speed & stop the chattering before you're leaned over far enough to potentially eat shit... it's no biggie.
 

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gixxers are pronre to chatter. make sure you engine speed is up (blip the throttle) and see a good suspension guy.

if its when you enter turns i doubt its and engine issue

did i mention i love my slipper clutch
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think I was just downshifting a bit too soon... I'll be at VIR May 2nd, so I'll definately try it then. I don't think I'm at the stage to go see a suspension guy or deal with that stuff. I'm just going to learn to ride the piss out of my stock 600
Thanks
 

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Mine chattered also but the suspension guy told me it was cause of my rear stock spring rate, I need a heavier rear spring and shock.
 

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Mine chattered also but the suspension guy told me it was cause of my rear stock spring rate, I need a heavier rear spring and shock.
Dude... no offense, but I think you need to fire your suspension guy!

I can think of 10 likely reasons you'd experience rear wheel chatter. But too light of a spring in the rear would not be one of them.

Between that & your fork problems... I'd start looking around for a replacement
 

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yea to stiff i think would do it. unless he thinks it was packing in i guess

to soft you would see running wide on exit under throttle
 
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