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when i down shift and i suck at rev matching since i only been on the bike for 2 days.. the bike makes a big clanking noise and a sudden deceleration.. is it suppose to do that???? and any tips on downshift and revmatching techniques so i don't do that? and also.. when i down shift into 1st sometimes it just make another clanking noise and i haven't release the clutch yet.. is it suppose to do that??

and i have 2003 gsxr 600
 

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Mine does all of the above.
I at the higher rpms take the tension off the trans, by accelerating a little, take some practice, but the cluck is a lot less noticeable and quitter.

Yes, minedoes the first gear clunk, with clutch in.
But not at low speed. Basically if it make the cluck with the clutch in.
and you let it out the back tire may lock up momentarily.
Not sure, as I have not let it out to see. But I venture to say it will.

I've ridden mine this way for 2 years and all seems fine so far.

As far as rev matching
As far as I know you gonna have to use the clutch for that.
What you need to do is.
Change gears, watch how far the rpms fall.
Then Whe atempting to rev match, Pull the clutch in, rev up to aprox. the amount they fell on the up shift, and let out the clutch a little quicker that it takes to start out.
Note: the higher your rpms are before down shifting, the more rpms you neeed to rev before down shifting.

You'll figure it out.

Sorry if it's kinda hard to understand, but I just do it by "feel"

Hope this helps

My bike is an 02' Telefonica GSXR 600
 

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Chubby Chaser
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<----------loves his slipper clutch
 

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After down shifting out of second and coming to a light I go from second right into netural.
What if you have to move quick as to not get hit or run over?

I am always in gear when on the street and stay away from netrual.
 

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After down shifting out of second and coming to a light I go from second right into netural.
What if you have to move quick as to not get hit or run over?

I am always in gear when on the street and stay away from netrual.
Yeah, shouldn't ever have to be in neutral.
 

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when i down shift and i suck at rev matching since i only been on the bike for 2 days.. the bike makes a big clanking noise and a sudden deceleration.. is it suppose to do that???? and any tips on downshift and revmatching techniques so i don't do that? and also.. when i down shift into 1st sometimes it just make another clanking noise and i haven't release the clutch yet.. is it suppose to do that??
and i have 2003 gsxr 600
big clanking noises are not good... Neither is sudden deceleration since your taking a chance at locking the rear, which if you've been on the bike 2 days will probably be a very very bad thing...
When you downshift PROPERLY, there will be no clanking, it will be very smooth... The engine breaking should stay about the same as it was in the gear before.. If your getting a LOT of engine breaking, you downshifted too early... As for rev matching, it just takes a little practice.. Basically as your squeezing the front brake to slow down, when you get to the point you want to downshift, just "blip" the throttle a bit. As the RPM's start to come back down from the blip (it's a very short blip, maybe 3-4000 RPM) you'll slide the clutch out. It should match right up and be smooth as butta with a little practice. As for "clunking" when you put it in first.... Make sure your clutch is adjusted properly... Then make sure your oil level is good, make sure it's not over the "-F" mark.... With that being said, it will always make a little "clunk" when you drop it in, but it should be anythign major... If you've checked the two things above, then what your experiencing is probably normal.
 

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Here is your "R"
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Wide open throttle and down shift gear by gear, try to get all your down shifting before the turn then get on the brakes before the turn.
 

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I usually get off the gas and feather the clutch (pull in slightly) and you will hear the transmission start to match the speed...I pull it in maybe one or two times until I hear the engine brake and deacreas in speed...This happens very quick...Sounds like "Vrrooomm...Vroomm..It will take a little practice to get the feel of it...Make sure you are off the gas...
 

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What you have to keep in mind, if your bike has a new transmission (either new engine or just a new bike) it will be very "tight" for the at least the first 500 miles. So the gears tend to "clunk" heavily at first. It will eventually loosen up. Also, the travel from 1st-2nd or 2nd-1st gear has to pass thru neutral so it seems like it is an even longer "clunk" but really you just have to move the shifter farther. But just some basics on gear shifting...

You can ride 1st gear all the way up to about 60-70 MPH before it starts to hit the limiter, but you don't want to bang it out like that unless you're doing some serious riding. So follow the manufacturers suggestion for shifting until you get a good feel for shifting. Suzuki recommends the following shift schedule:
Shifting up
1-2 12mph
2-3 19mph
3-4 25mph
4-5 31mph
5-6 37mph

Shifting down:
6-5 31mph
5-4 25mph
4-3 19mph

This is a very conservative shifting schedule and doesn't get you in the meat of the powerband, but you don't need the meat of the powerband in your first couple of weeks/months of riding. It works very well for city riding though. Once you get ready, all geared up, taken a MSF course, get comfortable with your bike's user inputs. Then you can ride your gears out to the top of the powerband in a very squidlike way.

Also, when you up shift make sure you return your throttle all the way back to the stop. Notice I said "return" and not "chop". The difference being "returning" is smoothly rolling your throttle back to stop. While "chopping" is letting the tension in the throttle cable retract it back to it stop point. Remember SMOOTHNESS is key in good shifting and good riding. At the same time you're returning your throttle you should be disengaging you clutch (pulling the lever in) and then you flick the shifter up in a forceful manner. Don't treat it like a girl, you want to make sure you engage that gear fully.
If you ever find yourself shifting up from 1st and 2nd and then realize your revving your bike like crazy b/c its in Neutral, then you are not putting enough pressure on your shifter when you're going up thru the gears.
Then you once you have shifted up, you start to roll on throttle as your clutch is passing thru the "friction zone" as you engage it (releasing your lever). That is releasing it and not letting it pop back out. Remember SMOOTHNESS? Smoothness doesn't not mean slow either. You can do all this smoothly in less than 1/2 second. When observing a skilled rider you might notice the movement of their ankle.
You know you have upshifted SMOOTHLY if:
1. You felt no engine braking. If you did then you didn't roll your throttle on as you released the clutch lever through the friction zone.
2. You didn't feel a sudden jolt of acceleration. If you did, then you rolled on too much throttle while the clutch was disengaged. Or you may have popped your clutch while rolling on throttle. Popping your clutch is just letting it slam itself back into place. That'd be a good thing you were trying to wheelie though.
3. Your bike only slightly bounces on its suspension. If you felt no bounce at all, then you are just too damn good and you should just enter yourself in a couple races. But it should almost feel just like your riding in a manual transmission car. You shift and everybody in the car heads drops just slightly and then lifts up again, like they are nodding. The only way to prevent that slight surging feeling is to get your revs matched perfectly with road speed. Which is very possible and is pretty easy when you're riding in the city. The challenge is doing it when you're trying to eek out every bit of hp in every gear. But you don't get many chances to practice that on the street.

How do you do a good downshift? Well, there are a ton of threads here that mention "blips." Blip the throttle for EACH downshift. What does that mean? Well, let's put it like this, if you haven't mastered shifting up, then blipping is a little beyond your capabitlities. But can easily be learned through practice. You have to master the art of front braking and throttle control. They should be COMPLETELY independent of each other. You should be able to brake and not move the throttle one millimeter. Just as you should be able to twist the throttle without braking a bit while your index and middle fingers rest on both the front brake and the rest wrapped around the throttle..
Basically a blip is just a slight rev in the engine speed in order to increase the engine speed to match the transmission speed you are trying to attain.

Think about it like this. If you were going 40 mph in 5th gear, your engine may be at 4500 rpm. Well if you wanted to do the exact same speed in 4th gear your engine will have to be at say, 5250 rpm. So what would happen if you just shifted without blipping the throttle? The transmission would have to speed up to make the 4th gear down shift. That's why you want to blip the throttle to make the engine speed match your road speed. Oh you could still make the shift into the gear, but you are on your way to destroying your transmission.

So to downshift for beginners...I say beginners because this isn't accounting for trail braking etc. This is just straightline downshifting like you're coming to a red traffic light. First off, you should never rely on engine braking to slow your bike. Try to make it a habit of using your brakes to slow you down. The brakes were made for braking, the engine was made for accelerating. It will build your brake confidence and finesse.
Disengage your clutch (pull it in). At the same time you should engaging your front brake with your index and middle finger. Your other fingers are used for throttle control. Now, just slightly with your palm roll on the slightest throttle. 2-3k rpms. It should sound like VROOOOM. Then roll off, but as you're rolling off. Flick down into the gear. At this point if you weren't coming to a complete stop. Then you could slightly roll on throttle as you engage your clutch (release lever) through the friction zone. But if you were coming to a complete stop. You should continue braking and then as your road speed decreases you should blip your throttle again and then downshift. Repeat until your in first gear with your feet on the ground and the clutch still disengaged.
How do you know you did the downshift right?
1. You have minimal engine braking. If you do then you have to remember to roll on gas while letting off the clutch.
2. Your rear tire didn't lock up. If it does then hold on. No, but if it does then you were in too low a gear for your road speed.
3. You felt the slight bounce and smoothness on the suspension. Then you're all set and try to repeat it for every gear up and down!

Now, if you are on steady ground (i.e. not a hill) and surrounded by cars at a busy intersection, feel free to put it in neutral and talk to the girl in the car next to you in traffic. But as a safety note, it is said you should keep your bike in gear just in case a driver behind you decided he doesn't see you and tries to rear end you. The car will win. So if you are unfortunate to find yourself in that situation always check your mirrors as you reach a complete stop to make sure the car behind you sees that your stopping.

I hope this helps to make your shifting smoother and less clunky. It all will come in time, but its good to actually know what's right and have a focus on what to practice.
A last note, never shift while cornering.
 

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All I do is let off the gas about half way, pull in the clutch, downshift, apply a little throttle as I quickly ease the clutch back out. The idea is to have very little engine breaking. You can hear it and it should be all smooth as your matching the needed rpms to the speed of the bike. This leads into a stable turn with the engine at a good point to accelerate out of the turn.

If you do it wrong, your back tire will chatter or skid as you enter the turn because your engine breaking too much. Slippers are nice now that I have one, but its still possible to get out of hand with it to.
 

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1fastrps13 said:
when i down shift and i suck at rev matching since i only been on the bike for 2 days.. the bike makes a big clanking noise and a sudden deceleration.. is it suppose to do that???? and any tips on downshift and revmatching techniques so i don't do that? and also.. when i down shift into 1st sometimes it just make another clanking noise and i haven't release the clutch yet.. is it suppose to do that??

and i have 2003 gsxr 600
it just takes time. you can try all the tricks in the book but the only true way to accurately rev match is to know exatly when to downshift, how to ease your clutch, and when to get back on the gas or ease in more brake. when you learn your bike better you will notice a difference. until then, go easy on her...
 

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I'm no professional, but when it comes to rev matching while downshifting, that should decrease the amount of clanking noise you here coming from your tranny. One thing you could also do is carry a slightly higher speed when downshifting to alleviate some of the pressure off of the tranny. Back to the rev matching while downshifting, if you are trying to master blippin the throttle (rev matching the engine to rear wheel speed to reduce rear wheel chatter), it takes a little practice but eventually it will become second nature. That means giving the engine a quick rev right before engaging the clutch when in the correct gear for the speed that you are going.
 
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