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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm pretty knowledgeable with some aspects of fabrication but when it comes to prepping and painting....I know I've got alot to learn! So I prepared my swingarm for priming (or so I think I did). I sanded it with a course pad (rough scotch brite type pad), then with 100 dry then wet sanded it with 220 and primed with automotive primer for metal/wood/fiberglass.
If you look at the pics, after one primer coat 18 or so hrs later, I went over it with dry 220 (very little effort) and in some spots the primer came off very easily - especially on the edges (obviously - most hand pressure) but in some parts, notably the flat sides of the arms, the primer seemed to stick really well.
What I want to know is am I doing this right? I plan to sand it again, wet I think, and in doing so, should I expect alot of the primer to come off?
Did I prepare the surface well enough?
I ultimately plan to add some more primer, sand it, and then add the "High heat Black" paint as you see from the can in the pic.



so any help from experienced painters would be helpful.
BTW - the CF undertail piece is a work in progress also don't mind it's ragged state - I actually have CF under control - thanks, jones


 

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you need a few more coats of primer...especially on the edges! if i were you i'd go with powdercoat...rocks will chip the paint off the swingarm pretty quick! if you want it to last powdercoat is the way to go!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
you need a few more coats of primer...especially on the edges! if i were you i'd go with powdercoat...rocks will chip the paint off the swingarm pretty quick! if you want it to last powdercoat is the way to go!

Yeah I know powdercoat is really the way to go... I'm just trying to do as much as I can myself...I was hoping that with a few good layers of paint and a solid clearcoat that it'll be durable.....so is what I'm encountering normal when primering aluminum?

thanks for any further helpful input
 

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well...id go get some aluminum ANODISING paint...it'd hold up better!
 

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where the primer sands off the metal quicker just means it's a high spot. I don't know about the brush on paint though. I would get spray cans if I were you and make sure you check to make sure the clearcoat will not react with that type paint. Try it on a seperate test piece of metal. Make sure your hands are clean when you work on it, I wear latex gloves when I do any finishwork just to avoid any adhesion problems. If you take your time it will look nice, but you will be redoing it often.
 

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Did you clean the surface really well before priming? That could explain why it didn't adhere in some spots - could be some oily residue or something that was on the surface.

BTW, I've seen pics of those swingarms powdercoated and they look sweet ass - I'd 2nd you powdercoating it instead
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yea i would definately use something that sprays verses a brush, try a can or airbrush.
I DO have an airgun and I'm NOT using any brushes whatsoever........
re: the fact that the primer is not sticking to the edges is odd to me b/c I did prepare the surface very well I did wear gloves and I sanded it as stated above ....thanks for the help fellas I'm going to keep trying for now. - jones
 

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edges always sand quicker, the film build is never as high on corners/edges, thats just how the paint flows. That is why when colorsanding/buffing clear you try to stay away from edges or do them very carefully by hand.

Just make sure that primer is not laquer based or your going to have problems using an AE.

When painting you really don't want to start off with a heavier grit then need be, but rather stick to the same grit and get enough scratch to form that mechanical bond with the paint.

Unless you are doing some sort of filler work then you don't need to sand the primer, just stay within the topcoat window and you can apply your basecoat or whatever wet (assuming you have no problems with the primer)

Your best bet is to scuff everything up really well with a red scotchbrite pad, clean, tack and then spray your BBQ paint.
Good luck.
Later/joe
 

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Yea if i was painting anything of value i wouldent use bbq paint. Go to autozone or advance and get duplicolor. Get the primer, paint, and clear coat. avoid sanding any edges the paint is extreamly thin there. also try using higher # sandpaper. If you can afford it powder coat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Here's what I did - pics to follow.
I went to my local auto parts/auto paint dealer and he highly recommended me to use PPG Non-sanding Epoxy Paint Primer. I paid 70.00 for both the epoxy and the hardener for my air gun.

I sanded off the black shitty primer (above in pics) really well and hit it with the Exoxy Primer and this stuff STICKS! I'm pretty psyched so far...he recommended that I do about 3 coats and not to clear coat it. Pics to come - thanks for your help fellas....jones
 

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Now you're getting up towards that powdercoat range. There's a company here in Houston that said they would powder coat my swing arm for around $150. You're half way there with just the primer.

Good luck though, it's always fun to do the work yourself.
 

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for 70 bucks you should have powdercoated it lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
for 70 bucks you should have powdercoated it lol.
Yeah I know I know.... but since I'm also going to do my frame with the epoxy and maybe I can use it for other parts and things round the house (maybe I'll paint my cat) I justified it - you know how it goes when you DIY
 
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