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hey yall. i did my first track run monday at cresson, it was awesome, and i'm totally addicted. i'm a newb rider on a K6 gsxr 1k, but did very well on throttle control.
my gixxer 1k has full leo vince, pcIII, bmc race filter, velocity stacks, gilles rear sets, vortex front rear 520, puig db, and only 2k miles. i'm wanting to get penske rear shock, traxxion on the forks, ohlins steering damper. so basically, that bike is kinda my baby.
i'm not an idiot to think i won't crash on a track, so here's my question.. should i get left/right covers, race plastic, etc.. or just bite the bullet and keep that bike as my baby and buy a used 600 for track days? do yall have a designated "track bike" and then a dope ass street bike? thanks for any advice!!
 

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If you have the funds...a dedicated track bike is the only way to go.
 

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I agree wit those 2 ....Also, if you get a 600 there's no need to dump a ton O $$$ in to it, ride to the limits, then upgrade..i.e. them fancy smancy fork thingys..ect..:D IMHO, better to get the bike Dialed in..i.e. suspension, tires, brakes and such..


Oh, and welcome to da addiction...:cheers
 

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Buy a race prepped 600. There are 3.2 million of them for sale and you can get one nicely set up for very little cash compared to the cost of building one. Plus a 600 is WAY easier to go fast on than a 1k.
 

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Yep a dedicated track bike is the way to go. I lost my 2001 1k with a track crash and when I was bike less for a month I made sure not to do that gain. I was off the track for the rest of the year after my school at MidOH and got a 600. It only took me one day on the 600 to get my laptimes down to where I was on the 1k when I crashed. So the 600 will teach to you be faster then a 1k will. There are some who learn to go fast on the 1k but not likely and generally takes them more track time. Just watch the Novice 1000 class you will see that most of the top riders in the class are not on 1000s.
 

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chrisOH said:
Yep a dedicated track bike is the way to go. I lost my 2001 1k with a track crash and when I was bike less for a month I made sure not to do that gain. I was off the track for the rest of the year after my school at MidOH and got a 600. It only took me one day on the 600 to get my laptimes down to where I was on the 1k when I crashed. So the 600 will teach to you be faster then a 1k will. There are some who learn to go fast on the 1k but not likely and generally takes them more track time. Just watch the Novice 1000 class you will see that most of the top riders in the class are not on 1000s.
What everybody else said... but there is something to be said for the acceleration of a 1k that makes a 600 seem a bit pokey on the long stretches. You are gonna wanna grab yourself a dedicated track bitch -- I mean bike.

.
 

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Spooner said:
Buy a race prepped 600. There are 3.2 million of them for sale and you can get one nicely set up for very little cash compared to the cost of building one. Plus a 600 is WAY easier to go fast on than a 1k.
+1

buy a bike some else spent all their money on.
learn corner speed, and work on being smooth. :cheers
 

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Yeah with my Insurance settlement I am going to be getting two 1ks an 06 for the street and get a 07 to race in Novice Superbike and superstock in WERA next year.

I am not looking forward to the 1000 at Nelson Ledges in OH. That back kink will be scary as Fack.

Hell I had a small slide on my 600 near the top of 4th gear coming onto the backstraight at Nelson near 100 or just over not sure.
 

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my two cents being where you are only a couple of months ago. I have a thousand, but also went and bought a dedicated track bike in July (an 05 R6) I have learned much more on my R6 in 4 trackdays than I ever learned the first 2 years I've been riding. Now that I have a 600 and have really seen what it's capable of I question why I have a 1000 and am looking to sell it. You could very easily find that you are no where near ready for that beast on a track once you get a little more experience and start to push your limits.
 

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any 600 can go almost comprable lap times in the hands of a novice to expert rider. In pro classes the gap would be bigger.
A 600 is not necassarily easier to go FAST with, its easy to go with.
Actually going as fast as a 1000 on a track with a 600 bike is more dangerous than doing it with a 1000, due to increased corner entry and mid corner speeds. Some people think its harder to highside or low side a 600 since it doenst have the power and the torque to do it, but basically if you want to go fast on a 600, you have to be on the power band at all times, this requires a lot of shifting, precise throttle control and keeping the rpm's above 10,000 . With a 1000 you can be lazy enter a corner 4th gear 5000 rpms and the bike would still pull through the corner and youll be ok. With a 600 if you enter a corner 4the gear 5000 rpm, your bike would run wide, it would be pretty hard to tighten your line and create a potentially dangerous situation for you. If you enter the corner right like downshifted twice, bike in the power band, screaming, forks compressed, trail braking in to the corner, again you have to be very smooth and precise with the throttle since 120 hp at the right spot is more than enough to make you go bye bye.

Basically what I am trying to say is, unless you have a hammer style hand when it comes to throttle, 1000 can be safer than a 600. A 600 would teach you to go fast much more than a 1000, a 600 would change your lazy riding style ( well at least mine is pretty lazy, I take it easy on corner entry's, get on the gas mid corner and get a good drive and slam shut on straights, seems to work pretty well) in to actual every miliscond counts riding style. Lazy riding can carry you only so much, so I am plannig on getting a 600 soon too.
 

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Gonna hafta disagree with you there on a few points. Transitioning to a 600 does several things:

  • Decreases the sprung weight that the rider has the coax in and out of corners.
  • Decreases the likelihood of spinning up the tires on corner exits due to over zealous throttle inputs.
  • Much more forgiving on midcorner corrections.
  • More compliant under heavy breaking.
Don't get me wrong the big gixx is a well engineered bike and can be used by a first time racer who has experience on the bike. But speaking from personal experience I've found that throttle control is probably the most important thing out there and its nice to know that the margin of error increases a bit with the smaller displacement gixx. Meaning that if I do get ham fisted I'm less likely to do an impression of one of the bad guys on the "A-Team" getting blown up in the air from a grenade.

In short the 600 is plenty capable, but more managable.

.
 

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I disagree on the weight issue due to the fact that the difference between the 1000 and 600s is only about 15lbs and was only 10lbs difference in the 01-03 models.

Now it does take more effort to get as fast on a 600 as one is on a 1k. The 600 lets work on corner entry more as you are generally 20mph slower at your brake marker for the 1k then you are with the 600. This will generally increase your entry speed as most riders will tend to slow down more as their end trap speed increases.

The key to going FAST on the 1ks is being able to have real close corner entry speed to a 600 since 10-20lbs of weight isn't going to make that much difference except to pros, having the same mid corner speed, having the throttle control to roll on the gas and get the maximum drive without spin or a little spin.

I have lost the rear 2-3 times on my 600 on the track with race tires due to a hair to much throttle at lean. I have also been able to spin the rear on exit once the tires started to drop off on my 600 (not slide, spin).
 

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chrisOH said:
I disagree on the weight issue due to the fact that the difference between the 1000 and 600s is only about 15lbs and was only 10lbs difference in the 01-03 models.

Now it does take more effort to get as fast on a 600 as one is on a 1k. The 600 lets work on corner entry more as you are generally 20mph slower at your brake marker for the 1k then you are with the 600. This will generally increase your entry speed as most riders will tend to slow down more as their end trap speed increases.

The key to going FAST on the 1ks is being able to have real close corner entry speed to a 600 since 10-20lbs of weight isn't going to make that much difference except to pros, having the same mid corner speed, having the throttle control to roll on the gas and get the maximum drive without spin or a little spin.

I have lost the rear 2-3 times on my 600 on the track with race tires due to a hair to much throttle at lean. I have also been able to spin the rear on exit once the tires started to drop off on my 600 (not slide, spin).
Good points.

I'm not gonna fight too hard on the weight issue, because the physical geometry of the 600 plays a part in its easier turning as well. In either case I feel that a 600 (or something smaller for that fact) affords a new racer to feel more of what the bike is doing and isn't so harsh when it metes out punishment for mistakes.

I haven't spun my rear (atleast that I've noticed) much on the 600. But on my 1k having the ass end spin was a way of life.

.
 

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Yeah you are correct on that. The another reason why the 1000 may not turn quite as easy as the 600 is the Pistons and engine internals are a bit heavier so small mounts of weight create more inertia. But these are things that mostly very experienced track riders can feel. Even at my level then I couldn't tell except for the ability to get on the gas harder and sooner due to confidence the rear would hook up.

But I am talking from experience since I went from 2001 GSXR 1000 (same track) to the next time on the track 2003 GSXR 600. Turn in was really not that noticeable in difference. Same tires (literally) both all stock except the 1000 had 750 rims and a half slip on exhaust.
 

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The only time I had my 1k slide was stupid mistakes (this on street tires) and very cold tires.

Last time on street tires (tires were on 2nd trackday with street miles mixed in) the rear was spinning damn near everywhere and it was Fun.

I went to race tires and next time out ended up touching peg down a few times and one in a corner that is 100+. But last session of the day I made a stupid mistake and lost it and lost the bike. Mistake was not power related at all.
 

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The inertia of the heavier internals make the biggest difference during cornering. The weight of the bike itself is not that important.

My point was that if you are riding a 600 competitivly to make up for non comptitive 1000 times, you are putting yourself more at risk.
If you are just riding then ofcourse 600 is much safer.
 

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Jeenis said:
hey yall. i did my first track run monday at cresson, it was awesome, and i'm totally addicted. i'm a newb rider on a K6 gsxr 1k, but did very well on throttle controlquote]


with the highlighted above... take back the bike, take all the pretty stuff off, spend more time in lvl 1 on a more used bike first. b/c all that stuff you've bought for that bike so far is doing ONE thing. just burning a hole in your pocket.
 
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