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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
My bike currently has stock suspension up front and a FOX racing shock out back.
I want to get a pair of 750 inverted forks for the front and rebuild them w/ new hardware.
I weight in at 170 w/o gear & about 5.9.
I don't go to the tracks but i do hit up the canyons a lot.

What do you guys recommend for me to upgrade in the forks?
What type of spring do i use?
Oil weight?

Any comments or opinions will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
 

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You can rebuild tose stock forks no need to spend more money to convert the front. The showa 750's will help but your stocks are fine if you throw some valves in them and correct spring. With the valves the front end wont be so rough over pot holes etc. I have traxxion forks on my 750 and I cant feel the front end. As opposed before I could feel the front end load and unload.

If you buy a set of Race tech valves 130 bucks, springs 100 bucks oil, and seals 30 bucks

I would use the weight oil the valve manufactors recommend and youll also want to know the oil height. Race Tech recommends 5wt, GMD 5wt, traxxion 7wt, stock 10wt. They all differ depending on maker
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What's the difference in handling between the inverted and conventional forks?
I've heard a lot of good things about inverted forks.
What are the pros and cons on the inverted and conventional forks?

Thanks
 

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Supposedly inverts flex much less than conventionals, all other things being equal. But is that a difference that will impact you? nope. Is less flex necessarily a good thing. nope.

Look at it this way... you can find good riders on middleweight bikes with conventional forks routinely tromping the competition in heavyweight & even unlimited classes in all levels of racing. Do you think they're being held back by the flex in their forks?

Conventional forks are easier to service, require fewer tools, and can do their job just as well as inverts. IMO - you'll be doing yourself a favor by saving the money you'd spend retrofitting your entire front end, and spending it on valving & springs like Ibidu recommended.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Why are most, if not all late model sportbikes coming out with inverted forks?
Is it just because it gives the bike a better look?
 

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I'm not 100% on the reasoning behind it, Super. I know that flex has alot to do with it. Unsprung weight has alot to do with it too. But I know there are surely other factors that have nothing to do with performance... marketability, re-usability of parts across different models, etc.

It's a 'law of diminishing returns' type of affair... where is your money better spent? Replacing your whole front end to take advantage of something you're not even going to notice at your level of riding, or reworking what you have to give you top-notch suspension? The latter is definitely the way to go.

Of course, if money isn't an issue, then you could do both... replace the front end with inverts, have them sprung & valved correctly, maybe even go with complete cartridge kits or high-dollar aftermarket forks.

But if it's an either/or type of deal, you will DEFINITELY get more bang for your buck buliding up the forks you have rather than switching over to inverts. And as I wrote above, it's a two-way street... conventionals do have certain advantages over inverts, depending on the way you look at things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks LeanAngle. I just have one more question. Sorry to bug.
You said that unsprung weight has a lot to do with it as well.

How much lighter are the 98 750 inverted forks over the conventional ones?

I'm trying to cut as much fat off my bike as possible. I have a guy that is selling
me a an inverted front end for a hell of a price.
 

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Honestly, man... I couldn't tell you the difference. But I can pretty confidently say that I seriously doubt you'll notice any difference whatsoever. And your while your unsprung weight may go down, your total weight should (I think) go up by switching to inverts (don't quote me on this).

Maybe you can sell the front end your bike has now and use the proceeds to cover the new front end? If so - then you're even-steven. Then I'd probably say go for it. But no matter which front end you wind up with, I'd still do the suspension work suggested whenever you get a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cool. Thanks a lot man. I'm definately going to revalve and respring either
setup.
 

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after reading these posts, in an honest opinion about the inverted forks, would you say if you are still learning these can be a hamper on fundamentals? the reason i ask is because the bike i am looking at already has the conversion, but the bike i have been learning on so far has conventionals... would this be a hinderance (sp)?
 

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Had a 97 600 gix with a fox twin clicker, and resprung and revalved stock forks...IF it's done right, those cartridge forks work just fine...
My advice is, have a PRO do the work, it's worth the $$$...


By the way, I weigh about the same as you, but a TAD Taller..
I had .90 springs up front, and a 425 spring on the shock...
 
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