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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
Alright, here's the deal -- I have a ton of updates to post, but no more image space left on my profile. Does a membership unlock more space? Anyway, the last pictures I was able upload are of the construction on my custom underbelly exhaust.

I plan on extending the lower fairings out, and I played around with a bunch of different exhaust designs before settling on a slash cut. I first made a mock-up out of cardboard, then tweaked the design in Autocad before finally taking the plunge into stainless. I cut all the bends on our bandsaw and machined an inlet piece for attaching to the stock header.




A friend of mine builds nostalgia funny cars for a living, so he has all the metal fab tools (shears, brakes, rollers) at his place, not to mention his son is a rather good TIG welder. So, I loaded up my supplies and headed over there for a long day (or two) of fab work. I used .049" stainless sheet for the body, stainless perforated sheet for the core (which we rolled into a 2.5" tube), and a 2.5" mandrel bend on the outlet.




The core was wrapped with long-strand stainless wool and was welded into place. Then, we popped the top on while simultaneously stuffing the box with Bristol Core muffler packing -- this step was not easy at all, but somehow we got everything in there.




We cut the stainless pieces so exact that we were able to fusion weld (no filler) almost every seam on the box itself. I also added an O2 bung on the pipe. The completed unit weighs less than 6 lbs and should outlast the bike.



Once I figure out how to upload more pics, I'll have lots more to share. Things get very interesting...
 

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I have some pics of his kit on my bike. 2005 GSXR1000, i only bought mount and pulley as i had my own Frankenstein system already but his is a work of art.. it is perfect. the machining is amazing. I dont want to post them until he gets his own up. But i can say the quality and the help i have gotten from him is the best i have ever had. His service is top notch. and the work is astounding. I have a Brother in-law who does R & D machining in the Aerospace industry and his jaw dropped when i showed him my parts. he said it was amazing.
 

· You should listen to me. No, seriously, listen to
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I was cringing early on when you cut the boss off the block but you clearly are no cobbler. The throttle body adapter is beautiful. Does it attach to the throttle body with clamps like the OEM style? I originally thought that the inlet was aluminum but I now see that it's aluminum filled nylon. I hope that you don't have any header heat issues with it. It's fascinating what complex shapes can be made by laser sintering. The undercuts in the PAIR plates will tend to be a place for crud to accumulate. I'm suprised that you didn't put them on the underside. However IMO that's a perfect place for carbon/epoxy, which is lighter and won't need the undercuts. But I think that you may need special tools to do them by CNC because it's so abrasive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
I was cringing early on when you cut the boss off the block but you clearly are no cobbler. The throttle body adapter is beautiful. Does it attach to the throttle body with clamps like the OEM style? I originally thought that the inlet was aluminum but I now see that it's aluminum filled nylon. I hope that you don't have any header heat issues with it. It's fascinating what complex shapes can be made by laser sintering. The undercuts in the PAIR plates will tend to be a place for crud to accumulate. I'm suprised that you didn't put them on the underside. However IMO that's a perfect place for carbon/epoxy, which is lighter and won't need the undercuts. But I think that you may need special tools to do them by CNC because it's so abrasive.

The adapter is held on with silicone connectors and low-profile hose clamps. Obviously a direct bolting method & o-rings would be preferred, but I've had no issues with any boost leakage using this method in the past.

I baked the inlet in the oven for an hour at 300 degrees with no ill effects at all (it wasn't even soft). Once I can post up some more pictures, you'll see how I'm dealing with the heat from the header.

Also, the contour on the PAIR plates is mainly for appearance. Once anodized they are super easy to clean, and it's not like you see them anyway without lifting the tank. Also, I'm so done with carbon -- way too many bad experiences with vendors to go back down that route (especially for no real gain).
 

· You should listen to me. No, seriously, listen to
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^I can understand if your experiences involve vendors making molds etc. But flat stock is available from vendors like DragonPlate. I made mine from their 3/16" sheet. I'd think that it would be a piece of cake with CNC. But suit yourself.
 

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Wow the kit is looking unreal!

I'm the guy from up in Canada that talked to you about the kits for the zx10, and when you told me about how much better the gsxr kit would be, I immediately went out and bought an 08 gsxr1000 exactly like yours! The bike has 3000kms on it and I can't wait till you're done the kit.

I forgot to ask you on the phone, if you are taking deposits? When and where?

I would even be willing to come down there and personally give you the money and shake your hand for doing one of the finest SC kit builds I've ever seen.

-James
 

· That’s Mister Chalet to you ....
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I've been subscribed and following this project with great interest. It seems redundant even saying it but... outstanding work! :thumbup



Sorry if this is a stupid question but I see you've installed a point on the exhaust for what looks to be a butterfly.... are you putting the SET valve back in??????
 

· Chubby Chaser
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Here's a little guide on CNC machining parts. Most people probably think that all it takes to machine a billet part is a drawing and the push of a button. Ha, I wish. Unless you have access to some expensive CAM software and a 5-axis machine, it's nowhere near that easy.

First you create a drawing. In my case, a 2D drawing of the front and back of the part is required. Then, using those drawings, you create a program that the CNC mill runs on. With the software we have, this means manually creating toolpaths, figuring out cutting depths, and generating code for each individual tool to be used. For this supercharger bracket, a total of 4 programs (front, back, fixture, facing) will have to be created to get to the finished part.

We're not done yet. After ordering material, the blanks have to be cut to the proper length. Then, each blank is squared up and faced (front and back) to the final thickness. The first op is the front side...





Before the back can be machined, the fixture has to be created. This fixture locates the blanks via 3 pinned locations and will allow the final part to be cut out of the larger material.




The fixture is clamped in the vises and the blank is bolted to it. After loading up a different set of tools, the backside program is run...




The part is then unbolted from the fixture, cleaned off, deburred, and voilà:





The only thing to check now is fitment on the bike. Think it fits?






Woohoo! All is good. The only thing left to do now is send out the bracket and idler pulley for anodize.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=uFcQPXlDAdw#t=3297s
 
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