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hey guys, thinking of doing one of the above. which would be a better one? i know one is ground fighting while the other is similar to kickboxing.

j
 

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:dunno your comparing two very different fighting styles. Both are really cool though.
 

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Hard to tell...can the striker stop a takedown? Can the jiu jitsu fighter protect themself while standing up? There are a lot of factors.
 

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thanks guys. found a good muay thai class for 75 bucks a month going 3 times a week.

j
 

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I take a style called Ketsugo which has five different arts involved. Savate (French Kickboxing), Judo, Karate, Yawara, and Aikido. I would start with the Muay Thai so that way you can learn your 8 limbs and the strikes that they use. Then you can take the strikes you learned in Kickboxing and use those when you learn Jiu Jitsu and take someone to the ground. You will find that with time all of the arts will come together and a light will turn on in your head.
 

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I took Muay Thai some 8 years ago and i wrestled back in high school (not quite bjj but similar in being a ground game of sorts) The Thai style is a strong stand up game with strong striking techniques of the eight limbs (hands, feet, elbow, knees.) The bjj is extremely strong since most actual fights tend to fall on the ground so most bjj fighters are VERY comfortable lying on their backs knowing that they can still win the fight with their strategic locks and holds.

Can a striker stop a take down? sure if he is trained to know how to react when a grappler goes in for the shoot. Much like in wrestling if one wrestler goes in for the shoot, the wrestler who is in the receiving end has two angles to work with anything under 90 degrees and anything over 90 degrees. (90 degrees = having body in an upright position.) The shooter usually aims for the front leg of the opponent lets say for example the right leg happens to be in front. the fighter will shoot for the right leg for the take down. The receiving end fighter can either step back with his left leg and at the same time the right leg in which the grappler has shot for has to extend outwards away from the left leg to create a balance and thus causing his weight to shift forward (under 90 degrees) to cause the shooter to lay on their stomach while the opponent is laying his chest to the shooters back. Should the shooter be quick and shoots for your right leg for the take down it means you've gone over the 90 degree mark in which you are more likely to land on your back with whatever take down (single/double leg,)he chooses.

for the question can a bjj fighter protect themselves in a stand up game, sure. all styles of martial arts will usually have some defense in certain areas, but are more focused on the offense pending on the style being used. I remember watching a fight with Royce Gracie back in the early UFC fights and he was able to protect himself even in a stand up fight, but at the same time, his strong point was to take the fighter down. In order to do that it meant having to risk getting close enough to get hit in the face in order to plan his offensive attack which was to take the fight to the ground in which case then it was in his favor cause he was most comfortable on the ground and even on his back.

Either way you look at it there really is no wrong in either of the styles. If you prefer to fight standing up , Muay Thai. But if you are more for being able to hold your own on the ground then BJJ. You can't lose either way.
 

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You shouldn't really compare one discipline to another in terms of "which is better." Instead you should look at the skills you have and determine which areas you need to strengthen. Long range striking; close striking; ground; speed...:cheers

Think of it like chess. Each skill area represents a different piece in chess. Try winning a chess match with just two knights. Improving all aspects will grow you as a warrior.
 

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fuk 75 a month a cheap our trainer is 50 a hr and only once a week but 3 weeks a month of course but he's also a big part of muay thai usa
 

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seeing as the muay thai fighters in ufc are dominating at this point, i would go with it. its good to get frustrations out. if your looking just for self defense i would look into kajukembo or krav maga
 

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Engulf yourself in one and then the other. Atleast 1 year in each. You will respect eveything that it teaches and will be better off than trying to learn both at the same time. Like everyone said, each is different and each style is used for its intended purpose. I personally went ground game for 1 1/2 years then switched to muay thai.
I prefer ground game because sparring does not get you hurt as much and it has a lot to do with strategy. HAve fun
 

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Muay Thai wins hands down for striking (IMO). I have 10 years of training under my belt and as stated offers the best striking ability of all martial arts focusing on range strikes (kicks, punches) and in close blows (elbows, knees and headbutts).

Unfortunately defensive maneuvers pretty much boil down to you dodging the strike or using your own body to block the incoming attack. There is no ground work as it relies purely on stand up and taking your opponent out quickly.

Try to avoid the Western based Muay Thai clubs. Look for clubs run by Thai natives... the western style Muay Thai is sloppy and they don't adhere to old traditions of training or pre-fight set up. That's been my experience here in MN...
 

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Try to avoid the Western based Muay Thai clubs. Look for clubs run by Thai natives... the western style Muay Thai is sloppy and they don't adhere to old traditions of training or pre-fight set up. That's been my experience here in MN...
what is considered western based Muay Thai? I thought kickboxing was the Western's version of muay thai sans the elbows or knees in the actual fighting.
 

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I've trained in both. I personally love BJJ. I could sit in a tournament and watch it for hours. Muay Thai is very impressive but not as intersting to me as BJJ. If you are looking for cardio to get in shape and to possibly show off your skills in a bar fight go for Muay Thai. Im not saying that with any disrespect to kickboxers whatsoever. Kickboxing takes much greater cardio and good luck going to the ground and putting someone in your full gaurd in a bar fight. Why not go to a school where you can do both. Thats what most people do who get into MMA. You can train one day in one and the next in the other and be a little more well rounded. They are both incredible sports. Good luck. Just dont be a weenie and give up your back or throw up during the rounds on the bags.
 

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what is considered western based Muay Thai? I thought kickboxing was the Western's version of muay thai sans the elbows or knees in the actual fighting.
I've been to clubs around MN that call themselves Muay Thai, but do not adhere to traditions and have a distinctive fight style. The best example I can think of during my first few weeks is how they taught kicking and punching ... very snappy and flashy with no focus on power, speed, and foot work.

No pre-fight dance, very "American" and it drove me up the damn wall. It honestly reminded me of the Cobras from the Karate Kid movie.
 

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I've been to clubs around MN that call themselves Muay Thai, but do not adhere to traditions and have a distinctive fight style. The best example I can think of during my first few weeks is how they taught kicking and punching ... very snappy and flashy with no focus on power, speed, and foot work.

No pre-fight dance, very "American" and it drove me up the damn wall. It honestly reminded me of the Cobras from the Karate Kid movie.
i think if i went to a school like that i would probably be a really bad fighter coming out then before going in. Sounds like a McDojo i assume.
 
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