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anyone used one of these on a gixxer 1000?...any opinions and dos and donts....how about price range...any comments are welcome..thanks
 

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cycle world blew a 1000 up on velocity system turbo whats up with that?

greg
 

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I have a velocity system. They are non inter-cooled which means lighter weight, capable of being strapped for the strip and you don't need to worry about breaking an intercooler landing wheelies.

On the bad side, you can't run too much pressure or things get too hot and motors break. Cycle World had their Velocity 1k for 4 months of thrashing before they turned the pressure up from 6psi to 10 psi for their top speed test. It broke the motor. If it was just for a short hit, it would probably have survived. That was to be expected from what I've heard since Barry supposedly told Cycle World to do their worst.

Leave it at 6 psi and you're fine.

Add lower compression turbo pistons and you can probably run 10 psi fine.

It's all about what you want. If you want as much power as possible with extra costs, weight and an lack of front wheel clearance, get the Express. Otherwise, Velocity's the way to go.

Maybe Seb or Barry could comment on this?

-Wicked
 

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Cycle World was not trying to break 200 when they bumped up the boost they were trying to break 210. As stated before if you want to run higher boost on the 1000 it would be suggested to run turbo pistons and or put a spacer plate in to lower the compression. I would highly suggest Velocity Racing. The components in their base system is much better compared to competitors race systems which the McXpress is not. Also very soon for all of those that insist on having intercoolers, Velocity will offer intercoolers. I prefer water injection myself unless you are going for insane #'s. I know that Lofty's Busa has over 400hp with water injection. Another thing is that some people have cooling issues with intercoolers in traffic because it blocks the air flow of the radiator.

www.VelocityRacing.com

[ 12-20-2002, 10:44 PM: Message edited by: Spinn ]
 

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ok guys u got me pretty convinced.for those of u who have a velocity how is it runnin through city in traffic and what kinda hp is it makin at 6psi?

greg
 

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Once was because they turned the boost up too high and the other was a Suzuki part failure, non turbo related.
 

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At 6psi...

Notice the smoothness?
Bike's making about 175 hp starting at 7k. Turn it up to 8 psi and you're looking at 228 hp and just as smooth.

What this all includes:


What it will look like on your bike (if it's a blue/white of course)


-Wicked
 

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Yes it is. For setting top speed records (long time at WFO) get something intercooled. Otherwise, a non-intercooled kit like Velocity's the better bet for regular use/daily driving. One additional thing that you will need to get is a PCIIIr.

My bike is also set up with an boost controller. For regular use it's set up for 6psi, and if I were to hit the horn in 5th or 6th, the boost jumps up to about 10. Not something that's going to be used for longer than a few seconds since the motor is bone stock.

-Wicked
 

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Originally posted by WickedSpeed:
For setting top speed records (long time at WFO) get something intercooled. Otherwise, a non-intercooled kit like Velocity's the better bet for regular use/daily driving. One additional thing that you will need to get is a PCIIIr.

-Wicked
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Or don't bump the boost above 6lbs for top end runs on a stock motor. At 6lbs it will run forever at "WFO". If you want more boost just make a couple of motor mods. I would start by lowering the compression via spacer plate. If you wanted even more yet then I would consider turbo pistons, conecting rods, and water injection. Each one of those will increase the capability of the motor for running more lbs. of boost. I would do all of those mods before I used an intercooler.
 

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Barry is the owner and the one I have always delt with. He has been pretty busy lately. He got a full factory ride for Sportbike Shootout class in AMA Prostar.
 

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Mc express in sweden blow their head gasket on a turbo "standard busa" but it was because they where trying to breake the world record. And they did!!!!!!!!
Stronger clutch
Special cams
Stronger cylinder head bolts

First run on 2,5 bar it made 626 RWHP at 10500 rpm
It made 640 RWHP at 2,8 bar but it was then they blow the head gasket.


http://www.snowrider.se/video.asp?Filename=http://www.otlas.se/video/SR_Turbobusa.wmv
 

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I have an MC Xpress system that is vastly different than a velocity or hahn kit. It makes almost peak hp at 6k rpm, almost instantaneously. I wanted to be able to use the power, not have to rap it out to 11k rpm to get it to spool up. The velocity and hahn kits are like the stock power curve but with extra juice most everywhere. I commute daily on my turbo bike and love it. It is very predictable, but it is true that it puts down ridiculously mad amounts of power.

Since I wished there was one before I purchased, here is a run down on the need to know stuff:

“Stage 1 kits”

these kits are made to bolt onto an unmodified stock motor. They typically include everything needed including an exhaust, header, airbox, oil fitting lines, boost gauge, an outboard high pressure fuel pump and regulator. These kits usually operate from 6psi to 10psi and are often manually adjustable by moving parts that are not accessible while riding the bike. Some kits are offered with a pressure switch that enables you to configure a low boost setting for controlled street riding or corners, and a high boost switch for all out power.

“Stage 2 kits”
usually are capable of running higher boost numbers because they have extra fuel injectors in the airbox to compensate for when the stock injectors get to max flow. They may include intercooling or watercooling. They may also include a thicker head gasket, a better boost controller, wastegate, blow off valve, and other items.

A word about pressure:
Stock GSXR 1000 motors seem to be stable at up to 10psi of boost or so, with some form of cooling i.e. water injection or intercooling, and with a thicker head gasket. 10 psi of boost can generate up to the neighborhood of 250hp, and on a stock swingarm bike (like mine) it is completely absurd. There is only so much power that a bike can have before physics take over. Don’t get me wrong, I love it, but without some serious chassis and suspension dialing I doubt I could use much more peak hp. To go over 10psi and make big hp numbers with the gsxr1000 motor, you don’t have to do a thing to the head. You can even use the stock cams. All you need to do is purchase aftermarket rods like those offered by Carillo, and low compression pistons from MTC, J&E or Wiseco. Then you can run upwards of 15+psi and probably over 300hp at the tire.

Here is a breakdown about what is available [in the US]
Hahn:
Stage one kit is basic, with little or no options, at around $3600 it is the cheapest system and has huge bang for the buck. It operates in the 6-8psi range and will make in the ballpark of 210hp-230hp give or take when bolted on a bone stock motor. They require the use of a power commander. Their kits have the greatest availablility and shortest order times (2 to 3 weeks for real, not just hyped to be so). They can be purchased directly from the company or by some online retailers like indysuperbikes.com. Power curve is similar to stock but augmented, so that it comes on gradually—not as smooth as velocity’s kits and nowhere as abrupt as MC Xpress’s vertical power curves…

Velocity Racing:
Stage 1:
Extremely high quality, durable kit that mounts up with great parts and excellent customer support. It is a no frills system that will run to 10 psi all day. At $4300 retail, these systems are becoming more and more popular mostly because of the quality of the components, not to say that their competitor’s stuff is breaking all over the place, but that Velocity’s stuff is very finely crafted, polished and functional. Both Velocity’s kits require the use of a power commander

Stage 2:
Add another $1500 to the stage one and you get a bunch of goodies that can pave the road to expansion. It should be noted that for the extra money, out of the box, this kit doesn’t make any more hp than the stage 1, but it is much more upgradeable to be used on a motor with internal engine work that can do 300hp. For someone who wants the best street kit and isn’t going to tear their motor apart, they don’t really need this system at all: a stage one is fine. For the person who is willing to tear their motor apart and go big, this kit is a great place to start. It comes with a thicker head gasket, a Tial wastegate, extra injectors and more.

MC Xpress
Their kit is more of a stage 2 because it comes with a complete intercooler, extra fuel injectors in the airbox with a piggy back electronic fuel controller, a thicker head gasket, and lots of other goodies. For the mid $5k range, this kit is for the serious turbo junky. This kit has a huge power hit in the midrange, and I mean huge. It goes from 100hp or so at 5k rpm to well over 200hp at 6k or thereabouts. So for the guy who is street riding, this kit makes such huge midrange that you don’t have to turn high rpm for the turbo to spool up. MC Xpress is located in Sweden, but Next Level Racing sells and installs them in the USA. They do not require the use of a power commander.

Mr.Turbo
An innovator in the turbo bike world, they started doing turbos some time ago. However, they have fallen behind the times and don’t really keep up with what’s new. Their kits are more like stage 2 or race kits, but for a gsxr 1000 I really wouldn’t consider one.

A word about Installation:
These kits are not easy to install. An average mechanic can usually do them in a couple of full days, but adaptation may be required depending upon the kit. Manufacturers spec anywhere from 10 to 20 hours for install, depending upon various variables. Most shops who do turbo installs charge a grand or more to do it.

Water injection or Intercooling?
The most important fact for durability of a turbo bike motor is, after oil of course, the usage of either water injection or intercooling. The turbo heats the air as it is pressurized, and for optimum performance and durability, anyone with a turbo bike running 9+psi of boost should consider either water injection, which squirts a fine mist of air into the air to cool it and prevent detonation. This type of system is very effective but has to be refilled and maintained. An intercooler is similar to what you might imagine a radiator for air to be. The turbo pushes air through a radiator that then feeds the airbox. The air flowing through the intercooler is supposed to cool the air, and never requires any maintenance. There are no stage one kits that come with either, so if you are going to make a purchase of a turbo and might run it hard you should budget for some type of cooling. Velocity charges $650 extra for their water cooling system, which is made by Aquamist (the premier water injection supply company).

Websites?
There are very few websites that have information on turbos for bikes. Next Level Racing’s site has a lot of turbo toys and other things that can help someone get information about the different options. Velocity’s website is basic, but has a listing of what comes with their kits. Hahn’s website is very basic, as is MC Xpress’s and Mr. Turbo’s.

If anyone has questions about them email me. I may have been guessing at numbers or data, so if there is an exception to something I have stated I wouldn’t be too surprised, but this information is in general according to my experience.
 

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Hi!

Talk with Erik Marklund, he is the owner of Mc-Express in Sweden.
He has got a GSXR 1000 -02 with turbo, so he can help you with all of your questions!
Erik is a very nice guy and really likes to help human being.
home page: http://www.mc-xpress.com/
Telephone Number: +46911-202005

Greetings from Sweden
 
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