Suzuki GSX-R Motorcycle Forums Gixxer.com banner

21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
Simoncelli was one of the very best. The news made my thoughts and whole body run cold....

His spirit will live on every MotoGP race and everytime I climb onto my motorcycle I will remember him....RIP Marco, see you in the next life. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
110 Posts
I can't believe he's gone...what a talent he had, and will be missed by all.

I found this quote in one of the many articles published on the web (source unknown apparently): When asked if he was afraid of dying in an accident, Simoncelli apparently responded: "No. You live more for five minutes going fast on a bike like that, than other people do in all of their life."

Well put Marco. RIP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
Well said.

http://roadracingworld.com/news/article/?article=46460

Via e-mail:

It has happened again.

A skilled, handsome, gifted racer died at the hands of the speed that thrilled him and the millions who watched. Yet we keep coming to the track. Why?

When Peter Lenz died last year at his tender age, media outlets across the country raged that one so young would be exposed to danger so great. In my opinion they did not understand.

"What did they not understand?" you ask.

Two things they did not understand. One: Each of us has our own acceptable level of risk. Whether it be trying to stop a charging running back with a pulling guard between you, or racing a motorcycle at speeds in triple digits, all of us take risks daily that we can live with.

Heck, getting out of bed in the morning is risky. Say your child or grandchild left a toy beside your bed, right where you step onto the floor. Sleepily you put your foot there and trip as you try to stand. Very likely you will hit something hard that will leave a mark.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration early estimates, over 32,000 people died in traffic incidents in the U.S. in 2010, not on a racetrack but on public roads. Already this season a handful of high school and college football players have died from participating in their sport.

Life is risky and each of us have our own acceptable level of risk.

The Second thing misunderstood by the media after Peter's death--and I'll warn you, I'm gonna get religious here--is that we are each gifted by God to do certain things with our lives. For some it is racing. Several months ago a rider who participates in the AMA Pro Daytona SportBike class asked me "How can I honor God with my life?" My answer was, "If you love racing and are good at it, you probably are doing so now by using the gifts given you."

Just like you cannot tell a giraffe not to be a giraffe, you cannot tell a racer not to be a racer. That is who you are, and it is OK.

So as we join the MotoGP community in grieving the loss of Marco Simoncelli, we can gather in support of the GP paddock, the racing officials, his competitors, all motorcycle racers, and the worldwide fans of motorcycle road racing. We can express concern for Colin Edwards and Valentino Rossi as they recover from injuries both physical and emotional.

In addition we can continue to race as safely as we can, and support safety efforts such as the Roadracing World Action Fund which helps deploy Airfence segments.

This week we go to Road Atlanta for the WERA GNF. I have a feeling that if Marco Simoncelli were to talk to us tonight, he would say "Get to the track, have fun and race hard. Celebrate my life and gifts as you express your own life and gifts."

I think Marco would agree with the plaque we keep on our kitchen table. It says "Life's Journey is not to arrive safely at the grave in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways totally worn-out shouting 'Woo Hoo! What a ride!'"

Tim Burleson
AMA Pro and WERA Chaplain
Lexington, South Carolina
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
RIP Marco. A great talent and huge loss to MotoGP:sad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
I had recorded the race, and just got a chance to watch it late last night. Such a tragic event, but completely unavoidable. As soon as the helmet was ripped off, you could tell it was not going to end well. And as the shots showed him lying there lifeless, it was definately a chilling moment. It sucks that it happened, but it's part of the risk a racer takes every time they suit up.

RIP Marco
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
Watching this accident made me feel sick to my stomach and very sad for his family and the racing community as a whole. I race superbikes at the mere amatuer level and for many reasons this loss has made me reflect for hours on end over the past few days. Motorcycle racing is a very different kind of sport...you are part of a team, but not really - only one member of it stands on the podium; only one member takes on all the risk. It's one of the few sports where death is always a very realistic possibility and where, like the Cross, love overcomes death and the fear of it. It's the love of a 2-wheeled beast that constantly urges us to throw a leg over and go faster every time out...and it's this love that justifies the risk. In motorcycle racing you're not out there trying to get hurt, but you can't consciously try not to either. Unlike so many other professional sports, steroids won't help much here - in fact they would most likely hinder. The most important muscle in motorcycle racing isn't one of physical strength, but of character - the heart. Superbike racing is a sport for men in a world so full of cowards. It's not a sport for those without fear, but for those with the strength of will to overcome and conquor it. Sometimes even parents and family members view racing as a selfish decision - as if our only goal was to provide their aging stomachs with yet another reason to be knotted up, while the hands of time force them nearer to an end we so carelessly choose to flirt with. I can't help but laugh to myself and feel like, on some level, they should be thankful we provide them with a reason to pray to a Creator they may have long since forgotten. Because they fear the possibility of their own loss, without being able to recognize our gain, they don't realize that the track isn't where we die - it is where we live. And what they don't understand, and never will, is that somehow motorcycle racing chooses us, we don't choose it. Racing is not what we do, but is who we are, and that cannot be changed. It seems to be in our blood - to flow in our veins - and whether we run amongst the ranks of top MotoGP experts or the unknown local club racers, it is still a dream fulfilled. Simoncelli's death is a terrible loss, but that isn't what we should dwell upon, even though sorrow does seem to guide us in that direction. We should reflect on his life - that he was one of the very best at what he did; that he died doing what he loved and we should all be so lucky; that he didn't let fear dominate his life like so many do and that he was operating to the very best of his God-given ability. And in the end, we can perhaps see him as an inspiration to live differently - better, stronger, purer, harder - to change. Simoncelli's death hasn't made me second guess my choice of racing, not even for a second....but it has made me want to go faster.

[R.I.P. Marco Simoncelli 1987-2011]

The Phenom
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
About this Discussion
32 Replies
33 Participants
Phenom
Suzuki GSX-R Motorcycle Forums Gixxer.com
A forum community dedicated to the Suzuki GSX-R motorcycle. Discuss the GSX-R600, GSX-R750, GSX-R1000, and GSX-R1100, and more!
Full Forum Listing
Top