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Discussion Starter #1
I dont have a tire machine and dont like driving 2 hour round trip plus paying money to do a tire swap.
I bought a nice gravity balance with cones etc.
I have tire irons and rim protectors, but breaking the bead was a challenge.

I got an old piece of oil field pipe spool fromthe junk pile and spent 30 dollars at Tractor Supply.
Some metal strips for support on the wood, bolts and nuts & some straight pipe.
I had an old bike lift stop I cut and hammered out for the tire wedge. Pulled out the chop saw and welder.

It's super primitive, but it works great.
I will add, it was harder than I thought to get everything right s far as geometry.
 

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Nice work,
I like the DIY stuff

What part of TX you in?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nice work,
I like the DIY stuff

What part of TX you in?
I think you posted here before seeing my location post in the garage thread.
But yea, if something is doable I need, I'l make it instead of buying it, plus this one is way stronger than some of the cheapies I've seen.:smile:
 

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I tried tire irons with rim protectors and bent a rim. Had to have it straightened. I said to myself, f%^k it and went and bought a machine.

Love DIY custom stuff though. Have a whole lot of DIY bearing tools.
 

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Thats a nice setup you have!

Older,long time street racer/close friend did all his own work and showed me a trick on how to use an old-school bumper jack from a car to break a bead on any bike,car tire. Have used this way exclusively since the early 90s when
I was a young buck w no money and even less patience to have a shop spend all day changing tires. I'll post a pic of how it works,even use it on my BST's:biggrin
 

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Thats a nice setup you have!

Older,long time street racer/close friend did all his own work and showed me a trick on how to use an old-school bumper jack from a car to break a bead on any bike,car tire. Have used this way exclusively since the early 90s when
I was a young buck w no money and even less patience to have a shop spend all day changing tires. I'll post a pic of how it works,even use it on my BST's:biggrin
I have lots of 'old' stuff, and still don't know where I can find one of those type jacks.
I will though, when you post how that works on the MC tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have lots of 'old' stuff, and still don't know where I can find one of those type jacks.
I will though, when you post how that works on the MC tires.
You remove tire valve core, put jack under receiver hitch etc. and the botton goes on the edge of the tire. Ive seen it done before though.

I used to have a KZ1000 with a wedge side stand, I used it to break the bead by grabbing the handlebar and pulling on the seat sideways.
When I was a kid, we changed our own tires all the time, burned them off faster than I could find them :lol
 

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I have lots of 'old' stuff, and still don't know where I can find one of those type jacks.
I will though, when you post how that works on the MC tires.
Ok,so this is my top-secret,ghetto-fabulous,hillbilly home-made bead breaker. Only a few close friends have seen this and I like to keep it that way,so don't go tellin' everyone about it :shifty

I welded a short piece of 1" pipe to a lally-column in my garage,about 24" off the floor. I put a small notch on the bottom of the pipe so the lip of the jack would sit securely and have a place to bite and not slip off.

Remember,these bumper jacks from the 1960's were super dangerous and had a tendency to fucking kill their poor owners trying to change a flat tire:biggrin

I put the curved side of the base plate along side the lip of the wheel,making sure the jack is level with the lally-column. I also put a 2'x2' 5/8" thick piece of plywood on the floor and lay the wheel on top of that,I was to lazy so its not pictured.
 

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Ok,so this is my top-secret,ghetto-fabulous,hillbilly home-made bead breaker. Only a few close friends have seen this and I like to keep it that way,so don't go tellin' everyone about it :shifty

I welded a short piece of 1" pipe to a lally-column in my garage,about 24" off the floor. I put a small notch on the bottom of the pipe so the lip of the jack would sit securely and have a place to bite and not slip off.

Remember,these bumper jacks from the 1960's were super dangerous and had a tendency to fucking kill their poor owners trying to change a flat tire:biggrin

I put the curved side of the base plate along side the lip of the wheel,making sure the jack is level with the lally-column. I also put a 2'x2' 5/8" thick piece of plywood on the floor and lay the wheel on top of that,I was to lazy so its not pictured.
That's bad ass . :cheers
 

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Thanks Coop. With all the rear tire changes I do,a used tire machine would be a wise investment. But as crude and simple as my bumper jack method is,it's effective and I can break the bead,spoon the old tire off,spoon the new one on and be done in 10mins tops.
 
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