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Dreaming of buttsecks for years...
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Once you're in the corner and settled, you can almost just let go of the bars. Going through some esses at full throttle is an entirely different story. The bike gets very heavy and needs a lot of input to turn.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Once you're in the corner and settled, you can almost just let go of the bars. Going through some esses at full throttle is an entirely different story. The bike gets very heavy and needs a lot of input to turn.
Yes, and no. Esses need input, sure, but still less input is better. Too much input might be a sign that body position needs to be better. You don't fix a setup problem with a steering damper, and you don't fix a body position problem with muscle. Also, as I got faster, I found that I was going from vertical to fully leaned over in a lot less time. There's no time to muscle it. I call it a high-speed ballet. Graceful, even beautiful. The one exception was coming off the banking at Fontana Speedway at 175 mph, it took all the muscle I had to get that sonofabitch turned in at T1. The gyro effect was huge.
 

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Dreaming of buttsecks for years...
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13,387 Posts
Like the first straight at NCM. 140mph from about 50% right lean to 100% left lean while WOT. When you feel it you'd swear your steering was locked up because you have to push so hard to make it turn.
 

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That’s Mister Chalet To You ....
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I'm surprised anyone with any degree of track experience would find that surprising.

Back in the 80s, I had a p.o.s. GPZ550 that had a speed wobble at 130-135kph. With that bike, the way to survive when it started shaking was to remove your left hand from the bars. I recall many a high speed sweeper, leaned way over, where the bike would start to go into a wobble and I'd ride-out the turn with one hand.
 

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Yes, and no. Esses need input, sure, but still less input is better. Too much input might be a sign that body position needs to be better. You don't fix a setup problem with a steering damper, and you don't fix a body position problem with muscle. Also, as I got faster, I found that I was going from vertical to fully leaned over in a lot less time. There's no time to muscle it. I call it a high-speed ballet. Graceful, even beautiful. The one exception was coming off the banking at Fontana Speedway at 175 mph, it took all the muscle I had to get that sonofabitch turned in at T1. The gyro effect was huge.
Absolutely. Well said! So you found out that as you were going faster you were getting the bike turned quicker (you had to in order to make it through the corner). So how would you describe HOW you get the bike turned quickly and effectively? Lots of riders use muscle because they don't know what the right technique is.

And then are there things you can do differently in high speed esses or places where the gyro effect is huge and you have to use more muscle/technique to get the bike turned?

:cheers
 
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