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Crescent Suzuki. The excuse made by Suzuki apparently is that the cranks have only broken on bikes that have reflashed or kit ecu's. So that gets them off the hook for all race bikes.
Suzuki is never "on the hook" for any race bike. just read the warranty.

but i will say any time i call for warranty information the first thing they ask is if it has been flashed.

jason
 

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If someone has flashed the ECU is it recognizable???

Of course I will bring it back to the original form :laugh:
 

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If someone has flashed the ECU is it recognizable???

Of course I will bring it back to the original form :laugh:
yes they can tell it was modified the "key" stays in the ecu that is why you dont have to pay for another file
when you go from stock back to your file and you can flash it how ever many times you want to.

jason
 

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Crescent Suzuki. The excuse made by Suzuki apparently is that the cranks have only broken on bikes that have reflashed or kit ecu's. So that gets them off the hook for all race bikes.
hang on, hang on. you buy and install the yoshi race kit ecu and your warranty is voided? lol
 

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hang on, hang on. you buy and install the yoshi race kit ecu and your warranty is voided? lol
Yip, all yoshi race parts are for closed course use only. i.e. not standard suzuki oem parts.

As any engine builder, or race mechanic will tell you, they is no warranties in racing.

It should be a fact that many owners are made aware of before they start flashing. that there is a risk involved that has the potential to cost you a lot if you make a mistake, suzuki will not step in and cover you.
 

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Discussion Starter #86 (Edited)
Yip, all yoshi race parts are for closed course use only. i.e. not standard suzuki oem parts.

As any engine builder, or race mechanic will tell you, they is no warranties in racing.
He issue
It should be a fact that many owners are made aware of before they start flashing. that there is a risk involved that has the potential to cost you a lot if you make a mistake, suzuki will not step in and cover you.
The main issue is not the warranty but why the cranks are breaking. It's strange that Suzuki have not asked to see the cranks. Following Suzuki's excuse that the issue only arises with bikes that have flashed or kit ecu's this has been taken up by with Zoshimura who have checked Worldwide and have apparently stated that there have been no other failures outside the UK therefore it cannot be a problem with the ecu.

To say manufacturers do not warrant their bikes for racing is untrue. If the engine fails as a result of an inherent defect they will replace parts or engines. I know several cases where BMW replaced both parts and engines when they had crank and con rod bolt issues. As soon as a problem arose they took an immediate interest in the issue and resolved the matter even though there were no failures on road bikes. The same applied to the Aprilia RSV4 when the early models had rod issues.
 

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Hello, I am new, I send a greeting to all.
I write from Spain, I have an endurance team and this year we run with two suzuki gsxr 1000r, I am looking for information on crankshaft problems, we have two l7 and in one we have already broken an engine, I am afraid of breaking the second motorcycle, the engine is totally standard, we only have flashed the ecu with FETECU, can you help me what could be the cause? Suzuki Spain is not responsible, I have answered denying the guarantee and I have been told that they have no record of this problem .....
Thank you
 

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since I am new, it does not let me hang pictures, it's broken just like the image that another friend hung
You can use the forum pic-uploader to post pics;if you post a link for the pics it won't go through as you need to reach a 10 post minimum before the site will allow it.
 

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Discussion Starter #93
Hello, I am new, I send a greeting to all.
I write from Spain, I have an endurance team and this year we run with two suzuki gsxr 1000r, I am looking for information on crankshaft problems, we have two l7 and in one we have already broken an engine, I am afraid of breaking the second motorcycle, the engine is totally standard, we only have flashed the ecu with FETECU, can you help me what could be the cause? Suzuki Spain is not responsible, I have answered denying the guarantee and I have been told that they have no record of this problem .....
Thank you
Following discussions with a Dutch team running a Suzuki at Assen at the weekend apparently there have been two failures in Holland. Latest thought is that there could be a problem with the hardening process causing the cranks to be brittle. Currently being checked by a reputable Motorsport engineering company who have a metalagist who can hopefully confirm or otherwise this possibility. This makes sense looking at the failure. Cranks used for racing may need checking for correct treatment.
 

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Following discussions with a Dutch team running a Suzuki at Assen at the weekend apparently there have been two failures in Holland. Latest thought is that there could be a problem with the hardening process causing the cranks to be brittle. Currently being checked by a reputable Motorsport engineering company who have a metalagist who can hopefully confirm or otherwise this possibility. This makes sense looking at the failure. Cranks used for racing may need checking for correct treatment.
The people that i know that are building superbikes have been getting there cranks cryogenically hardened (freeze hardening)

But this is not uncommon in real SBK builds, no crank failures have been reported this season in these teams
But this is no more than covering your ass for racing purposes

the fact that this is being made into a major topic on this forum, where i would guess the biggest amount of owners are gathered, and how many owners have reported problems? in total or just on this forum?

Different if you are going to be build a full blown superbike or dragging (i.e. real dragging, not just light to light casual user stuff)

Will be interesting to check the part number on the cranks when the 2019 is release, incase suzuki has actually changed something.
 

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Discussion Starter #95
The people that i know that are building superbikes have been getting there cranks cryogenically hardened (freeze hardening)

But this is not uncommon in real SBK builds, no crank failures have been reported this season in these teams
But this is no more than covering your ass for racing purposes

the fact that this is being made into a major topic on this forum, where i would guess the biggest amount of owners are gathered, and how many owners have reported problems? in total or just on this forum?

Different if you are going to be build a full blown superbike or dragging (i.e. real dragging, not just light to light casual user stuff)

Will be interesting to check the part number on the cranks when the 2019 is release, incase suzuki has actually changed something.
Looked into the cryogenic process which does not harden the materials but changes the molecular structure after the machining process which is supposed to stress relieve the material. Not a process now particularly favoured in the Motorsport engineering world. The Suzuki backed team in the UK is replacing cranks every meeting to be on the safe side. The breakages should be investigated by Suzuki but they are in denial.
That fact that some cranks appear to be okay suggests that there is a manufacturing problem with the others that have broken.
If it can be proven the broken cranks are as a result of incorrect hardening then at least there will be a way forward. A new crank can then be checked to make sure it has the correct hardness.
For drag racing I would use a billet crank similar to those used for the Hyabusa.
 

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For drag racing I would use a billet crank similar to those used for the Hyabusa.
Stock OEM Busa crank can hold in excess of 600rwhp;billet crank is used primarily when adding stroke ;)
 

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Technically you can take Suzuki to court for refusing to honor the warranty, as they must prove that the modification caused the failure. If they cannot prove it, they cannot deny the warranty in any way that would hold up in court.
 

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^^ Yup,good ole' Magnuson-Moss Act..but would that only be applicable in the USA ?
 

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Bradley Ray (BSB) at knockhill certainly looked like a a crank failure.
Sert Suzuki @ Suzuka blows up.......Hmmmm
 
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