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Thought you guys would probably give the best answers. Being that racers tend to understand what a motorcycle is actually doing at any given time.

Why is it that when the front wheel comes up while leaned over the bike seems to almost immeadiately stand straight up?

Is it my body positioning? Or is it just a natural effect caused by applying torque to the rear wheel? Why does it not want to stay leaned over and still on one wheel?

I did notice that it does not seem to want to stand upright as much if I am steady on the gas once the wheel comes up, but if you are hard on the throttle and the wheel comes up, it stands straight up really quickly. I have even found myself trying to position my weight off to the side of the bike to try and keep it leaned over, but the forces are to great and the bike stands up anyways.

And just to keep things clear, when I say stands up, I'm referring to the bikes lean angle, not the angle of the front wheel off the ground.
 

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Here is your "R"
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Simple bro, more speed means you need more force to keep the bike leaned over. If you hit the front brake it will do the same, it will try to force you to the outside. Ever notice the faster you go into a turn the more effort/leverage is needed to get the bike to turn in.

You really shouldnt be getting on the gas till after you pass the apex, getting on the gas hard at the apex is a quick way to making a visit to highside city.
 

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Why is it that when the front wheel comes up while leaned over the bike seems to almost immeadiately stand straight up?
Force diagram.

The force of the pavement is no longer there, before the front wheel cleared, the pavement prevented it from righting itself - the rim could not sweep down into the pavement; allowing the bike to "stand up". As the engine torque'd the frame and raised the front wheel, it cleared the pavement, this allowed the sweeping motion to right the machine normal to the center of gravity.

The weight of the rider and machine also palys a role, but in your example, you are only interested in the lack of pavement captivation.
 

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Well, gyroscopic precession may very well be playing a part here too. Consider that due to the centrifugal force (call it inertia if you want) placed on anything in rotation, it wants to let go and continue in a straight line. Much like if you swung a ball on a string around and let go, it would go flying off in a straight direction, a bike wants to "let go" in a turn and fly off to the outside (i.e. when you crash and off the track you go). Ok, now that we have this out of the way...

When you wheelie in a turn, the front wheel is no longer in contact with the ground. However, the natural tendency isn't for the bike to just swing upward because of leverage, otherwise we'd never turn the thing. However, when the front wheel lifts, it no longer has friction to keep it from sliding outward - picture the front of your bike like the ball on a string, it wants to fly out in a straight line - except the back end is attached to it, and is still stuck to the ground.

Now, if you have read up on a gyroscope, you know that precession causes a sideways force applied to it's axis to appear 90 degrees away. The rotation upward about the axle itself doesn't do anything gyroscopic, however the sideways motion outward (like pushing the "gyro" to one side), would likely translate into a force which seems to lift the bike upright - basically because the gyro would push up and down, not side to side (remember, 90 degrees).

Anyway, this all makes sense to me. But it's 1am and I am drunk. So I make no guarantees about it's translation into something logical. w00t!
 
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