Suzuki GSX-R Motorcycle Forums Gixxer.com banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everybody

I´m new to this great site, and this is my first post.

I have an 98´GSX-R 750 (FI) with 18K kilometers on the clock(aprox. 11K miles) , that I have bought from a guy that imported it from Italy, I my self live in Denmark (therefore I hope you will excuse my poor English :rolleyes )

Enough chitchat, now to my question.

I have read the "sticky" post about the manual Cam chain tensioner replacement, but unfortunately, it does not cover this issue.

I don´t know if the cam chain tensioner has been replaced on my bike, and I don´t want to take the chance and see what might happen, therefore my plan is to change it my self. I have ordered a "replacement kit" from the Suzuki distributor here in Denmark. The service technician i talked to, told me that the "upgraded" kit included some "guide rails" (I believe he said two guide rails, but are not sure) that needed to be replaced as well, the rails are some sort of "guide rails" fore the cam chain, and should be a bit wider than the original ones.

Does anybody know if I have to take out the camshaft(s) in order to be able to replace these guide rails?
If I look in the Service manual there are only described the complete engine removal, not if it is possible to do the chain guide replacement with or with out the camshafts in place.

Any comments regarding this issue, are very much appreciated. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
Buggi,
I don't have a factory shop manual yet so all I can do is recommend that you contact the guy who posted the Manual Tensioner installation thread. Or, you could P.M. him.
The Manual is going to be high on your things to buy list, do it!
There is a guy who posts' under the handle - bugman - . There is a link on one of his alternate sites for an outfit offering the manuals for around $75.00 US.
I think this will get you there Http://bugman.81x.com or, Http://bugman2.81x.com.
FWIW
While the components have changed significantly over the years the theory and application of a component remains/operates the same way.
In my experience the old 1966/1967 Honda 305's and later Honda 350/450 models differed only in a 'slipper shoe' being added to the 350/450. The slipper is basically a phenelic (Old Style) or a teflon coated metal shoe that keeps the chain as it from flopping around as it stretches over time. The ones on my old Suzuki 750's, 1100's, and 1150 models were coated versions till an aftermarket and factory change in which the entire slipper shoe/guide was non-metallic. Early versions of these were often shreded because owners thought they could adjust the tension at any pistion position at any part of the crank/cam rotation cycle.
When in reality it was TDC on compression stroke of #1 piston.
Again, for what it's worth.
On the old (70's 80's, early 90's) Jap bikes you could remove the manual cam chain adjuster by removing from 4 to 6 bolts that attached the camchain tensioner plate/housing to the rear center of the cylinder head, after retracting and locking the tension rod/spring to the rear at TDC #1 piston on compression stroke. While anything is possible, if the guide itself wasn't attached to the tensioner housing you had to pull the engine in most case -no vertical room over the engine studs - to do a partial tear down. Things may have changed...
You might also want to ask -get the manual- if the auto tensioner will stay in one piece when you remove it. I don't know if there are circlips, etc... to keep the tensioner together after you pull it off.
If your engine isn't sounding like there is a very loose chain -you can hear it-, don't rip into it just yet. If ithe bike hasn't been severely thrashed wait till the 20,000 mile check-up and do the swap before you adjust the valves.
Good Luck
Keep us posted on results.
Please send me a large box full of those gorgeous women you have stashed over there. Been a long time since I traveled thru Denmark & Sweden. sigh
later.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
23,398 Posts
In order to get to the bolts that secure the "slipper" rails you'll need to remove the advancer assembly. I dont think you can sneak the slippers past the cam sprockets but you'll know right away then you've got them loose if its possible or not. I havent been in the top end for a few months and have forgotten if there is clearance around the cam sprockets but i think not...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
966 Posts
Yes need to remove cams and starter clutch to replace cam chain guides. It is possible to do, I've done it on a 96 and am going to do it again on my 98. Best thing to do is valve shim adjustment at the same time. The guides are good to replace. There are two versions one for 96-98 and the second updated version for 99. I dont know what the difference is between the two different guides but I did post asking this question and no one replyed. I guess you would have to have both versions in front of you to see what the difference is and which is better? Good Luck:cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
REARSPROCKET said:
Yes need to remove cams and starter clutch to replace cam chain guides. It is possible to do, I've done it on a 96 and am going to do it again on my 98. Best thing to do is valve shim adjustment at the same time. The guides are good to replace. There are two versions one for 96-98 and the second updated version for 99. I dont know what the difference is between the two different guides but I did post asking this question and no one replyed. I guess you would have to have both versions in front of you to see what the difference is and which is better? Good Luck:cheers
Thanx for the reply.

As I was told by the Suzuki technician at the Suzuki headquarters here in Denmark, the difference between the to set of guide rails should be the width, as the new updated ones (99-00) are wider than the old ones from 96-98.

I have received the parts that I ordered to do the job, and it included two guide rails, one small one, for the top, and a bigger one that the cam chain adjuster is pushing on, to tighten the chain. I guess that the second "big" guide rail for the other side of the engine, has no changes, since this was not included in the "upgrade kit" that I received.

I have not yet begun the work on the bike, so I can´t tell for sure, if the only difference on the guide rails is the width, but I will confirm it, as soon as I know for sure :)

Just to be sure; When I´m doing the valve adjustment, the procedure is as follows;
first measure valve clearance, then take out cams, replace guide rails, then adjust valve clearance with shims, then re-mount cams, measure valve clearance again, if all is OK, then job done... Correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A little update :)

I have now completed the replacement, and it´s spinning like a dream :punk

In the sticky tread: GSX-R SRAD cam chain tensioner replacement , the talk is all about only changing the hydraulic tensioner, with a manual one. I guess thats all fine(I however went for the original replacement part from Suzuki)... Butt... In the service bulletin from Suzuki, they state that the cam chain tensioner guides need to be replaced to.
At first i did not quite understand why that was so, but after inspecting the old one´s I replaced, i now understand :D

I´ve attached some pics of the old one i have replaced(I also replaced the top guide rail, but no pic, sorry)
If you take a close look at the point where the chain tensioner press against the rail, you can see that the rail is very deform, actually it looks like it´s one it´s way of center, which properly would be very bad :eek

The new guide rail is thicker than the old one, the point of that, is that the tensioner don´t have to extend so much to reach the rail, which will make it more precise when pushing on the guide rail.
The old rail is made out of steel, and coated with some kind of fiber material, the new rail is also steel, but is only coated on the surface towards the chain. The point where the tensioner push on to, is all steel, and again more precise than the soft fiber material.
It is very clear to see why Suzuki recommends that the rails are changed to, IMO. :)


The top guide rail, which purpose is to insure that the chain stays on the two cam wheels, also need to be changed, the difference between the old and the new one, is that the new one is a bit longer/thicker, so that it even more, keeps the chain on it´s right place.

If any one have corrections, or comments please bring it on :)

Sorry for my poor English :rolleyes
 

Attachments

1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top