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The most common issue I have seen since the SRADs came out are charging issues. I rarely went a week in my shop without one or two coming in with the complaint...my battery keeps dying. I also saw issues with electrical malfunctions on other brands, but I'll leave that alone.
The most common cause of charging issues was a poor connection between the stator and the rectifier. I found out quickly that there are two plug-in connections. One where the stator plugs into the main harness and another where the harness connects to the rectifier. Both connections suffer from overheating caused by wire connectors not having good contact with each other.
My own bike decided to fail at the track one day and if I wanted to race, it meant that I would have to fix it with what I had on hand. When I checked the rectifier connection it was mostly melted. What to do? I scrounged around the pit area and not a soul had what I wanted...a solder gun and solder...so I stripped the wires back as far as possible and twisted them together as tight as I could.
I kept the battery charger on until it was grid time and then went out to race. When I got back in, I checked the battery voltage and I had 10.8 vdc. I put the charger back on and decided to stop trying to fix it at the track because I didn't have what I needed, and it was stressing me. The rest of the weekend I ran it total loss with no problems.
When I got the shop on Tuesday and finished doing all my customer work, I took the GSXR apart and delved into the issue.
In the final result, I wired the stator straight to the rectifier bypassing the wire harness and soldered the wires. When I ohmed the rectifier, it had two bad diodes. I had another rectifier, so I put in in and everything was good.
What have I learned about GSXR charging issues? Bypass the harness and go straight from the stator to the rectifier. Don't use plugs...solder all the connections. The other demon is the white connector under the left air duct. Corrosion in that connector also causes problems, so I rewired it.
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Even though I totally get it, this makes sense function wise, but hardwiring all of the connectors really goes against my grain. Wouldn't it be better, if everything is still working like it should, to just clean these connectors and maintain them properly from then on?

:unsure:

@Askor

Thanks for the tip, I still have the old original regulator on it, might put the MOSFET type in instead.
 

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Even though I totally get it, this makes sense function wise, but hardwiring all of the connectors really goes against my grain. Wouldn't it be better, if everything is still working like it should, to just clean these connectors and maintain them properly from then on?

:unsure:

@Askor

Thanks for the tip, I still have the old original regulator on it, might put the MOSFET type in instead.
Cool thing (literally) about the MOSFET regulators is how they only draw what the bike needs from the stator, meaning the notorious 3pin stator connector lasts a lot longer, as well as the stator itself.
That's compared to a standard shunt type regulator, which draws max power from the stator all the time, and whatever the bike doesnt use gets turned into heat!

I like buying second hand FH020AA regulators from bike wreckers on ebay. Much cheaper than new.
Cycle Terminal carries good quality connectors for them (Furukawa QLW 250) at a reasonable price as well as a suitable crimper, Hero BL-255.
 
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