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Yeah, what he said. Your 34 and probably alot more mature than when you were 23. Just respect it and know how deep the water is before you pull the trigger. If you don't trust yourself, don't do it(as in buy the 1000)
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I know that speed can be easily controlled with throttle control. The part that concerns me is the "situation" that will certainly arise where super quick reflexes will be needed. Does the bike have some forgiving tendencies when it comes to aggresive emergency braking, instantanous cornering, or even rolling on the throttle out of a corner?
Does anyone here actually have a GSXR1000 as their first bike? If so, have you encountered any "suprises" so far?
 

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I have both a GSXR 750 and a 1000. I say go with the 750. I have had experience with 5 bikes so far, and up until i got the '03 1000, I thought those thigns were fast. I was worng, this 1000, even with years and years of experience ( 40 ) is a handfull. The power is outrageous, I think you would enjoy the cycle sport/hobby alot more if you got a 600 or 750 gsxr for a first bike, they are still very fast, just not as "twitchy" throttle wise as the 1000 is like a race horse just waiting to be given a little slack, as she will run away with your arms.
 

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I had a 88 750, and a 93 zx-7 before getting this one. Like you the price was too good to pass up, but my life was worth more that the savings. I took it upon myself to ask the guys I rode with, that know their stuff, if I would be ok with it. Not on the bike side of things, but if they would feel comfortable with me on the bike, and comfortable with riding with me. Seemed to me to be a good way to gauge my readiness. I can be honest with myself, but nobody is going to admit they suck, or are not good enough for something. But your friends will.

Personally my biggest concern is getting into trouble one time, and accidentally twisting the throttle to much. Proper riding position will help with that though. As for Dirtbike experience I had that too, but I feel all too often that leads people into an false sense of security. You can fall on a dirtbike, and be up riding again in 5 mins once you take a leak to put out the fire started by the hot exhaust
, but that doesn't happen with a sport bike.

I'd say start smaller. Just because no matter how fast the bike is, there will still be someone who can drive circles around you on a 500EX. A smaller bike is one less thing to worry about on the drive. Not to mention you won't feel as bad when you drop it.

I remember a quote in a mag I read before I bought mine. The guy said "I could say this bike is more than I need, but it would be a lie. Its more than anyone needs".
 

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which kills people more easily, a bb gun or an m60?
What has a brain and can decide to kill another human being more easily:
a bb gun, an m60 or a person?

take that democrat shit somewhere else
 

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no comment

*starts making calls to local salvage buisnesses to hold on to gsxr 1000 parts*
 

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Man if I had a dollar for everytime this question was asked...dude, lot's of people will tell you lot's of different things, and it's all based on their own experience and the things they've seen in other people's experiences.

Theoretically the pilot is ultimately the determining factor when assessing whether or not the bike is suitable for a person's skill level. You really won't know until you try. But it is in that risk that people here are trying to warn you of. The law of large numbers is against you on this one. Most people who have gone down the road you're thinking of travelling have often failed. Some crashed and lived to tell, some didn't. So it's really up to you.

One of the most traditional means of becoming the best rider you can be safely and efficiently, is to start off in the dirt. From there progress into the street bikes, smaller cc bikes such as 250's for example, and then moving up as skill level improves to the 500 or 600, 750 and eventually the litrebikes (although a lot of people like staying with the middleweights too....) . Now I myself have not done it this way, and many good riders have done it differently as well. It's not the only way, but from what I understand from riders better then me, is a time proven way.

I had a friend too, that started on an r1. Not to say that this is going to happen to you, but he ended up on the outside of a corner on the side of the road after taking out a street sign. He was allright though thankfully, but hasnt ridden since for almost 9 months now. He was doing fine all the way up to that point, but one day decided that he had the skills to go from taking corners at 70-80, to 130-140 like the "fast guys". So to make a long story short, you may be able to handle the bike, but your learning curve will be slower, and that's something you need to understand. Because if you decide to do certain things before you're ready to, the litrebikes wont be as forgiving as the smaller bikes will when you make a mistake.

Just my two cents. Take care, find religion, and good luck.
 

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I just peurchase my k3 a week ago and was very suprise at how well it handle and easy to ride ....yes its a very powerful bike ..but also very easy to control ....just take it easy and i'm sure u do just fine ....
 

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I rode a '91 CBR600F2 for 8 years before I bought my '03 1000 in August. For the first two weeks I had the bike, I was definitely scared of it. I didn't get on it until having it for at least a few weeks. Now I'm really comfortable with the bike. I wheelie it all the time and have had it up to the high side of 160mph quite a few times and up to an indicated 183mph once.

I believe in the philosophy that even a n00b rider can hop a fast bike if he rides within his skill level. However, that doesn't mean that I'd encourage an inexperienced rider to get a liter-class bike.

If this G1K is such a great deal, then buy it and park it in your garage. Ride something more mundane for a few thousand miles and then take the Gixxer out for a ride or two and see if you are ready to start learning how to handle it. If you're not, park it and put another thousand miles on the slower bike. Repeat, until you're ready for the Gixxer.
 

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I bought a 1k 03 as a first bike back in early Nov and everything is going great.. if you search for my thread back in the day youll see that I had 30 people telling me I am going to die... well I am still here and f-uck you all that put me down... anyway... I am canyon riding now and such and having a great time.. I am learning at a slow curve and respecting the bike. I have not come close to crashing yet... but you know the saying "everybody crashes".. its just a matter of when how why where ect. But, I as far as the power that the bike gives you, its all relative to how you ride .. below 6k or so RPM the bike acts like a 600... so just watch your wrist and crawl up to hitting the RPM's harder and you will be ok.,, the biggest thing with a 1000 is ride your own ride... dont let ego or friends push you.... I have almost 5000 miles on my bike and I am going great.. dont let these clowns talk you down.. they wish they had been mature enough to handle a 1000 as thier first bike
 

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Be patient and wait for 04 750. A calculated guess tells me that is going to be a winner.Perfect combination of power and handling


On the other hand, if you realy want the 1000, go buy it. Considering your age and dirtbike experience it shouldn't be a problem. It's up to your self. Just take it step by step in getting to know the bike and you will be fine.

I'd say the 1000 can be quite forgiving to ride because of the tremendous low and mid range power. No need to come hauling into corners in the high revs.
When I adjusted my self back to sportbike riding with my 1000, after 10 years without a bike, I tried to take the corners one gear higher of what would be "normal". Worked for me.

Have fun.
 

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When I first started riding street bikes 4 years ago, I was your age and my experience was solely from riding motocross (including 3 years of racing). I bought a CBR 929 and I had no problem at all, I just took it easy and learned gradually. Body position is totally different from dirt riding but in about three months I was already dragging my knee and feeling comfortable. However I do agree that the gixxer 1000 is a wilder beast than the 929, and things would have been less easy.
If you really feel like it, give it a try but be VERY careful...
 

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it was my first bike. i just took it easy for a year. i treated it like iT was on a 600. Far from a 600, but that's what i kept telling myself. i'm still here & fell once on a wet leaf at that doing 3 miles an hour coming to a stop. i have 14,000 miles under my belt. i didn't want to by a 600, so i was gonna buy a 750 & then i thought i mine as well spend the extra thousand so i wouldn't have to go thru the trouble of selling the 750 after i was tired of it. i hear the 750 is a great bike but i wanted the 1000 after reading the 2001 issue of JACK THE RIPPER. So i bought the 02 & then bought the 03. 03 ROCKS!All the guys are probably right saying you should get something lower. If you buy the 1000, just be carefull, RESPECT THE KING GIXXER.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Well I'm going to go and look at the bike tonight with cash in hand. I won't be able to drive it because its basically a frozen tundra where I live.
I'm really torn on what to do and all the various opinions on here haven't helped much! (I'm not suprised)
In any case, if the bike is as in good as shape as he claims it to be - I'll most likely buy it. He needs the loan paid off yesterday and is willing to sell it for his "pay off" cost which is well under $7000.00

details to follow......
 

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I personally would buy it & turn around and sell it for more! Then use that money for your BRAND NEW 04/750!!! That's just my .02!!! Let us know what happens & good luck!!!
 

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Gwalker99 said:
I bought a 1k 03 as a first bike back in early Nov and everything is going great.. if you search for my thread back in the day youll see that I had 30 people telling me I am going to die... well I am still here and f-uck you all that put me down... anyway... I am canyon riding now and such and having a great time.. I am learning at a slow curve and respecting the bike. I have not come close to crashing yet... but you know the saying "everybody crashes".. its just a matter of when how why where ect. But, I as far as the power that the bike gives you, its all relative to how you ride .. below 6k or so RPM the bike acts like a 600... so just watch your wrist and crawl up to hitting the RPM's harder and you will be ok.,, the biggest thing with a 1000 is ride your own ride... dont let ego or friends push you.... I have almost 5000 miles on my bike and I am going great.. dont let these clowns talk you down.. they wish they had been mature enough to handle a 1000 as thier first bike

im not going to go digging for your thread but you asked for advice, got it, and now you are talking shit on those that gave you their advice??
thats sad
 

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Look, you COULD do it, especially if you are intelligent, mature, and stay within your limits. The question is if you WANT to.

Frankly it just won't be as much fun as the 750, and you won't learn as fast.

The bike itself is actually very forgiving of almost everything. With the exception of the throttle. If you sneeze wrong and that moves your hand a little, whamo!, it will lunge forward like a bat out of hell. Likewise in a corner, the back wheel is always ready to slip out on someone who doesn't know exactly how much throttle NOT to give.

If it is such a good deal, you could always do the opposite of what some guys do. They go for super power mods and that, but these are reversible. Yeah. I'm talking ADD a tooth to the front sprocket, REMOVE a couple teeth from the back sprocket. Now the thing acts like a 750 with automatic transmission... heh heh. Also a lot of race schools put throttle limiters on their 600's, to keep you from using more than 1/2 throttle, or 3/4, or whatever. Fact is, it is even easier to snip the balls OFF a bike than it is to add them.
Yet you never hear people talking about that, only about adding power and telling newer riders to stay away.

Then when you are ready for it, a couple super cheap mods puts it back in stock form.

If it were me I'd still go with a "disposable bike" and use it like toilet paper for my first year. Like an EX-500.
 

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Gixxer 1K was my first sportbike after some years in the dirt, and some street time on a KLR650 (rode on a RF900R... but that was only a few hundred miles). The bike is great for acceleration, but I worry about theft quite a bit, insurance is high, and I don't think I'm as comfortable on the bike as I would be on a 750. That being said, being the bike it is, I'm glad I'm not too comfortable...keeps me on my toes.

If I had to do it again, I'd buy a mid 90's sportbike (I'd get a 750-900cc) and pay less for insurance, and the bike. If you crash it, just buy another one...

As others have said, just keep it in the lower rev's, and it'll treat ya fine. I actually think the bike isn't that bad for someone with some motorcycle experience, becasue of stable handling, and good brakes (gotta watch out for those too... had to stop for a car that jutted in front of me from behind some trees... squeezed progressively into a small stoppie).
 
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