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Just to be certain, I would clean that entire area and the plug and check again. Sometimes things run down from areas you wouldn't expect!

I would use a gentle plastic brush and some engine degreaser or simple green and just brush off all the dirt around that whole area. Run the motor again and watch for a new drip/weep, and touch or smell it to confirm it is oil or coolant.

In my experience, drain plugs don't usually ever leak, especially after changing the washer like you mentioned. I'd say clean it up and check again and show us the results.

Hope this helps.
-Mike
 

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It sounds like you're pretty sure this is the source of the leak.

If that is true, I would be pretty picky about reinstalling a sealing washer on it, and making sure it is clean. It's just like cleaning a drain bolt surface. Use Q-tips or scotchbrite or something to make sure you get all of the gunk out of the orifice prior to installing a new gasket washer, and clean the bolt head as well.

When I do any engine work, the parts I take off at least get a thorough top to bottom cleaning before going back on, just to ensure that there is zero dirt, dust, debris, or other bits that could ruin the motor. So if it was me, I would take the bolt out, clean it up with a tiny wire wheel on my dremel to scrape out any buildup in the threads or head, wash the bolt in solvent with a toothbrush, rinse it all off, install a new gasket washer, wipe out the threads on the engine and thoroughly scrub the mating/sealing surface with paper towels or scotchbrite if needed to get it perfectly clean, and then torque it down.

In my book, the only way to guarantee a leak fix is to first do those steps, and don't cut any of those corners. Some dirt or rocks on the threads or in the block or stuck to the washer can prevent it from sealing right, and then damage the sealing surface next time you take it off, making it hard to ever seal ever again.

In fact, for gasket surfaces on engine parts, I usually wet-sand the engine cover or part with 800-1000 grit paper on a glass or machined surface, and it makes them absolutely perfect to seal up. Of course, doesn't really apply to sealing bolts, but you get the idea.

If you did all that and it still leaks, I'd suggest replacing the bolt, and then like Bill said, maybe look into a new sealing option.

Hope this helps, I believe you if you say you've cleaned it all super well and are certain it is coming from here.
Folks, the wetness above the bolt can be due to the wind from riding the bike, this is the front lower portion of the engine, and thus why the drip pattern may look odd. I wouldn't be so quick to assume OP is not capable of finding the leak source, lol.

-Mike
 
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