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Good read. Thanks for taking the time to write it. I'm looking at getting my first bike next year and I want to be armed with the mistakes others make so I don't.
 

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b.s. is it cut and paste??a new 600 is more stable and confidence inspiring, and i'm not even gonna talk about fiability.................
 

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No offense, but he didnt write that, I have seen it on a multitude of other sites, and I know they didnt originate from this forum. :nono
 

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Okay and your point would be what? He said he edited them for space he didn't say he wrote it.

:rolleyes

The point is not who wrote the fucking thing, it's the content assholes. It's GOOD advice.
 

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i bought my k5 600 the beginning of the summer. i adapted great and i think i can ride quite well.

but... know a couple of people who have done the same, and they should have started with a smaller bike.
 

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Excellent post man! but ive actually started on a 07 600cc gsxr, and im very very glad i did not start on a puny 250, i would have wanted to get rid of it after 2 months...to me the 600 was the way to go. I had most of the same reasons you put upthere to get a new 600, i did not want to hassle with re-selling it in 6 months, i wanted a gsxr for 3 years and now i have the money to get one, so i did...And im very glad i did.

I think poeple need to use there common sense on things, ive always been a very fast learner, so i got used to my 600 in like 3 weeks. Some people who do not learn as fast or cant addapt to riding as fast should start at a 250. But if you have the common sense to know you can kill yourselfe everytime you go riding, your gonna be good on a 600.
 

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Everytime I see someone post the usual "Why people shouldn't start on sports bikes" or "600+ cc bikes" threads, I shake my head... I know from the outside it may seem they're trying to be noble (nobel?), but truth be told, deep inside, EGO is what drives them to do so...

When I'm approached and asked what a good starter bike is, I always ask.... What would piss you off the least if you scuffed it up a few times while learning?

There are MANY factors that can make ANY bike right/wrong for a beginner, but I think the least is the engine size. General weight, handling characteristics, and throttle smoothness/twitchiness are probably bigger concerns that the absolute beginner should keep in mind. This is where more seasoned riders should step in and help out... Not make it an egotistical session of trying to convince them that they should not get a bike like theirs because they're newbs...

I have known MANY people who have started on liter bikes, and to this day have remained accident free... Not to mention, they have taken the time to truly learn the bikes limit, always preceded by their own limits.

I have known quite a few (can't say many here) who have started on 250 ~ 500's, and have been shopping for fairing pieces within just a few weeks.

I think the answer to this ongoing topic should always be tailored to the person who intends to learn. It is the responsibility of those providing the advice to do so with sincerity, leave their egos behind, and realize that sometimes there's more to learning how to ride than how much (or how little) horsepower is "too much".

I don't expect everyone to agree... But I hope at least some will stop and think "Hmm, there's some truth to these statements".
 

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I didn't even read this, but i have an experience to share. I went to a party last night, no I'm not really at the partying age anymore, but hey. I met this college kid, talking up a STORM about his new R6. Talkety talk talk talk. Saying: "man it's about balance and bla de bla", he was actually making some sense. First bike he ever owned, rode out of the dealer, first time pulling a clutch with his hand. Long story short, a beer later he says he actually no longer owns this bike (06' mind you, i.e. not long), and he wrecked twice and showed me a nasty scar on his side. I was then talking to other kids who are so fascinated by the "image" of motorcycles. More talk. I'm like "dude, I don't want to talk to you anymore, my advise is to get a nice big helmet, two pairs of jeans and a 800 dollar bike and go out to your grandad's place and learn, come back, sell the bike if you didn't wreck it and get a bike you have earned to ride. I have been riding for 20 years and I think about selling my bike all the time for family and safety, I'm still scared every day, but I haven't wrecked badly yet after 30k miles or so, so I just ride with caution. Ramble ramble. I hate seeing motorcycling getting so poserish lately.
 

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Ahhh, thank you EddieSV for the relief. I was shaking violently from anger reading all these damn ignorant posts. First an idiot with a long boring post, then a whole bunch of headnodders. There seems to be a lot of people who are so definite in their minds. If you bother to think for a split second, the scary son of a bitch is on the bike, not vice versa. And let's face it, sensible people try to be safe, whilst crazy people tend to find ways of killing themselves.

Just be careful, start off slow
 

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This is just my opinion, but I think that anyone who wishes to ride on the street should consider learning how to ride off-road first. This way, the concepts involved in controlling a bike can become second nature BEFORE sticking your neck out in traffic.

And, while I am not a big fan of government regulations when it comes to rights and riding I do think that Europe has the right idea concerning licensing. Beginning soon licensing in Europe will be a three tier system that will require riders to gain experience on smaller displacement and lower HP bikes before being able to have an unrestricted license. As I understand, it will take 4 years of riding before restrictions on size/power are lifted.
 

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I can't agree more with what was said here by Ride. All through my life my parents told me that i was never to have or even ride a bike even though my father had always owned a bike (harley davidson.) Several years went by (till the start of this year and i'm 21 now) and my mates and i all decided to go and get our licences together, which we did. After this (about 1 week) one of my mates purchased a 05 gsx-r 750 and soon after my other mate got a 05 gsx-r 600. I however remained bike-less due to parental control. After a few months i convinced dad to let me start riding the 'hog' around with my mates. Even though it was a 1450cc, its huge mass made it quite a docile ride. It was on this that i 'learnt' how to ride. Within about 3 months of owning his bike, the 750 owner had pulled out of his drivway (on an incline) crossed the centre lines, gave it the tinies bit of accellelator (i do mean very small twist) and had it throw him off. We worked out that there was a combination of shifting his weight on the seat, slightly damp road, wrong angle of attack and too much throttle that caused the accident. Luckily, there was no other traffic (or it would be a much different story) and he had the AU$2500+ it cost to fix and no real injuries to his body.

When i told my parents this and began talking about motorbikes some more, i head their real reasons and history behind their not wanting me to ride. When they were first married and driving their combi van around the Italian Alps, a bike rider came flying round a blind corner and straight into them and latter died. Neither of them were charged as it was the rider's fault being on the wrong side of the road, but it turned out that he was on a new sport bike (for the time) and new to riding. He didn't know that turning into the corner and giving it some rabbit caused the new rear wheel to slide out and throw him into a car?

When they returned (to Australia) from their terrible experiance many months latter dad could only afford to buy a bike to commute to work each day. As luck would have it one night comming home along a road he had been along everyday, he managed to get out of shape and drop his kawasaki triple. Wrecked the bike and his gear but he was realatively unharmed.

After this story and back to the now time, my mate with the 600 agreed to let me borrow his bike for the weekend to go for a ride with my dad. We hit the hills and everything was fine.... till it wasn't. I was coming around a blind corner so was below the speed limit but right at the apex was a fallen tree branch that was not there an hour ago. My reaction was to slam on the front brakes which of course straightened me up and into the other lane where other traffic was heading straight into me. I narrowly managed to escape and got on with the ride. However it just made me realise how such inexperiance on a supersport could have just killed me.

So now with this knowledge behind me, and several months 'Hog' experiance, dad agreed to help me buy myself a bike. I managed to find a 07 Gsx-R 750 with low k's (milage) for sale at a very good price. Once purchased, i spent hours reading sites such as and inclucing this one and talking to anyone i could about riding. I held off 5 days and didn't ride it till i got new springs for the front suspension (i'm a big boy 6'5" 110kg/242pounds) so it didn't shake as i cornered. Once this was done and the bike having a clean bill of health from my trusted suzuki dealer, i began riding small rides with dad and mates, starting at about 30 min and working up to a couple of hours. This was mostly done on clear straight roads. After i felt i was confident handling the bike, both dad and me went on an intermediate riding / defencive riding course taken by a mob called Stay Upright (i hate to plug stuff normally BUT by god they deserve it) It involved a night lecture and a full day riding (morning ride was in a specially built 'carpark' and the afternoon was on the Mt Cotton Training Track). This course tought me and dad who had been riding most of his life, so much precious knowledge about riding. Best of all it was an awesome day!

What i have learnt:
Bikes are not toys and need to be respected.
Superbikes demand even more respect
Rider knowledge has to be taught and skill refined
Dont wast money on mods till you can ride your bike well. Put your yoshi money towards a training course. You never know, you might just live long enough to enjoy your new pipe.
My first real ride on a GSX-R could have killed me.

There is no shame riding something other than a "Fast Bike" while you are learning. Trust me,, hog was slow as anything but was still able to teach me so much.

All things considdered, I still love riding. To continue to ride you have to love it. You also have to accept that you are (I dont care what statistics or excuses you have, you are wrong) far far more likely to die on a bike than in a car. Your actions and protective clothing are what keeps you alive. Do EVERYTHING that you can to stay alive.
 

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ahh. i was one of those that started on the sportbike. now here's the thing, i learned how to ride when i was about 7 years old. but the bike i learned on was my grandfathers, and had a sidecar to it, and probably was the equivalent of a 250 (maybe up to 500) but not race. I rode that bike until i was about 10. and then stopped. didn't ride again until last year (im 20 right now) so that was a 9 year period.
i decided to buy a bike, never wanted a car, never wanted anything but a bike. so i did. never looked into what i was getting, just went out and bought a gixxer that day.
i was certain that it was the best idea that i've ever had! oh, but i learned.
im pretty sure i didn't actually even go 1' on the bike before i dropped it. the first few feet i did go, i ran into a car... minor tiny scratches for both, but still!!!
while the 1 accident that i was in on the bike was not technically my fault, it could have easily been prevented if only i had some more experience with emergency braking/swerving. a car pulled out in front of me (about 10 feet away) i was only going 20 mph, but i panicked, locked the front brake and flipped the bike.
this didn't happen the next week after i bought it. it was about 10 months later.
i didn't die. didn't go to the hospital. didn't total the bike. but still. i made a mistake, even though it wasn't my fault and this happened.

the reason i've been hesitant to learn on this bike, is because (for example) it's hard to try to see how hard you can brake before the brake locks up, since if it does, then you're looking at a few thousand dollars worth of damage, plus possible hospital bills.

i can say that im a good rider now, after 2 seasons. i havent actually raced, but i've been to the tracks, watched the races. maybe someday.
the problem is, in the last 2 seasons, i spent 8k on a bike, about 4k on repairs to the bike and im still not that great of a rider.
for the injuries, they've been minor: bit through my lip, broke 7/10 fingers, both ancles/wrists sprained, broke 2 ribs, random cases of road rash, random other cases of burning myself riding in shorts when i first started out.
not too bad, but not too great.
maybe some people will look at this and actually reconsider.
get yourself something small, something that doesn't go 130 on a whim and 180 when you're trying, something that wont kill you while you learn.
i actually had some basic riding experience. and it didn't help. or maybe it did, maybe i would have killed myself by now if i havent had that much.
 

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"i spent 8k on a bike, about 4k on repairs to the bike and im still not that great of a rider.
for the injuries, they've been minor: bit through my lip, broke 7/10 fingers, both ancles/wrists sprained, broke 2 ribs, random cases of road rash, random other cases of burning myself riding in shorts when i first started out"

Doesn't sound that minor to me
 

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"i spent 8k on a bike, about 4k on repairs to the bike and im still not that great of a rider.
for the injuries, they've been minor: bit through my lip, broke 7/10 fingers, both ancles/wrists sprained, broke 2 ribs, random cases of road rash, random other cases of burning myself riding in shorts when i first started out"

Doesn't sound that minor to me
yeah... maybe it's not. i never had to be hospitalized, and i've heard/seen quite a few accidents that were much, much worse. so since there was never anything life threatening => minor injuries :punk
 

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It's such a shame tho. It really says to me (at least) that you have had to learn the hard way. The thing is from what you have said, the bike you were on would have played very little in avoiding nasty situations. :s

I fully recommed that u get some training. In that one day that i did, my bike riding ability AND safe city riding techniques grew 10 fold. I feel that much better about riding now its not funny.
 

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first i would like to say that this post doesnt apply to every rider, but the majority of them. I have bought an 06 750 and havent had any problems with handling, riding, or controlling the bike in anyway. but, i do have to say that i did my homework for about 2yrs prior to buying my moto. i went and took the MSF course, and i have read so much information out there about motorcycle accidents, the causes, the reasons they happened. for that, i feelim a much better rider than some people out there who say,"mommy, daddy, i want a 1000 cuz my friend Dante has one."

i wish more riders out there would pay attention to the information and resources that are available to them to teach us how to ride. we live in an age of information, and yet i still see people dying in horrible motorcycle accidents all the time because the motorcycle was going at a high rate of speed in a residental area. sportbikes can be for beginners, i think i prove that everyday that im alive. by not being stupid and listening to what older riders have told me, and trying hard not to end up on someones windshield, myself and others can ride sportbikes safely and affectivley.
 
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