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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I'm setting this aside for everyone to give some advice to people looking at, buying or riding their first bike. Information, experiences, whatever.

Okay, from me: You've all heard get a 600, get your gear, whatever. I'm going to deal with the 600 part.

Yea, someone, somewhere, will try and make fun of you because you bought a 600. Deal with it and don't worry about it. These are the same guys who buy a 1000 just to say they did. A true rider knows that a better rider can hand him his ass on a 250.

The GSX-R 600 isn't a joke, it isn't a small bike and it isn't a wuss bike. This is a track bike with lights so it's street legal. (this goes fro the 99 style and the 2K1, ridden them both). I've been riding since I was 12 or 13 and I'm 29 now. I've ridden twins, V4's, dirt bikes, street bikes, quads, you name it. The GSX-R 600 isn't something to play with though.

I've had mine for almost a year now and am finally in a groove with it. And I'm learning day by day that power doesn't not make up for a lack of skill, it just amplifies your errors later. The 600 will keep up with the bigger bikes and is slightly more forgiving then the 1 liter bikes. But it takes more skill to get it to the same place (shifting, braking, etc) and you'll learn a lot faster. You won't have the extra power to mask your errors or to help you keep up.

It is the kind of bike that will scare you on a daily basis though. Not a bad scare, usually, but it will wake you up if you start daydreaming. Twist the throttle a bit to much in a low gear...Heh, you'll feel the front end unload and the back tire dig in. It's a fun ride, if you're ready for it. If you're not...Well, just be ready for it.


Anyway, as far as starter bikes go, the GSX-R 600 isn't really a good starter bike. But you could do worse. Would I recommend it as a first bike? Only to someone who is against bikes like the SV650s and such.

Okay, I've rambled enough. I'll let the more experienced riders speak now.


[ 04-11-2002, 04:05 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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The 2K1 GSX-R600 is my first bike and I've had it for a year now. I have to say that a year in I'm really just starting to feel comfortable on it and only now truly believe that I can operate it safely within MY limits. I also believe that being I have to row the gearbox a bit more on a 600, teaches me more about where I should and shouldn't be with regards to thottle and breaking as opposed to just "muscling" my way in and through corners.

I received some invaluble advice the other week from BMF, 1liter and gixxerfever while out on the road.

1. Go at your own pace and not to try to keep up to anyone.

2. Keep it within your limits, it takes a while to really get the hang of it.

3. The more you come out, the more you will learn.

With that said, the gixxer6 is more than enough for a first bike. If they weren't fast... they wouldn't race them. I'll be keeping mine for a couple of more years


[ 04-11-2002, 04:07 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Sexy Irish Man God
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Good post Pulse, will be going to the FAQ

Although I would like to add...

GSXR600 is not a good learner bike


Anyone looking to start riding should not ride any type R bike, big ass Hardley, or anything above 600cc's.
That being said some good learner bikes are:
Buell Blast
Kawisaki EX500
Kawisaki EX250
Honda Nighthawk 250
Honda Rebel 250 (I rode for 2 years happily)
Suzuki Bandit 600
Suzuki GS500
Suzuki SV650

Sportbikes require alot of respect. Now that doesn't mean that no one has started on a sportbike and ended up fine but if you want to learn the correct way, and the fun way go cheap and go used. Learn what a more standard bike can do. There is plenty of time to build from there.
I have said this many times. Everybody drops thier bike while learning. Not crash but drop. Slow turns, manuvering the bike in a garage are all big time places where this happens. Sportbikes have so much easily breakable plastic parts that are very pricey to even mess with.

Buy one of those bikes used. Even the 250 is a good bike for people 150lbs or less. I personally have rode with a couple guys on EX250's that would smoke alot of riders in the twisties. Learn what you can on that more forgiving bike. Sell it after a year for close to what you payed and get whatever you want


jontflesh

[ 04-11-2002, 04:10 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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absolutly
get an ex 500 to start with or somthting of that nature they are great starter bikes,

[ 04-11-2002, 04:13 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Let the people know Tom!!!!!!!

It's just too bad that none of the manufactues make 400cc for the US market. There perfect starter bikes. I rode a Honda CB-1 forever when I first started riding. It was perfect. Cheap, reliable, and forgiving.

Beat the shit out of it, crash it, Flip it over backwards. Great bike.

The best part about a 400 is that it forces you to learn the skills to go fast. Corner speed, brakes, and exit speed. If can go fast on a 400, you can go fast on anything.

So, anyway Tom, When are you gonna get off that bitch bike and get a 750? You do know your girl has a bigger bike than you right?


[ 04-11-2002, 04:13 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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anyone can learn on any size bike....myself, i learned on a '93 CBR 600. i thought it was perfect for me. i was not stupid and didnt crank the throttle when i first got it.

i think as a "general rule" a 250-600 is a great starter bike....but a bike is only as powerful as how much you give it gas. so as long as someone is smart and goes slow, a 1000 could be a learner bike. i have been riding for just over 3 years, so im not an expert, but i went from a 600 to the 1000 without a problem. im not into tricks that much yet, so mabye thats why i was fine with a 600...yea, we all dream of doing stand ups and 60mph stoppies, but if you wait 5 years to try that, you will be a much better rider. my theory is get to know the bike first, once you are comfortable with it, respect it and then start to LEARN the stunts, do DO the stunts and I think if you stick with this kind of theory then riders will have far less accidents
 

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Chip....i bet i can get him on a 750...one day this summer ill let him ride mine...after that it will be history...hes gonna have to have one.

[ 04-11-2002, 04:14 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Any person that makes fun of a rider for riding a 600 is a moron. The 600 isn't the most powerful machine out there, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't deserve respect.

[ 04-11-2002, 04:15 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Argh, I'm trying to keep from going bigger yet.
Figure once I can toss the 600 around like it's a BMX bike then I'll be ready to move up.

Seriously though. Almost a year into it and I'm starting to feel completly fine with my bike. Twisties are a lot of fun and, from the few times I've done it, I've learned a lot from them. Things come up fast at highspeeds though and if I didn't have a lot of the skills down to an instinct I'd probably be decorating a tree by now. I took it real slow for the most part. Didn't ever let myself get into an uncomfortable situation for long and never tried to keep up with the pack leaders. Now I can hang through the turns with the better riders and can keep up, or lead if need be, when I want to. I'll be the first to admit that my wheelies are garbage but they are fun.
My stoppies aren't bad but I don't like what they do to the bike so I don't do them often.

Anyway, I guess what kept me rubber side down was the basics (most of which I'll admit I learned here).

1) Don't try to impress someone. Dead people aren't impressive.

2) Learn at your own pace and don't let ANYONE try and push you.

3) Find good people to ride with. And don't be afraid to not ride with people who make you uncomfortable.

4) Keep your eyes and ears open. Both on the bike and off of it. This will keep you alive while you are on the bike and help you learn while you are off of it.

5) Learn from others mistakes. If someone went wide in turn 2 and lost it. Ask him what he feels is wrong. Or if you hear someone mention why they looped their bike, listen so you don't do the same.

6) Lastly, don't be the quiet one. Ask questions to the point of annoyance, meet as many riders, with as many kinds of bikes, as you can. ASK QUESTIONS. Ignorance can bring death as fast as a SUV going the wrong way.

Okay, enough spam for now.


[ 04-11-2002, 04:15 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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I think 90% of new riders will get big liter bike as a first bike just for pose factor no matter what we say. They think the learning curve is analagous to driving a car but it's not at all. Call me a slow rider but I started out on dirt bike, rode a 500 for a few years, an SV650S and now a 1000. I try and ride within my limits. I'm a good steet rider and am just now learning how to handle twisties (new for me cause my experience riding is all dirt jumps/streetbike). I'm glad I waited to get a big bike like I have now but that's just me. the years on smaller bikes have helped me immensely learn to respect liter bikes.
BTW I think 600 are wicked fast too...it's the rider not the newbie on a 1K.... gotta go

[ 04-11-2002, 04:15 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Originally posted by Pulse:


1) Don't try to impress someone. Dead people aren't impressive.

<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">I dont mean to be a douchbag, but i understand your point completly, but you can be just as dead on a 600 as a 1000.

[ 04-11-2002, 04:16 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Originally posted by divein6:
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by Pulse:


1) Don't try to impress someone. Dead people aren't impressive.

<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">I dont mean to be a douchbag, but i understand your point completly, but you can be just as dead on a 600 as a 1000.</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">That was more of a general thing. It had to do with not trying to impress people while you are riding, not impress them with what bike you pick. Sorry, I should have specified.


[ 04-11-2002, 04:17 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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I'm starting to feel completly fine with my bike.
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">You have now entered the danger zone Tom.

Be careful Pulse, you seem to have a good head on your shoulders and some good advice. Use them.

Good luck my brothers.
-D
 

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Great post! I started on my gixxer 600 but I had about 10 years motocross experience. (I know ill get flamed for this) I felt that even though they are 2 different types of bikes it still did teach me some of the basics, like how important body positioning is and to respect the power of the bike. Its been about a year now and im starting to finally feel at home on my 600.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Originally posted by criminalspeed:
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">I'm starting to feel completly fine with my bike.
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">You have now entered the danger zone Tom.

Be careful Pulse, you seem to have a good head on your shoulders and some good advice. Use them.

Good luck my brothers.
-D
</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Guess I should be clear here too.
I mean that I now feel comfortable with knowing my limits and the bikes. Granted, it wakes me up daily, but I do stay on my toes.

I know that I've used the bike to, maybe, 65-70% of it's potential. But every ride I scrape a little more out of it.


[ 04-11-2002, 04:17 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Well, this is my first bike, and I guess I do all right on it. There have only been two times that my heart started to race. I feel very comfy on my bike. IMHO I think it was a good bike to learn on. Hell, I am still learning. Probably will be all my life.
As for ppl making fun of others riding a 600...they are not only morons, but they are not true riders if you ask me. I really doubt they would still be laughing about it when their buddy on the 600 crashes and dies.
As long as ppl ride within their limits then it really doesn't matter what bike they are on. Just my $.02.

[ 04-11-2002, 04:17 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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Nice post, Pulse. Sounds good to me. I've been riding since 1983, gone through a few bikes, starting really small. 83 Honda MB5 (50cc), 80something honda twinstar 250, 82 Yamaha Seca Turbo (650cc turbocharged), 97 yamaha yzf 600, 01 gsx/r 1k. I started small and cheap, but it was (like you said) much easier to learn all the other things you need to know. From what I've seen/heard (my opinion) I don't know that I would really recommend any of the new 600cc sportbikes as beginner machines with the possible exception of the yamaha yzf 600r. Even with as forgiving as they are, they can get new riders in over their heads and quick.
Of course, heres where I prove my Squidlyness. I went from a 600 to the 1k, because I wanted a bit more power. I was having trouble keeping up with some of my riding partners (r6, r1, rc51, cbr900 (2),gixxer 600) mostly on the straights, I could close the gap in the corners though. Of course, now that I'm in Fl there are no corners. (Used to live in Maine, some great roads in New England)
So I went and threw down on the 1k. Why, I did this made sense to me then. I didn't want to go from a 600 to one that made 10 hp more. Only suzuki makes a 750. The honda 929 didn't feel comfortable to me. then I looked at the 1K's, the R1 and the mighty Gixxer. The yamaha was just missing something, that I cant place. I tried the 750 and the 1K, they feel the same in sitting on them, and for the $900, I figured what the hell (poser value) and got the 1k.
Hell, I can catch anything in a straight line now, but the corners is where I lose time now (pussy factor?)
All I can say is that a newbie on a 1K is most likely an accident looking for a place...
I've been caught out on the 1K, this has so much potential. Of course, I've never ridden a machine that will do fourth gear power wheelies before, especially one that does it with so little persuasion.

One of my neighbors kids wants a sportbike big time, and I've become #1 on her shit list by getting a new bike, that she now has to hear about. (No, I didn't offer to sell my YZF600 to him) I keep telling him that most of the sportbikes are not for beginners and that he should look at either the gs500/550's or the ex500 ninjas. As they are more forgiving and cheaper in most aspects (insurance, crash repair, etc)

Thanks for the great post. Maybe we can lower the nuber of "CRASHED MY BIKE TODAY" and "ANOTHER BROTHER WENT DOWN" posts.
 

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Originally posted by Jon T. Flesh:
Good post Pulse, will be going to the FAQ

Although I would like to add...

GSXR600 is not a good learner bike


Anyone looking to start riding should not ride any type R bike, big ass Hardley, or anything above 600cc's.
That being said some good learner bikes are:
Buell Blast
Kawisaki EX500
Kawisaki EX250
Honda Nighthawk 250
Honda Rebel 250 (I rode for 2 years happily)
Suzuki Bandit 600
Suzuki GS500
Suzuki SV650

Sportbikes require alot of respect. Now that doesn't mean that no one has started on a sportbike and ended up fine but if you want to learn the correct way, and the fun way go cheap and go used. Learn what a more standard bike can do. There is plenty of time to build from there.
I have said this many times. Everybody drops thier bike while learning. Not crash but drop. Slow turns, manuvering the bike in a garage are all big time places where this happens. Sportbikes have so much easily breakable plastic parts that are very pricey to even mess with.

Buy one of those bikes used. Even the 250 is a good bike for people 150lbs or less. I personally have rode with a couple guys on EX250's that would smoke alot of riders in the twisties. Learn what you can on that more forgiving bike. Sell it after a year for close to what you payed and get whatever you want


jontflesh
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">John-

Ill add another bike. Im still on my first bike, a Ninja ZX-6. Its not the 6R. I feel the zx-6 is a good bike to learn because it doesnt jump right away but can keep up(for the most part). I know its a kawi but hell its still a bike adn its better than not riding at all.
 

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For all of the above


May i suggest a restriction on what bikes learners can ride in their first yr [Like what other countries have] ? Based on power - weight ratio.


KaTz

[ 04-11-2002, 04:18 PM: Message edited by: Jon T. Flesh ]
 

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May i suggest a restriction on what bikes learners can ride in their first yr [Like what other countries have] ? Based on power - weight ratio.
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Katz, They will bringing this law in to Victoria very soon. I have a friend who works at a car dealership and they got a fax saying that thee will be a 500cc limit, not to sure on the power to weight tho. I'm guessing that it wil rule out RGV's and CBR 250's.

Typhon
 
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