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Taught Goatsee everything he "knows"
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Discussion Starter #1
Im still a gun noob here but have a question about recoil. It affects the accuracy of my aim a bit when shooting as the gun jumps up slightly.

Is there a way to hold the gun to reduce recoil, ex: arms bent or arms straight? Or would you just aim a little lower than intended to compensate for the upwards movement.

Another question. Up to how many feet are handguns accurate?
 

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The bullet leaves the barrel before your rifle moves. Are you sure your not flinching or anticipating recoil? I know that is something I had trouble with when I first started.
 

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Taught Goatsee everything he "knows"
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Discussion Starter #3
Im shooting a handgun. Dont they recoil too or am I using the wrong term to describe the slight kick when it fires. :scratch
 

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Every firearm recoils. Its still the same principal though. The bullet is gone before the muzzle rises. There are different pistol shooting stances but I prefer the isosceles stance. Try different stances until you find one that works for you. If you can find a NRA pistol coarse near you. Proper instruction in invaluable, especially before you form bad habits. I had some I had to break.

Accuracy depends on caliber and barrel length.
 

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Taught Goatsee everything he "knows"
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Discussion Starter #6
Accuracy depends on caliber and barrel length.
I know that, just wondering whats the general range for a handgun. I should of been more specific. Curious about the range in accuracy for most 9mm handguns that are avarage fullsize.

I have a M9 and I was shooting up to 40ft at the range.

Use this to get a sense of what your doing wrong. Its for right hand shooters, if your left just let me know.

http://www.reloadbench.com/pdf/files/TargetRightHanded.pdf
Thanks. Pretty useful. :biggrin Like the chart.

Most of the shooting advice I know is from friends who shoot regularly. But like you said the best thing for me to do is take a course to avoid any bad habits.
 

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Wow you truely are new to guns. Try installing a ported barrel to reduce the amount the barrel rises
 

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I move away from the mic
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40 ft is about 13 yards.

During handgun qualifications, we shot at the furthest was 25 yards. Shooting at standard body silhouette targets. Had to have all rounds in the center mass (5 Point area).



Trigger pull is very important, as well as breathing and sight picture.
 

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Handgun accuracy is controlled by two factors. Sight alignment and trigger squeeze. As long as the sights are properly aligned and you're smoothly squeezing the trigger the shots will be quite accurate. Make sure you're only moving the trigger finger when squeezing the trigger.

Your focus should be on the front sight, NOT the target. The target doesn't aim the gun, the sights do.

When squeezing the trigger make sure you squuuuuueeeeeeeeezzzzzzzzzzzeeeeeeeeee. Don't start with a squeeze and mash the trigger just before it breaks. Shots low and left toward 7 o'clock are indicative of jerking the trigger if you're right handed. They're low and right if you're left handed.

Recoil is controlled through proper grip. The pressure to hold the gun should be on the front strap of the grip. If your fingertips are white you're holding too tight which makes squeezing with only the trigger finger difficult.

Take a look at this video http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4584332856867071363#

You'll find proper grip easily when the sights are naturally aligned 95% of the way when the gun is presented to the target.

Taking a high grip with the shooting thumb riding over the support thumb will also help control recoil.


By taking a high grip the bore axis is more inline with the wrist. This helps keep the muzzle down. Try taking a shot with a low grip. You'll notice much more muzzle flip than when taking a high grip. A high grip means the hand is as high as it can go without getting slide bite. The support hand will need to be canted down to near full lock of the wrist but not actually locked. The support hand thumb can sit slightly off the frame of the handgun near the slide release. You don't want to put pressure on the frame or you may prevent the slide release from locking the slide back when the magazine is empty.

If you're shooting a revolver don't place the support hand thumb near the cylinder or you can seriously hurt yourself. The above grip is used for semi-autos.

Don't lock your elbows but get a good extension. The elbows should be slightly bent so that they will act as shock absorbers.

Practice good follow through. Don't immediately look at the target to see where you hit. After the shot breaks and the gun recoils you should be back in your shooting position and be able to easily pick up the front sight when you're doing things properly.

Building your forearm and chest will also help in recoil control. If you look at a number of the good shooters you'll see they tend to have well built forearms. Use grip strength trainers and dumbbell curls to build your forearms.

When I was on the pistol team in college we'd always end training sessions by doing a few reps with one of these jigs. I don't think it's a coincidence the best shooters could do the most reps.


I occasionally teach the pistol marksmanship class at the U of U. Let me know if you have any more questions. I'm always happy to help fellow shooters.
 

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Taught Goatsee everything he "knows"
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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks. Very informative. I appreciate the advice. :D

Oh and good video. I looked at a few earlier but none as helpful as that.
 

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Great post.

Most critical part of it is, don't lock your wrists/elbows. A looser approach is better when learning to shoot.

No need to compensate for recoil; if you have proper trigger control, that problem will solve itself. ALWAYS aim your gun at exactly the same point on the target. You're looking for smaller groups which should gather up at about the same small area on the target. If you consistently get good groups and they are consistently in the same area then MAYBE you can have the sights moved a bit.

Pretty simple, really, but I'm betting you are either anticipating or flinching. I train people to get past either of those problems by using a revolver. I put an empty, two hot, two empty and a hot into the cylinder, close it and spin it and if you the gun moves before pulling the trigger on the dead rounds, you're anticipating/flinching.

Once you know, you can train it out of yourself.

Keep us posted.

--Wag--
 

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Just call me "nubs"
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Great post.

Most critical part of it is, don't lock your wrists/elbows. A looser approach is better when learning to shoot.

No need to compensate for recoil; if you have proper trigger control, that problem will solve itself. ALWAYS aim your gun at exactly the same point on the target. You're looking for smaller groups which should gather up at about the same small area on the target. If you consistently get good groups and they are consistently in the same area then MAYBE you can have the sights moved a bit.

Pretty simple, really, but I'm betting you are either anticipating or flinching. I train people to get past either of those problems by using a revolver. I put an empty, two hot, two empty and a hot into the cylinder, close it and spin it and if you the gun moves before pulling the trigger on the dead rounds, you're anticipating/flinching.

Once you know, you can train it out of yourself.

Keep us posted.

--Wag--
All of the above are great. 95% of people anticipate/jerk while beginning shooting. We spent an entire day with a buddy loading dummy rounds into our magazine and switching off shooting until there was no more anticipation. Sight alignment, trigger control. Sight alignment, trigger control. Sight alignment, trigger control.

Although it isn't an amazing feat, I can land consistent shots on an 11" plate at 50 yds. with my .45 xd.
 
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