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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading some post yesterday I realized that there were tons of new guys without any real cornering experience. So I thought I would mention some things to help some of the newbies in the right direction and maybe, just maybe, make the ride safer and more enjoyable. I am no expert but I have learned for myself some of the pitfalls of cornering the 1K.

Please Feel free to make any comments or suggestions.

First off I recommend you buy yourself a book. Keith Codes "Twist of the Wrist II". This is very informational about how you need to take a corner and will help you overcome some of the Survival Mechanisms that will put you on the ground.

Cornering: One of the things that is tought in racing schools is to start rolling the throttle on as you are coming through the apex of a corner. With the GSXR1000 this is not recommended. The problem with rolling the throttle on mid corner is the surge of power you get when you crack open the throttle. When you get the surge you may spin the rear wheel leading to a high side or low side depending on how hard you give it gas. I have found from my personal experience that it is better to brake up into the corner and crack the throttle open as I am starting my line. This puts the majority of the weight on the rear tire(where it should be) and you just continue to roll it on as you go through the corner. This way you don't have your weight distribution changing mid corner either.

Now where should your rpm's be? I personally like to go into a corner around 9000 rpms and come out just about to bounce off the rev limiter. This is really hot for a lot of guys and really helps your exit speed. So for the new rider I do not recommend this.

Try taking the same corner over and over and just holding your speed and line untill you are comfortable. Then start practicing increasing the throttle as you go through it. But stay in the less torque lower rpm's as you begin. Work your way up to taking a corner in the Power Band. The GSXR1000 is the king, but she is also the king of the dreaded Highside.

Braking. Get off that rear brake untill you learn how to trail brake. The only time you should use that rear brake is when your in the grass. I watched a 40mph lowside about a month ago and tried to figure out what the guy did because he was not going to hot. New Bike rider, and he had taken the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Course. In the course they told him to use both brakes evenly. This may work on your daddy's cruiser but on a sports bike that just locks up the rear and starts it sliding. Then I checked his front forks and realized he was not set up right. When he would hit the brakes he was maxing out the front shocks putting all his weight on the front. When he applied the rear brake it just slid out from under him.

Suspension: Make sure your suspension is set up for you. Not all of us can go out and buy a Penske Triple and have the front forks revalved. It's expensive. If you do not know how to set your sag, static sag, compression, and rebound then take it to your local suspension expert. They are easy to find if you just call your local racing organization. Having your suspension set up correctly can be the difference between life and death. It makes me furious that we give the dealerships all this money and they won't take the time of day to set it up for the individual rider.

Tires: Ride what works for you. Everyone is different, but the GSXR1000 comes with Bridgestone which are my least favorite because they slide so much. I don't like Michelins because they give no warning before they let go, and really let go when the do. I prefer Dunlop GP tires for hard cornering because they will tell you when you are getting to far over, and give you a good warning before they let go.
The main thing is have the right tires for you, and have the right tire for the kind of riding you are going to be doing.

Chain: Keep your chain with a little more sag than factory recommendation for really aggressive cornering, if your chain is to tight your rear shock is worthless.

Body Position: Get your weight out of the seat and on the pegs, this makes it easier to adjust side to side and forwards and backwards through the turns. Don't choke handle bars. If your arms are getting tired from supporting your weight you are leaning on them with too much weight.

Motorcycle safety foundation will get you your liscense, but a track day with instructors will get you cornering the right way, for the track as well as the streets.

As I said I am no expert but I have had to learn how to handle the 1K on the track. She is a beast, learn to handle how she works gradually, slowly. You won't learn anything from the ground except the fact you would rather be riding.
 

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nice tips will take that into concideration when i start riding my gs500!! but before that quick question so are you saying it isnt good to brake at all during a corner?? (front or back) say you come in alittle to hot? should you just ease of the throttle or what?? also when i get my gs500 i plan on doing as many track days as i can before i upgrade hopefully i will get the hang of good cornering
 

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Braking. Get off that rear brake untill you learn how to trail brake. The only time you should use that rear brake is when your in the grass.
I don't do it but everything I have ever read says you trail brake using the front brake..not the rear
 

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sorry iam such a newbie what is trail braking? you mean easing the front brakes on lilttle by little or em i way off? so basically like a car you dotn hit the back brake if you come into a corner to fast...you just ease on the front one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I too will find myself going into a corner pretty hot and keep that front brake compressed further than I should. It's what Dropped Nicky Hayden last week.

Tapping the brakes in a corner will stand you straight up and you are heading for the grass as soon as it happens.
 

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Braking. Get off that rear brake untill you learn how to trail brake. The only time you should use that rear brake is when your in the grass.
I don't do it but everything I have ever read says you trail brake using the front brake..not the rear
That's a good way to accidently knife your front end in.
 

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sorry iam such a newbie what is trail braking? you mean easing the front brakes on lilttle by little or em i way off? so basically like a car you dotn hit the back brake if you come into a corner to fast...you just ease on the front one.
so then was i right, should i just ease the front brake in? or not touch any brake after initial braking into the corner? also i still em lost to what trail braking is?
 

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Braking. Get off that rear brake untill you learn how to trail brake. The only time you should use that rear brake is when your in the grass.
I don't do it but everything I have ever read says you trail brake using the front brake..not the rear
That's a good way to accidently knife your front end in.
What does that mean exactly...to "knife your front end in" Are you saying that is NOT how to trail brake?

still em lost to what trail braking is
It is the use of the front brake to bleed off speed and compress the front suspension well past the turn entry point. It allows you to do two things; brake later and alter the rake and trail of the bike to make the bike turn quicker.

The downside is you are taking away some of your traction for turning for use in braking. Could get ugly quick.
 

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Brake right up until you turn the bike in and only trail the brakes slightly if you really have to, but usually if you need to brake into the corner you'd be better off not doing it. Leave that for pros. And on the street, try to ride the pace - that is, without any braking at all.
 

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this is my first 1k and its an 05 i have been taking the turns nice and easy... i need to get down and lean more i want to but scared to i only have about 200 miles so give me about another 200 and i should be fine but u gave me some great info
 

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Trail braking means braking after you turn the bike (i.e. while it is leaned over). Period.

Braking while leaned over makes the bike want to run wide, so if you're already at the lean angle you need, there's no point in it. You will reduce your likelihood of losing the front end if you begin rolling the throttle on and roll it on smoothly, steadily and consistently throughout the turn. (see Twist of the Wrist II, as mentioned above)

If you need to increase your lean angle to complete the turn, and you're going too fast for the needed lean angle, then your only option is to roll off the throttle and even use some brakes if you have to to get your speed down, then turn the bike again (i.e. lean it further) and start to roll on the throttle.

Your bike has maximum traction when it has roughly a 40/60 weight distribution (front/rear). Look at the sizes of your tires if this is unclear. The ONLY way to get that is to be rolling on the throttle. At a steady speed (i.e. not accelerating), you'll have a roughly 50/50 weight distribution - which means your front is much closer to sliding than your rear is. If you're slowing, it will be worse - anywhere from 60/40 to 100/0, if you're really hard on the brakes. So, if you're already leaned over as far as you need to go and you're NOT rolling on the throttle, you can only improve your situation (i.e. reduce the chance of a slide) by rolling it on.

If you do use some brakes, which one you use is up to you. I never use my rear brake when I'm on a race track. I have much better control of my front brakes, so that is what I use if I have to brake while leaned over.
 

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Your bike has maximum traction when it has roughly a 40/60 weight distribution (front/rear). Look at the sizes of your tires if this is unclear. The ONLY way to get that is to be rolling on the throttle. At a steady speed (i.e. not accelerating), you'll have a roughly 50/50 weight distribution - which means your front is much closer to sliding than your rear is. If you're slowing, it will be worse - anywhere from 60/40 to 100/0, if you're really hard on the brakes. So, if you're already leaned over as far as you need to go and you're NOT rolling on the throttle, you can only improve your situation (i.e. reduce the chance of a slide) by rolling it on.
 
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