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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got an 88750J that's had more riders than Wilt and been down more than Lewinski. I'm putting new tires, brakes, fork seals, plugs, and need to do the chain sprockets also. I think Chapparel says a 520-108 for my year&make. I looked at the rear sprocket and it's stamped 48.

Question: Is there a typical upgrade to get for this type of bike? or do I go back with stock size parts? I ride for fun, not race, and have limited funds, baby on the way. I don't ride over 120, and hitting 100 is somewhat rare. I wouldn't mind going with a setup that gets me to 100 quicker than a guy who can go 140, cause he'll be doing that alone. follow?

Anybody's 2cents welcome.

P.S. Should I get my fork seals through Chapp. or dealer? Chilton doesn't list the size, and the Chapp. catalog only has size listings. My factory manual is due in here shortly so I guess that will have to wait for the figures I need to order new ones.

Unrelated question: coasting down from 60ish, I'll take my hands off the bike and re-adjust my gloves, jacket, whatever, and after two-four seconds, my front end will start to wobble, and if I let it go another 2sec or so, It'll be almost bad enough to pitch me off. Is that normal for a 13yr old bike? or do I have axle, wheel, brace problems? is it time for a damper?

Thanks in advance.

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I'm not sure what your stock sprocket is but most people will agree that going up no more then 3 teeth on the rear sprocket is plenty. I've heard people say they've gone up 5 but that's probably a little extreme. I went up three teeth from stock on my 86 Gix 750 and was pleased with the results- like you, I don't use the top end much so low end performance was way more important to me.

As for your wobble when coasting- that is not normal. My 86 is smooth as silk if I take my hands off to coast at the same speed. First thing I'd check is the balance on your front wheel. I get a slight high speed wobble at around 130 MPH+ but am so rarely at that speed I have not invested in a dampener as of yet.

I'd check www.bikebandit.com for prices on your fork seals.

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Youth and talent are no match for age and treachery!

[This message has been edited by Talisian (edited 03-27-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've got two MEZ3's waiting to go on the bike, but I'm trying to get many other issues address while I have the bike apart. Want to get it done, warm weather around the corner, but I also want to do things right. I'm building my own rear stand and will make a frame stand also, so I can take both rims off and save 40-50 bucks on tire install by taking them off the bike. I hope they don't find out I have a bent rim, hopefully they can re-balance the wheel(s) when they put the new tires on.

If the front is bent, that will complicate my dilima with painting or dipping the white rear wheel. Front is chrome already.

I'll find out the factory sprocket spec on # of teeth, and go up 3. I will assume to replace the front gear with an O.E. spec one. And use the chain they spec for my bike also.

Anyone like a particular brand chain/sprocket?? Rethral, DID,.....

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Just what I would do with that bike
...two up in bak one down in front 520 o-ring chain, and get dunlop 205-207's
I run 207's on my 9211thing and they are great tires. lisdten to jeff check front tire and rim a wobble can get worse and kill you

KJ1

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll get the wheels checked before I blast and paint them, to see if I need a new rim. I hope the factory service manual I ordered will walk me through the steps to check the axles and whatever else I can check to track down that wobble. With the bike apart for brake pads, sprockets, chains, I want to make sure I put it all back together correctly and without re-using bad parts.

I'm sure I'll be burning up this room with more stupid questions before I get it all together and ready for some summer running.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm planning on following my new factory service manual in the installation of new fork seals. I hope that manual can help me determine if the actual fork is bent. Don't need that expense. The bikes been down time and again. I low sided it on my test drive!!
Bent forks entirely possible, will check the forks and rim when I start the tear down.

I've yet to hear any product endorsements other than pro-tek. I read somewhere, someone likes DID chains....

Don't care much if chain/sprockets are any particular color, I just want good working poducts with a good lifetime. Price does matter!

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you don't need the manual to see if the forks are bent, just eye the forks at where the fork tube (shiny part that's bolted to the triple clamps) and the slider (the lower part that holds the wheel and brakes) meet. they should not be at an angle to each other, they should be completely straight all the way up and down. if they're at an angle, then the fork tubes are bent and need to be replaced.


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Jeff, how the heck can you see bent forks in the picture? I'm missing something I know

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We are men of action, lies do not become us. Are there rocks ahead? If there are, we'll all be dead.
 

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the fork tube seems to be at a slight angle to the slider, instead of being in a straight line. but then again, it could be a trick of the lighting (the reflection off the fork tube might make it look like it's at a different angle).


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I see said the blind man. I was looking low and not comparing to the top.

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We are men of action, lies do not become us. Are there rocks ahead? If there are, we'll all be dead.
 

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yeah, in an impact, the fork tube on a conventional fork will almost always bend first, cuz the lower part is cast aluminum and a lot stiffer than the tube which is thin walled steel (i believe). once they're bent, they should be replaced, although you might be tempted to have them straightened. it's kinda like the 'patching a tire' argument - straightening the tubes might be cheaper than completely replacing them, but i don't think the savings is worth my life.

on the other hand, upside down forks are so stiff that in a hard head-on impact, instead of absorbing the impact by bending, the forks usually rip the steering head right out of the frame.


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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thanks for all advice! I've got my parts list together and will order my stuff today, Friday. All I need now is time.

I'm selling my house within the next couple of weeks and will be putting an offer an the next one, and that will be top project. Since my spawn is on the way, I'll have to get the nest thing goin.

Possible new place has no garage, not that the shack I got now is anything. So I'll have to be creative with my bike tear-down. Weather man says 65 Sat, Sun. Damn! bald tire with belts showing, and two new tires sitting next to my bike!!

Better to get the tires done when I do the chain/sprocket, brake pads, fork seals (possible new forks?!?!)

Hey I got a new question concerning forks!

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