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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed that my tires are turning blue. I did one track day on them in the fall. I am just noticing that they are blue now. It has been 4 months. My garage is heated. They are michelin power rs manufactured in week 39 of 2016 which is kinda old in my opinion but may have nothing to do with this. Im a little worried seeing the manufacture date now. I did buy these from a reputable online company. I just assumed they would be newer. Anyway... any opinions on this? I would like to hear them. Why are they blue? Should i not use them?
 

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Chubby Chaser
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Tyre Discolouration – Blue Tyres
Motorcycle Blue Tyres

You often see the question come up ‘why are my tyres blue’ or ‘what’s this blue stuff on my tyres’ with people suggesting that when you see it the tyres are done. This isn’t completely true.

What makes it blue? – Motorcycle tyres actually contain oils that keep the tyre soft and the blue/green tint you can see on your tyres is just the oils coming to the surface.

Why are they on the surface? – After the tyres have been used to the point where they gain significant heat, when they cool down again (this is one heat cycle) the oils in the tyre will often come to the surface. When you go back out and ride the bike these surface oils are scrubbed off and it’s only when you come back in and let the tyres cool down again that you’ll see more oils coming to the surface.

Each time you take a tyre through a heat cycle you are losing the oils that keep the tyre soft, so the more heat cycles a tyre has been through the less effective the rubber is going to be for you.

As a side note, heat cycles will affect track tyres a lot worse than road biased tyres, as road tyres are expected to go through these cycles.
 

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Chubby Chaser
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As an aside....I don't know if you intentionally flipped your front tire around to get more mileage because the track you ride on wears one side far more severely than the other......but having said that, your front tire is mounted backwards FYI ;)

The tread on your front and rear tires generally speaking run in opposition directions to one another. The tread is only there for water dispersion in the wet. If you only ever ride in the dry it should be of no concern.


Correct orientation for front and rear

 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for that explanation. I guess i was surprised to see the blue after one track day just because i havent seen it on my own bike before. I have read about the oils coming out if the tire before. I’ll have to read up on it again. No my tire is not on backwards, must be hard to see the spoke in the picture.
 

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Chubby Chaser
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Ahh OK. Didn't realize the wheel wasn't actually mounted on the bike in the picture. When I saw no fork and caliper in the frame I assumed I was looking at the leading edge of the bike :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ahh OK. Didn't realize the wheel wasn't actually mounted on the bike in the picture. When I saw no fork and caliper in the frame I assumed I was looking at the leading edge of the bike
Haha. I can see tgat now!

So if the oils are coming to the suface- is the tire getting harder?
 

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Chubby Chaser
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Haha. I can see tgat now!

So if the oils are coming to the suface- is the tire getting harder?

Technically everytime a race tire goes through a heat cycle it is becoming a bit harder and losing some level of grip. As the excerpt up there states, street tires are meant to withstand far more heat cycles than a race tire is (admittedly I'm not sure what Michelin Power RS's are classified as). That's part of the reason why people use tire warmers at the track with race tires. You start the day off with the warmers on to bring the tires up to temp and then every time you come off track you throw them back on to keep the tires warm. If done properly your race tires would only go through 1 heat cycle the entire day, rather than potentially 7-8 of them which will extend their use lifespan. If they're street/sport tires its less of an issue. I have Dunlop race slicks on my 600, but I did a random trackday with my 1000 that has Dunlop Q3+ tires on it. I didn't use any warmers and you could see some of that blue'ing a couple days afterwards. I've ridden it several times on the street since then, no worries. But again, they are technically street rubber and designed to handle many heat cycles.

I have no idea what your speed/skillset is so I can guesstimate how much you are actually working the tires and when/if you can sense when their grip is starting to go off. My guess through is that you can likely still get a decent amount of use from them still since they don't look worn at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am going to use the tires for at least another 2 days. This season I have tire warmers. Last season I went through 2 sets of tires and this was the 3rd set. My friend has the same tires and he uses tire warmers just so he doesn't need to warm them up for 2 laps. I guess for me it's not really going to be a heat cycle issue as much as I just want to get the most of my track time. I recently signed up for Dave Moss's website. He has a lot of good information on bike setups and tires. One video showed a guy with tires doing what mine are doing and Dave told him they are fine.
 
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