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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so I understand when you change down a gear (at constant speed) your RPM needs to go up. If you match the new revs when you engage the gear you it's going to be smoother, and will avoided sudden engine braking and/or the rear wheel locking (slipper clutch helps with this).

But, my question is why do some riders blip the throttle when changing down rather just matching the RPM? When I say blip I mean the revs rise above the revs you need for the new gear and then fall back down as you engage the next gear. Personally I just tend to keep the throttle constant when downshifting which seems about right to match.
 

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Okay, so I understand when you change down a gear (at constant speed) your RPM needs to go up. If you match the new revs when you engage the gear you it's going to be smoother, and will avoided sudden engine braking and/or the rear wheel locking (slipper clutch helps with this).

But, my question is why do some riders blip the throttle when changing down rather just matching the RPM? When I say blip I mean the revs rise above the revs you need for the new gear and then fall back down as you engage the next gear. Personally I just tend to keep the throttle constant when downshifting which seems about right to match.
When I downshift I blip the throttle. I have been practicing that since day 1. Makes downshifting feel smooth atleast.
 

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Captain Obvious ... because obviously it’s obvious
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Because either way works, and it just depends on the bike. If you remove the load from the engine while holding the throttle at the same position, the throttle may spike up or it may not rise fast enough to reach the RPM level you want. It is entirely dependent on the engine characteristics and what kind of clutch it is.
 

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I've been practicing for years ever since I bought my GSXR1000 K2 brand new 16 years ago, still riding the same bike today...

Took a fair while to master it, but now is completely second nature, don't even have to think about, just do it with zero thought required...

My theory is... you want to change down gear as quickly as possible without wasting time...

As I'm pulling the clutch in (same time) I give the throttle a quick blip, always the same amount, no more no less, by the time the clutch is fully into the bar, I've down changed...

I don't look at the tacho trying to match rpm points, completely zero time to do that, I'm looking at the corner ahead.

When I first started practicing, I was looking at the tacho a lot working out what the best amount of blip was required, once I worked that out, I memorized the sound the engine made on the blip, and blip the throttle the same amount ever time from the engine noise, and now do the whole procedure, with zero thought, and without looking at the tacho what so ever...

Changes down gears super smoothly... Most importantly IMO as fast as possible...
 

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Okay, so I understand when you change down a gear (at constant speed) your RPM needs to go up. If you match the new revs when you engage the gear you it's going to be smoother, and will avoided sudden engine braking and/or the rear wheel locking (slipper clutch helps with this).

But, my question is why do some riders blip the throttle when changing down rather just matching the RPM? When I say blip I mean the revs rise above the revs you need for the new gear and then fall back down as you engage the next gear. Personally I just tend to keep the throttle constant when downshifting which seems about right to match.
iif they're over revving it.. they're doing just that over revving.. aka doing it wrong.



blipping imo is for lazy downshifts.. any kind of fun riding is usually clutchless downs.. or going down a couple gears and sliding around.
 

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I know things... A lot of things.
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But, my question is why do some riders blip the throttle when changing down rather just matching the RPM? When I say blip I mean the revs rise above the revs you need for the new gear and then fall back down as you engage the next gear. Personally I just tend to keep the throttle constant when downshifting which seems about right to match.
If you mean that you just pull the clutch without changing the throttle at all while downshifting, I could only imagine that to work when you're accelerating mildly at the time of the shift. If you're (engine-)braking before the shift, the engine speed will fall once the clutch is pulled and, conversely, it will shoot up if you're accelerating substantially. In any case, if the result is a smooth shift, with minimal variation in deceleration/acceleration and hence tire load and chassis attitude and if it doesn't take too much attention to perform, any technique will do, I suppose.
 

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Dreaming of buttsecks for years...
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If you blip right, you are rev matching. If you don't do it right, you're at least closer than what you'd be if you didn't. Both are much, much faster than trying to do a rev match.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you mean that you just pull the clutch without changing the throttle at all while downshifting, I could only imagine that to work when you're accelerating mildly at the time of the shift. If you're (engine-)braking before the shift, the engine speed will fall once the clutch is pulled and, conversely, it will shoot up if you're accelerating substantially. In any case, if the result is a smooth shift, with minimal variation in deceleration/acceleration and hence tire load and chassis attitude and if it doesn't take too much attention to perform, any technique will do, I suppose.
No, I really mean adjust the throttle to the point where you would maintain a constant speed and then shift while holding it in that throttle position.

Reading the other posts it sounds like people agree with me, you are aiming to match the revs and not over-shoot by a massive amount.
 

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No, I really mean adjust the throttle to the point where you would maintain a constant speed and then shift while holding it in that throttle position.

Reading the other posts it sounds like people agree with me, you are aiming to match the revs and not over-shoot by a massive amount.
I misunderstood then. The aim is indeed to match the speeds of the two shafts in the gearbox, but, although an exact match is welcome, it is not indispensable, since you still use the clutch to synchronize the shafts. The aim is to have the wheel speed and engine speed matching close enough, so that no significant acceleration change (and hence wheel load and chassis pitch variation) takes place during the shift. If you can match accurately without loosing too much time and concentration, that would be ideal, but(, and regarding your initial question), my understanding also is that blipping is used as a technique that gets you close enough, without taking too much time or thought.
 

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That’s Mister Chalet To You ....
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Nothing wrong with a little engine music but personally, I just do a slight blip, enough to permit a smooth downshift. Nice & quiet-like.

Then there are those who do it so much that they sound like they're part of a moto GP starting grid.... as both of us ride at the same speed between the same two stop signs :facepalm
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Nothing wrong with a little engine music but personally, I just do a slight blip, enough to permit a smooth downshift. Nice & quiet-like.

Then there are those who do it so much that they sound like they're part of a moto GP starting grid.... as both of us ride at the same speed between the same two stop signs :facepalm
Yeh, those are the ones I was talking about, I was wondering if they are just trying to show off - sounds like they are.
 

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Keep it Simple... Why over complicate it so much...

For example only..... Say you accelerate up to 9000RPM, you then change up to the next gear, clutch out and accelerate away, the revs will drop (for example only) to 7500 RPM once the next gear is engaged.

The difference between the two gears at the same road speed is.... 1500RPM...

So.... "The Perfect Amount of Throttle Blip Required" (or Rev Match identical concept) changing down from the higher gear to the lower gear is exactly 1500RPM, anywhere in the rev range... Simple As That......


Works exactly the same way if you either....

#1. Come screaming up to a corner, hard on the brakes, throttle closed de-accelerating, and blipping the throttle only for each down change of gear as quickly as possible...

#2. Your cruising on the road at a constant (80kmh / 50mph), you want to change down a gear to pass a car. So once again (for example), your at a constant 4500RPM, ( you know the difference between 2 gears is 1500RPM), so a quick throttle blip of 1500RPM up to approx 6000RPM while pulling the clutch and select the gear, the gear will fall in super easy, as the gear speeds are perfectly matched, clutch out, accelerate away from 6000RPM and pass the car....

Weather your fanging around on the track or cruising along on the street at a constant speed, a quick fast down gear change with throttle blip, is the most efficient method...

Clutch plates are far easier to replace... than worn dog teeth and bent shift forks from lazy sloppy gear changes, from just crunching/smashing it into every gear...

As I said previously, with lots of practice it'll become second nature, you can do it solely from hearing the amount of engine noise of the "Perfect Blip", you'll do it without even thinking about, and no need to look at the tacho whatsoever...


Obviously all of these RPM figures are just made up for this example... YOU'LL have to work out the best amount of RPM Throttle Blip required for YOUR OWN BIKE... memorize it with lots of practice, Then forget about it... as it will become completely second nature to your brain...
 

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I gotta say, oh, never mind LOL
'
WTF is wrong with me? I just totally shut down a totally real sarcastic statement regarding the first 3 posters on this thread
:bitchslap

Must be maturing
:wink2:

The whole reason, depending on where you're riding, street or track, the reasons differ slightly. On the street, you are doing it to make your ride smoother, and minimize the shock to the drivetrain, also minimizing wear, and for the squids, it sounds cool. On the race track, it's to not upset the chassis while braking for the turn, and save precious time. Practice makes perfect.
 

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Must be maturing
:wink2:

The whole reason, depending on where you're riding, street or track, the reasons differ slightly. On the street, you are doing it to make your ride smoother, and minimize the shock to the drivetrain, also minimizing wear, and for the squids, it sounds cool. On the race track, it's to not upset the chassis while braking for the turn, and save precious time. Practice makes perfect.
Makes Completely Zero Difference....... No Matter where the bike is, the Street or the Track, all the advantages of Blipping the Throttle On Downshift apply Equally, in all Situations....

On the Track, I sill want to "ride smoother, and minimize the shock to the drivetrain, also minimizing wear", and "it sounds cool", just as much as it does on the Track...

On the Street, I still don't want to "upset the chassis while braking for the turn" and want to "save precious time" changing gears, just as much as it does on the Street...


It work's Just As Efficiently and Effectively... Anywhere......
 

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My downshift blips are still pretty shit but the reality is that I get it close enough 99% of the time which is infinitely better than just shifting gears and letting out the clutch. Works better if I am higher RPMs too
 
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