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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to re-paint my bike this winter but there are certain things I wanted to do or have to do:
1. I have to paint the bike with rattle cans because I do not have the money to pay for someone else to do it.
2. I wanted to do a blue and white scheme (would like to keep it simple)

So my question is the blue that is on the 2006 gixxer that is on the tank, do you think I could get that in a rattle can or try and get a paint code similar? I have no idea where to start. Also does anyone ideas for a paint scheme? I love blue and white thats why I want to go with something like that. Thanks fellas
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The blue I need is the one on the tank, they are different colors right? From the picture they look different from the fairings and the tail.
 

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Colorite is the only one that has the EXACT paint colors, but it is EXPENSIVE, even for the rattle cans.

Duplicolor (get it at walmart and at auto parts stores) is pretty good stuff if you TAKE YOUR TIME. It is a metalic paint and looks good IMO. The Clearcoat spraypaint is a bitch to apply IMO though.
 

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Oh, and their blue is a pretty good looking blue. CHeck out Mikeinwi's bike and mine, same color. Check around in the 06 forums
 

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there are a few guys that have used the rattle cans and it turned out to be very nice. take your time and don't rush it though.
 

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The ONLY rattle can paint you should use is Krylon Fusion.
You probably still need to use a filler primer under it.
Still need several packs of wet sandpaper, painters tape, wire hangers to hang the parts, thinner. You need to stay away from grits coarser than 320 unless you are removing some BAD scrape damage. A couple of buckets wouldn't hurt you don't want to rinse the wet paper of one grit into the same bucket you'll be rinsing a finer paper -chance of picking up coarser grit on the fine paper-. If you don't have a rubber sanding block a sponge should do. You really need to do a good job of clean up between grits, should try to use the same grit on all the pieces at the same time. Clean every thing, canned air -compressed air- in all the crevasses. Although you want to paint everything at the same time you shouldn't have all the pieces in the same room. You'll get overspray 'dust' on the unpainted pieces, conversely, you want to move the painted pieces out of the paint room before painting the next piece. Don't try covering/uncovering pieces in the paint room after you start painting -overspray dust again-. Pick which color you want to be the base and paint it all at the same time -all the pieces, solid blue or white-.
Tape it off after a couple days of drying time you'll probably have to lightly scuff it with 600 or 800 grit, a good wipe down with a tack cloth and compresses air.
Then paint the second color. the fusion paint goes on pretty nice but you will be pressed for time on the tank and larger fairing pieces because you are using spray cans. The overlaps need to be as far apart as you can get with out the individual passes 'drying' before the last pass in the same direction tacks hard. Otherwise you will have a partially rough finish. To give you an Idea:
Fins something about the same size -roughly- as your biggest piece.
Just start painting...do you start in the middle and work out?... nope
Do you start from both ends and work towards the center? ...nope
If at all possible work from one end/side toward the middle then depending on your skill level and continue to the far side. Keep in mind these are rattle cans and you have to get a quick look at the nozzle to prevent drips -wipe it on a shirtsleeve or glove -. You also have to watch out where the back of the can is at so it doesn't touch down on painted areas, and if you are leaning over a painted piece YOU or your clothes can touch down. You also need to get one of those trigger type paint can attachments (about $2.00) so your wrist or finger doesn't numb/cramp up and you try to get in a hurry. It can be done and nicely at that but you need to practice laying the paint. I can use two cans at once which helps but I've had a lot of touch up practice. I did my son's front end on his Porsche 928 and it looks great, I mean it's eyeball close inspectable. However the extreme width and length of the hood kept me from painting with cans . So fenders yes, hood no.
Preparation is where you win or lose on a paint job, NO CLUTTER, all the cans pre shook. Don't worry about Suzuki Blue. just get as close as the Fusion paint will allow same for the white.
Practice, practice, practice with some cheap paint before you do this.
 

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I dont know why he says fusion :scratch

Duplicolor is an automotiv touch up paint and does a GREAT job.

Also all the painters I know say to do the small areas first IE the secondary colors. Paint the small areas and over paint them past where you want them. Then tape off that area and paint the rest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok, so this leads me to a few questions.

1st: After I pull the plastics off, what kind of grit should I use to get the paint off? I know deadgarage said to not go any lower than 320 grit unless taking out major scratches (which I due have a few fairings that will need that), what paper should I be using? When I say scratches I am saying not really deep, I dropped the bike from a standstill and bs like that.

2nd: When I use the body filler to start to fill in the scratches, I will start light and stay light on apply so I don't lose the lines on the fairing? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
tulsagsxr said:
Dude if your not sure what your doing I would recommend leting a pro do it.
I am putting together a '72 Challenger right now, I know what I am doing. For example removing paint from the challenger was by using chemical stripper compared to here where you can't use that because of the plastic. So if I ask questions there is a reason why I do that, I want to learn.
 
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ambitions2o said:
I am putting together a '72 Challenger right now, I know what I am doing. For example removing paint from the challenger was by using chemical stripper compared to here where you can't use that because of the plastic. So if I ask questions there is a reason why I do that, I want to learn.
and keep asking....dont listen to the people that will give you shit, and try and figure out the good advice from the bad. Unfortunately I cannot help you any when it comes to paint prep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Chillywater said:
I really like blue/white gixxers, but if i were to re-paint my bike a b/w type colour scheme i think it'd look bad ass to do a Telefonica Movistar type job, that way you get the blue and white look, but its not so common:cheers
Yeah I love the blue and white scheme. I have a '94 Gixxer so I am trying to figure out how I wanted to do it. I wanted to keep it simple though and in the Telefonica job I would not be able to do the checkered flag. I was actually thinking of doing the bike blue and on the tail doing it like the white boxes like a track bike? You get what I'm saying?

Anyone have any other ideas, I am liking the responses. What paper should I start with to take the paint off? 320 and then maybe get 280 to work the scratches out?

wvlax21 said:
and keep asking....dont listen to the people that will give you shit, and try and figure out the good advice from the bad. Unfortunately I cannot help you any when it comes to paint prep.

Thanks, I figure I gotta learn some how why not on my first bike
 
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ambitions2o said:
What paper should I start with to take the paint off? 320 and then maybe get 280 to work the scratches out?
First, no need to remove old paint- you simply need to scuff the existing paint to provide a surface for the new to adhere to. Clean everything with a light degreaser such as denatured alcohol after you have scuffed the surface. You can spray directly over the paint but a good automotive primer is probably a better option. Stay away from the "filler/primers" though. IMO they are a waste of money- better to apply several thin coats of a good primer vs a thick filler primer.

Wipe everything down again with alcohol before you start spraying the paint- you
need to remove any overspray dust.

Also, sandpaper goes the other way- bigger numbers = finer grit. 320 is way too coarse. Start with 500 for the scuff / 800 in between spray coats. Finally, buy some 1500. This is just a bit coarser than most polishes. Wet sand everything after the clearcoat with this. After, buff with a rubbing compund and then ride the hell out of it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Qman said:
First, no need to remove old paint- you simply need to scuff the existing paint to provide a surface for the new to adhere to. Clean everything with a light degreaser such as denatured alcohol after you have scuffed the surface. You can spray directly over the paint but a good automotive primer is probably a better option. Stay away from the "filler/primers" though. IMO they are a waste of money- better to apply several thin coats of a good primer vs a thick filler primer.

Wipe everything down again with alcohol before you start spraying the paint- you
need to remove any overspray dust.

Also, sandpaper goes the other way- bigger numbers = finer grit. 320 is way too coarse. Start with 500 for the scuff / 800 in between spray coats. Finally, buy some 1500. This is just a bit coarser than most polishes. Wet sand everything after the clearcoat with this. After, buff with a rubbing compund and then ride the hell out of it!
The bike has been painted before (I will post pictures later tonight, I have to get them off the camera), so that is why I wonder how much paint is on it. On my Challenger I went down to bare metal and then will DA a little for fresh virgin metal. (This bike thing is a shit-load different than the car thing :biggrin )

I will do the primer step, that does make a difference, but I do have some scratches in the fairings that I want to fix. So I am going to fill them in with body filler.

Next question, on the car you can use a cheese gratter in order knock down the filler, but with the fairings being plastic I am just going to use sandpaper? Also regarding the sandpaper I said 320 because someone said you need to go courser in order to get the scratches out, so thats my bad.
 

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If you're going solid across everything, take all the decals off that you can, take it apart and prep everything but the tank. Take it to a shop and pay them to finish it. They'll get a close enough match to make you happy, and it shouldn't cost that much. Personally, after repainting one fairing.... I'll pay someone to do it next time. PITA!
 
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