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2011 Suzuki GSX-R750 Review

61096 Views 97 Replies 66 Participants Last post by  Insanegixxer750

Does a middleweight sportbike powered by a carbureted, air/oil-cooled engine with a claimed 106 crank horsepower spinning a slim 140 x 70/18 rear tire sound exciting? If it was 1985, and the above mystery bike's color scheme is blue and white, then it was the Suzuki GSX-R750 that would've had you geeked.

A Gixxer 750 with 106 ponies. How times have changed.

The GSX-R750 – arguably the bike that started the replica racer revolution – marked its 25th anniversary in 2010. Oddly, Suzuki decided to celebrate the noteworthy birthday last year by creating a limited edition GSX-R1000, designated by little more than special paint and "25th Anniversary Edition" on the mufflers and wheel rim striping.

For us in the States, 1986 was the first time we could zip down the road on a Gixxer, so this year is something of an unofficial 25th anniversary for the 750 in America. Thankfully, we at least have an upgraded and lighter weight GSX-R750 in 2011 to celebrate with – even if we're the only ones partying.

More: 2011 Suzuki GSX-R750 Review on Motorcycle.com
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My first impression with the newest version of the 750 was more negative than positive. To me, the appearance of the bike was a big downgrade from the previous versions, including my highly modified ’04 750 racebike (also street legal – barely, but still legal).

A few months ago, I was considering trading my Ducati Hypermotard. Since I was testing several bikes, I included the new 750 on the test ride list. I tested all 600 and 750 sportbikes available to me, Japanese, Italian, British...and quickly narrowed the field between the new 750 and Triumph 675R. For what I like in a bike the new GSXR beat all others in every area, including the beautiful Triumph. Although it wasn't the most beautiful bike available, I knew I had to choose the gixxer. The performance was so much better in every way, I knew I would have regrets if I walked away from this bike.

I have recently owned and regularly ridden a lot of great late model bikes, including the Yamaha R1 & R6, Ducati Superbikes, Hypermotard, Kawasaki Z1000, and previous generations of the GSXR 750, so I am a fan of many bikes and manufactures. My riding experience is on twisty mountain roads (Deals Gap, etc..), a bit of commuting and also expert class trackdays on several tracks in the Southeast. I must say, IMO this year model of the 750 is the best package I have owned or ridden as of yet in any of these applications.

Concerning Suzuki sportbikes, it is my opinion/observation, that Suzuki seems to focus their design efforts (and funds) more heavily in areas of performance, rather than asthetics and that their stock setup is tailored more for average street use as compared to other manufacturers. Rake/trail, and ride height as sold is tailored for low seat height and chassis stability and bodywork is acceptable but not outstanding compared to other manufacturers. To me, Suzuki is really good about designing the total package in a way that is easy to modify for racing or dedicated performance riding. Bodywork, suspension, and exhaust parts are often swapped for performance riding on a variety of bikes, but the fundamental components of the GSXR are a very good foundation to work from.

When it comes down to riding the bike and using it for what it was designed for, the latest model is a definite improvement in performance. The handling, suspension, brakes, engine power and rider comfort are all very noticeable improvements.

I have found the looks have really grown on me and I now like the appearance as good as any previous model. Had the appearance not “grown on me” I wouldn’t care….the bike is too good to turn down and besides I can’t see it while I’m riding anyway….:lol

I would urge anyone in the market for a new sportbike to actually ride the 2011 GSXR befor shunning it for its appearance. You may find it is the ugliest bike you will ever love:biggrin
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I complied the following list of 2011 changes from four different magazine review articles and comparing the old and new Service Manuals. The old K8/K9 Service Manual can be downloaded free in PDF format. I purchased the hard copy 2011 750 L1 Service Manual. The current September 2011 Sport Rider magazine describes most (but not all) of the changes.

Changes in 2011 GSX-R750 L1:
New Showa Big Piston Forks move more fluid in a more controlled fashion
New BPF front suspension is 2.2 pounds lighter
New front suspension adjusters
Fork springs relocated to fork bottoms, submerged in oil for less foaming
New Showa rear shock, lighter components (preload adjuster rings and spring)
New rear suspension linkage, simplified and lighter
New Brembo monobloc front brake calipers (one piece design is more rigid, lighter)
New Nissin rear brake caliper, lighter
Reshaped intake valves, lighter due to a new stronger titanium alloy
New pentagonal cutouts between cylinders, reducing pumping losses
New airbox
New air filter
New intake trumpets
Revised ECM (engine management)
Revised ignition control circuit adjusts spark timing to engine temperature
Revised dual throttle-valve 8-hole fuel injector system
Primary injectors re-angled to improve fuel atomization
Fuel efficiency improved 10%
Lowered emissions
ECM moved to front of airbox for wiring harness weight savings (1/2 pound)
Drive mode C eliminated, good riddance
Drive mode switch moved to left trigger finger position (easier to change mode on the fly)
New exhaust with titanium muffler, 2.4 pounds lighter
Engine tilted back 3 degrees, shortens frame and wheelbase 15 mm
New frame is three pounds lighter yet more rigid
New swingarm is two pounds lighter yet more rigid
Front cowling 55 mm shorter
Rear cowling 35 mm shorter
New dual-stacked headlight, one pound lighter
New bodywork simplified with fewer panels and brackets, seven pounds lighter
New smaller bodywork is more aerodynamic
New seat (more comfort)
Narrower seat area for faster transitions and lower perceived seat height
New reshaped and shorter gas tank (shorter reach)
Altered handlebar angle (part of revised ergo package)
New instrument cluster (from GSX-R1000) with new features, lighter
Lap timer/stopwatch, programmable rpm indicators
Revised slipper clutch with altered ramp angle
Clutch release adjusting screw one turn out (instead of 1/2 turn)
New lighter front wheel
New lighter rear wheel
New lighter rear sprocket drum
New rear sprocket mount hole pattern, not backwards compatible
Lighter front and rear axles
New external locknut design for front axle simplifies fork end, lighter axle, for net weight loss

Overall 18 pounds lighter than the previous model

A report of the GSX-R600 L1 says that there are very few carry over parts from the K9:
Gas cap
Ignition coil
Alternator
License plate light
Fuel pump
Triple clamps

I suspect but cannot confirm refinement of PVD and SCEM processes (not new but fairly recent and undergoing advancement):
Chromium-nitride Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) coating of piston rings (resistant to extreme high temperatures) lowers friction and prevents micro welds at top dead center
Suzuki Composite Electrochemical Material (SCEM) cylinder plating that improves heat transfer, durability, and ring seal
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Forgot to mention one place the 750 missed the mark, as compared to Suzuki's published claims.....

American Suzuki's printed literature and Suzuki's USA website claims that the showa rear shock is ride-height adjustable, leading one to believe there is a threaded shaft on the shock shaft for adjusting ride-height.

From Suzuki's USA website:

"Showa Rear Shock
A single Showa rear shock features externally adjustable rebound and compression damping, along with adjustable ride height. "

Unfortunately the ride height is only (properly) adjustable by shimming the shock, which requires the use of a rear stand, a metal rod, two jack stands, and removal of the upper shock mounting clevis to install shims.

I wouldn't be surprised if this may have been a japanese-english translation issue?? Whatever the case, they need to clear this up asap.
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You could have the dealer add a ride height washer/spacer at little expense, but that could be done with other versions too, so it is not a new feature. I dialed back the rear preload (I weigh 165 lbs), but that lowers rear ride height. A washer/spacer would keep my softer setting, but put the ride height back to stock levels.

Congrats on your shrewd purchase by the way.
You could have the dealer add a ride height washer/spacer at little expense, but that could be done with other versions too, so it is not a new feature.
I agree. I will contact the service department at my dealer to see if this was possibly an assembly problem and I got a shock for a 600 (GSXR600 has no ride height adjustment), or if it both were designed w/o ride height adjustment and literature is wrong.

In any case, I feel the bike is very much improved and is a great package. Will start another thread and/or search for info on the rear shock adjustment question.
I have over 10 bikes in my garage as for the gixxers I have the 07 the 08 the 09 the 10 and 11 750. Let's be honest for a second this one is by far the best one they have made. It does not compare to my other gixxers, actually I'm thinking of selling the older ones, the 2011 made my other gixxers feel like shit. And as far as looks go, this is the best looking one period. Sorry guys, but I think all of you are just talking smack about this because you cannot upgrade. I bet if you had the 2011 you would talk smack about the previous ones. Don't be so silly. This is by far the best 750 to date period.
I am going out on a limb to make a bold prediction. I actually hope that I'll be wrong. Not only is the 2011 L1 the best GSX-R750 to date, I predict it will be the best (aluminum-based) GSX-R750 in the future too.

1. The upgrade list shows they improved every component system this year and lost 18 lbs
2. The global recession will continue to stifle motorcycle R&D for a decade or more
3. The next generation 750 will most likely be equipped with electronic traction control, wheelie control, stoppie control, and anti-lock (+/- combined) brakes. The purists will scream foul as control is taken from the rider's hands
4. Until they abandon aluminum alloy as the primary material and go to carbon fiber for the frame, swingarm, and wheels, I don't see how they are going to shave another 18 lbs off this bike

What I am saying is that this might be the last GSX-R750 with manual control.
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Ride the 2011 GSXR750 and you WILL want one, its the best bike i have ridden since the old SRAD :)
one problem there... the only thing my srad was missing was HP.... with the 1k engine in, it gets me smiling from ear to ear..... thats what matters about the gsxr the smile... the noise...... the feeling
the gsxr spirit! ...... as long as its blue and white! :)
Though it retains its signature blue and white color scheme, the 2011 Suzuki GSX-R750 incorporates chassis and engine tweaks to enhance its road-devouring prowess.
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Anyone know a good dealer to buy a new GSXR 750 in the San Jose area?

Will there be any changes for 2012?

Hoping to get a good deal on the last of the 2011 models :punk
I complied the following list of 2011 changes from four different magazine review articles and comparing the old and new Service Manuals. The old K8/K9 Service Manual can be downloaded free in PDF format. I purchased the hard copy 2011 750 L1 Service Manual. The current September 2011 Sport Rider magazine describes most (but not all) of the changes.

Changes in 2011 GSX-R750 L1:
New Showa Big Piston Forks move more fluid in a more controlled fashion
New BPF front suspension is 2.2 pounds lighter
New front suspension adjusters
Fork springs relocated to fork bottoms, submerged in oil for less foaming
New Showa rear shock, lighter components (preload adjuster rings and spring)
New rear suspension linkage, simplified and lighter
New Brembo monobloc front brake calipers (one piece design is more rigid, lighter)
New Nissin rear brake caliper, lighter
Reshaped intake valves, lighter due to a new stronger titanium alloy
New pentagonal cutouts between cylinders, reducing pumping losses
New airbox
New air filter
New intake trumpets
Revised ECM (engine management)
Revised ignition control circuit adjusts spark timing to engine temperature
Revised dual throttle-valve 8-hole fuel injector system
Primary injectors re-angled to improve fuel atomization
Fuel efficiency improved 10%
Lowered emissions
ECM moved to front of airbox for wiring harness weight savings (1/2 pound)
Drive mode C eliminated, good riddance
Drive mode switch moved to left trigger finger position (easier to change mode on the fly)
New exhaust with titanium muffler, 2.4 pounds lighter
Engine tilted back 3 degrees, shortens frame and wheelbase 15 mm
New frame is three pounds lighter yet more rigid
New swingarm is two pounds lighter yet more rigid
Front cowling 55 mm shorter
Rear cowling 35 mm shorter
New dual-stacked headlight, one pound lighter
New bodywork simplified with fewer panels and brackets, seven pounds lighter
New smaller bodywork is more aerodynamic
New seat (more comfort)
Narrower seat area for faster transitions and lower perceived seat height
New reshaped and shorter gas tank (shorter reach)
Altered handlebar angle (part of revised ergo package)
New instrument cluster (from GSX-R1000) with new features, lighter
Lap timer/stopwatch, programmable rpm indicators
Revised slipper clutch with altered ramp angle
Clutch release adjusting screw one turn out (instead of 1/2 turn)
New lighter front wheel
New lighter rear wheel
New lighter rear sprocket drum
New rear sprocket mount hole pattern, not backwards compatible
Lighter front and rear axles
New external locknut design for front axle simplifies fork end, lighter axle, for net weight loss

Overall 18 pounds lighter than the previous model

A report of the GSX-R600 L1 says that there are very few carry over parts from the K9:
Gas cap
Ignition coil
Alternator
License plate light
Fuel pump
Triple clamps

I suspect but cannot confirm refinement of PVD and SCEM processes (not new but fairly recent and undergoing advancement):
Chromium-nitride Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) coating of piston rings (resistant to extreme high temperatures) lowers friction and prevents micro welds at top dead center
Suzuki Composite Electrochemical Material (SCEM) cylinder plating that improves heat transfer, durability, and ring seal
Looking at all this makes you realize just how hard the manufacturers work only get marginally ahead of the competition. Really shows how tight the competition is.
This 2011 GSXR 750 I just bought is the best thing since sliced bread.
I've ridden a lot of bikes as a mechanic besides 1000's, and this is really the best bike I've ridden.

Not only does it look flat out amazing but the performance is like some sort of spaceship. Extreeeemly smooth but so much power you better buckle up because it's gonna knock your socks off and take you to another world. Raw Power in it's stock form is astounding.

I have wanted a brand spankin' new 750 for years and I'm so satisfied I couldn't ask for any other bike in the world. This is the best year of my life having received this bike brand new off the floor and being the person to put the first mile on it. I have been waiting for this for far too long going through crappy used beat SoCal GSXR's and learning my lessons on Ninja 250's and R6's. I deserve this bike and will treat it like gold and ride it with pride in my Suzuki jacket that I have been saving for this moment since 2005.
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Well the 2011 750 is my first bike and I love it! I havent ridden anything to compare it to and have no desire to try anything else.
The new look does nothing for me!! Should have kept the 06-07 look!! Plus up is the deal with a blue frame!!
I just bought the 2011 GSXr 750 used from craigslist for $7,000 with 2700 miles. The guy needed the money. I rode it back to my place and just loved the ride. Its light and compact and has plenty of power. Thank you craigslist !!
i'm sure it's an awesome bike, but i just don't like the looks. and i won't settle for a bike if i don't like the way it looks. i'm probably going to get a '12 gsxr1000
looking at the magazines and internet pics of the K11 I thought it was ugly too..until one evening at the stop light a bike turned in front of me and it was love at 1st sight..I visited a number of bike shops trying to find a similar looking bike until I located the bike and guess what..it was a K11...beauty is in the eyes of the beholder..

as for not having or having the electronic features, I agree with a poster that this may be the final 'manual' GSX we will see..for 2013, I hear a major redesign is in for the GSX1000 and that we will see all these electronic features in place...my friend who races a gsxr1000 (and who is a far faster rider than me) turned in his gixxer thou' for a zx10r with TC and he is loving it..

but really as in everything it is personal choice..

Cheers!
I like it better in person.
Just picked one up last week, absolutely love it!!! Anyone have recommendation for rear spools? Was looking at the Yoshi ones.
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