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Discussion Starter #1
My stator went out last week and I replaced it and the regulator. The voltage when running is 14.4 volts now, I am using a lightweight Lithuium battery that shows 13.2 volts when bike is not running. I pulled the positive terminal off of the battery when the bike was running as a last check to be sure it's charging. The bike died when I did this. Normally the voltage from the stator will keep the bike running. Are Suzukis different? thanks
 

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My stator went out last week and I replaced it and the regulator. The voltage when running is 14.4 volts now, I am using a lightweight Lithuium battery that shows 13.2 volts when bike is not running. I pulled the positive terminal off of the battery when the bike was running as a last check to be sure it's charging. The bike died when I did this. Normally the voltage from the stator will keep the bike running. Are Suzukis different? thanks
NEVER disconnect the battery from a running bike, BAD shit happens..:nono
14.4 jolts is normal @ 4000-4500 rpm, 13.2 on a lith battery is correct with engine off.
Hope ya didnt ruin anything..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
In all of my years working on cars and motorcycles disconnecting the battery does no harm. It should run on the charging system alone. Are Suzukis different from all other vehicles? 14.4 volts at 1200rpm
 

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Ex-Lady Supermod
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Do you have a service manual? If so, read it.

Don't have a service manual? Get one and read it before you do serious damage to the bike.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
you're the guy that reads the 12 pages of precautions before he starts his coffee maker.
So can you answer the question?
 

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Ex-Lady Supermod
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Nope, I'm the "guy" who reads the service manual so I can do the job the right way and know that you do not disconnect the battery while bike is running 'cause you know, I read the service manual. The answer to your question is no, Suzuki is not different from other bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Then my stator while putting out 14.4 volts is not putting out enough amperage to run my system. A little common sense goes a lot further. I am simply looking for an answer not a fight.Every forum has "that guy" We can see you're the one here. Over 16,000 posts??? I wonder how many of those you were insulting rather than providing help. You need to get a life!
 

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Ex-Lady Supermod
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Then my stator while putting out 14.4 volts is not putting out enough amperage to run my system. A little common sense goes a lot further. I am simply looking for an answer not a fight.Every forum has "that guy" We can see you're the one here. Over 16,000 posts??? I wonder how many of those you were insulting rather than providing help. You need to get a life!
You need to get a clue and you're "that guy" who calls members out for their post count and the "you need a life, go out and ride" type. Maybe more reading and less mouthing off. You've been told and I have shown you from the service manual, not to disconnect the battery when the bike is running, what more do you need, just DON'T DO IT!!!!! As to your post count comment

1. I have been a member here for 10 years and yes, the post count reflects that, to a point.

2. My being a super moderator here, EVERYTHING I do counts as a post, whether it is posting, PM'ing, starting a thread or giving warnings or infractions.

Now had you bothered to read the Suzuki service manual, you would know that when testing the electrical system, you put the brights on and look at the voltage at 5,000 RPM's. It should be between 14.5 and 15.5 and if it is under or over those numbers, you have a charging issue.

my stator while putting out 14.4 volts is not putting out enough amperage to run my system.
How do you figure this statement? You have a stereo system on your bike and/or is it a Christmas tree disguised as a motorcycle?

 

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I know things... A lot of things.
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I can't answer the OPs question, because I'm not sure how other bikes (or Suzukis) behave when disconnecting the battery terminals, while operating the engine but I can offer the following:

1) There is no need as far as I can see, to disconnect the battery, as a test, to see if the charging system is working. Here's why: assume the battery sits at some voltage, say 13V while disconnected and when running the engine it's at a higher voltage, say 14.5V. If that's the case then it is being charged and the charge current going into the battery, is proportional to the voltage difference. That's why the service manual only specifies that the voltage should be at 14.5V, i.e. sufficiently higher than that of a freshly charged battery. Of course, if you turn on more loads, the voltage might drop, and that's why turning on the high beam during the test is specified. So if it sits at 14.5V with the high beam on, the generator can supply the needed current to run the bike and keep the battery charged and that's all we need to know.

2) Disconnecting a battery from a running generator can cause serious issues, as already stated. See here, if you''re interested in more details. Note that the ensuing overvoltage doesn't need to fry anything right away. It can just put strain on wiring, connectors and devices (i.e. overheat them temporarily, enough to cause non-critical damage) that can accumulate, to cause premature failure. So practices such as these, can cause problems further down the road, making them look like random failures due to presumed design flaws or manufacturing problems.

3) I'm also not trying to pick a fight, but I must point out that, apart from "that guy" who reads the instructions, just to use a toothpick, there's also "that guy" who damages perfectly good equipment, because he feels he can perform maintenance, without knowing the basic operating principles of the equipment and/or proper procedures and why they should be followed. Perhaps that is one explanation for why there are pretty reliable used bikes out there, with heaps of miles on the clock, and others with heaps of problems and hardly any miles on the clock. For the sake of the bikes, if not for anything else, please, don't be that guy.
 

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I can't answer the OPs question, because I'm not sure how other bikes (or Suzukis) behave when disconnecting the battery terminals, while operating the engine but I can offer the following:

1) There is no need as far as I can see, to disconnect the battery, as a test, to see if the charging system is working. Here's why: assume the battery sits at some voltage, say 13V while disconnected and when running the engine it's at a higher voltage, say 14.5V. If that's the case then it is being charged and the charge current going into the battery, is proportional to the voltage difference. That's why the service manual only specifies that the voltage should be at 14.5V, i.e. sufficiently higher than that of a freshly charged battery. Of course, if you turn on more loads, the voltage might drop, and that's why turning on the high beam during the test is specified. So if it sits at 14.5V with the high beam on, the generator can supply the needed current to run the bike and keep the battery charged and that's all we need to know.

2) Disconnecting a battery from a running generator can cause serious issues, as already stated. See here, if you''re interested in more details. Note that the ensuing overvoltage doesn't need to fry anything right away. It can just put strain on wiring, connectors and devices (i.e. overheat them temporarily, enough to cause non-critical damage) that can accumulate, to cause premature failure. So practices such as these, can cause problems further down the road, making them look like random failures due to presumed design flaws or manufacturing problems.

3) I'm also not trying to pick a fight, but I must point out that, apart from "that guy" who reads the instructions, just to use a toothpick, there's also "that guy" who damages perfectly good equipment, because he feels he can perform maintenance, without knowing the basic operating principles of the equipment and/or proper procedures and why they should be followed. Perhaps that is one explanation for why there are pretty reliable used bikes out there, with heaps of miles on the clock, and others with heaps of problems and hardly any miles on the clock. For the sake of the bikes, if not for anything else, please, don't be that guy.
Well sed, young fella.. yer wizer than a "tree fulla owls"..
 
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