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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This might seem to be an odd place to advertise one of those for sale but I have heard that these are the same length as a second gen shock and about 3 mm longer than the first gen 1100 shock. I’ve heard of people using these, although I don’t I have any experience with that myself. Anyway, I have one that was taken off of a new bike years ago when it was converted to essentially a full on super bike. New condition with a couple tiny scuffs from 15 years of storage. I have it on eBay for $400, anybody interested in it?

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, what I was saying was that I think a lot of people with the early, oil cooled GSX-Rs are using these. I think it can be put on a second generation (1988-on) GSX-R with a few modifications to the battery box.

You’d have to look at the shock length of an 03-04 to see how it compares. This one should be 315 mm long.
 

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Is that length c-c? Interesting that it's shorter but has a higher rate than the other 1000's. The service manual says the standard installed spring length is 161 mm. Do you happen to know what B71C means?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
If you want to install this on a newer model, you might be able to compensate for the difference in the shock length by changing the dog bone length. I don’t know, my interest was whether or not somebody could use it on an earlier, oil cooled bike. It’s exactly the same length as the second gen 750 shock and 3 mm longer than the first gen 1100 shock. Some people use a aftermarket rear cushion lever on the 86-88 1100s, to get more ride height in the rear. I have one of those I am installing on a bike right now. A slightly longer shock would accomplish the same thing on the 1100.

That’s up to somebody else to figure out. I know people have used these, I never have. It’s a nice shock and it has essentially zero mileage on it. Plus, it’s taking up space in my garage and I’ll never use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I thought about this some more and I guess I should point out one more thing. GSX-Rs from the 2000s had a separate upper shock clevis, mounted to the frame. Actually, that started during the SRAD era, but I digress…

If you wanted to use a shock that is shorter than the one normally fitted to the bike, the easiest way to accommodate that would be to shim the upper clevis down, or use an aftermarket adjustable clevis, like Yoshimura used to supply. Most of the shocks of that era had a similar stroke in the range of 70 to 75 mm, which is the other factor that you have to consider, so a person would have several options.
 
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